No Child no more? Are GOP proposals to dump AYP a step forward or back?

Will the GOP plan to gut the accountability provisions of No Child Left Behind improve education?  (Dean Rohrer/AJC file)

Will the GOP plan to gut the accountability provisions of No Child Left Behind improve education? (Dean Rohrer/AJC file)

Depending on where you stand — outside a school or inside — No Child Left Behind either pushed public education to new heights or kicked it to the curb.

Used by President George W. Bush as a cattle prod for greater student achievement, the 2001 law ramped up the federal role in schools and spawned a new lexicon of education acronyms, from AYP (adequate yearly progress) to NI (needs improvement).

The landmark legislation had standardized testing as its engine, causing critics to charge that the law reduced U.S. classrooms into “drill-and-kill” labs where worksheets and practice exams edged out science fairs and hands-on learning.  The unrelenting pressure to raise test scores caused educators in some schools, including many in Atlanta, to resort to cheating to mask disappointing AYP results.

Despite its Republican pedigree, a group of GOP senators, including Georgia’s Johnny Isakson,  announced a quartet of bills last week that will essentially disassemble the most contentious and demanding provisions of No Child left Behind, including AYP.  In a media conference-call, Isakson said the goal was to ease federal mandates over all but the lowest-achieving 5 percent of American schools. Isakson and fellow senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee characterized the bills as a restoration of state and local control of schools.

Rather than the federal government acting as a national school board and decreeing whether schools made adequate progress, the states would become the judge and jury.

“The principle effect of the bill for the nation’s 100,000 public schools is to get out from federal mandates on deciding which schools are succeeding or failing,” said Alexander. “A lot has happened in the last 10 years. It is time to transfer responsibility back to the states and cities.”

But are flexibility and freedom simply a return to the see-no-evil past?

At the time that Congress passed No Child Left Behind, many schools allowed limited-English- proficient children, poor kids and students with disabilities to languish in the back row.  Systems concealed these historically low-achieving clusters by releasing only average performance scores for schools.

While some schools appeared high-achieving, often they were only succeeding with the children who arrived in classes well ahead of the curve. No Child Left Behind pulled off the cloak off mean average scores.

“When left to their own devices, states have a long, well-documented history of aiming far too low and shortchanging the schools that serve our most vulnerable children. It’s because of that history that Congress sought to hold states accountable for results in the first place,” said Amy Wilkins, vice president for government affairs at the Education Trust, a Washington-based advocacy group for low-income students,

In a concession to local control, No Child permitted states to set their own improvement targets. “More than half of the states chose to set their annual target at any progress, meaning that even a bump from 50.0 percent to 50.1 percent was acceptable,” said Wilkins.

The bar was set so low that U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan complained about a dumbing- down of standards, saying, “We’ve seen a race to the bottom. We have been lying to children and lying to families in telling them they are prepared for college and careers when, in fact, they are nowhere near ready.”

But Isakson and Alexander counter that 44 states, including Georgia and Tennessee, have demonstrated a commitment to enhanced student learning by adopting the Common Core State Standards, a state-led initiative to set a purportedly higher and more relevant bar for what students should know.

As to weakening accountability by ceding it to states, Isakson said the proposed GOP changes still require states to “keep in place all testing, disaggregation of data and reporting. The best enforcement mechanisms are transparency and reporting.”

Under the GOP scenario, the community will provide the accountability, demanding change if school data reveal under-served students.

But will the publication of data and transparency alone lead to improvement without any real sanctions?

Wilkins doesn’t think so, saying, “We’ve had nutritional labels on food for decades, yet obesity rates in America are going up, not down.”

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

64 comments Add your comment

Dunwoody Mom

September 22nd, 2011
9:32 am

Note to Amy Wilkins…creating an educational environment where “success” is based solely on test scores IS “aiming far too low” and 10 years later our most vulnerable children are most likely less educated than ever before.

Inman Park Boy

September 22nd, 2011
9:47 am

Laying aside my feelings aboiyr NCLB generally, I just cannot buy the notion that the demand to raise test scores “caused” educators to become cheaters. Your own child could use that excuse if you complained about a poor grade; would you buy it? No.

Having said that, I will say also that NCLB, like any educational “law” passed by any legislative body, state or federal, is doomed to failure if it in fact equates scores on a standardized test with actual learning. Standardized tests to a pretty decent job of assessing academic ability (SAT, ACT), but they do a terrible job in assessing an individual child’s learning. The only valuable use I have ever seen of standardized tests is in assessing a curriculum so as to spot weakneesses and strenghts in a that curriculum (NOT a given child). The ITBS and the SAT-10 are good examples of this sort of nationall normed test. These scores have helped me make many good educational decisions. Any decent classroom teacher (and by decent I mean a pretty darn good teacher, and it is up to the principal to make this determination and weed out the bad ones) can tell you whether the chidlren in his/her class are learning what he/she is teaching. If you have confidence in a teacher, and if she tells you that Junior has an “A” in reading, take it to the bank.

Tony

September 22nd, 2011
9:48 am

NCLB was biased against children and severely flawed from the outset. By including the requirement for all students to be “on grade level by 2014″ demonstrates how far out of touch the politicians were with real life when they came up with this plan. The AYP determinations were designed to be exceptionally harsh. Requiring schools to get a “Yes” in every single box of the complex grid in order to earn AYP also shows how far out of touch Washington is with the real world.

The idea of accountability was greatly distorted with the implementation of this law, and while there are certainly areas where we need to improve our schools, the methods attached to this law have proven to be harmful to children.

With that said, I’m not so sure about more proposals coming from the republicans! You better read the fine print. Also, check to see how much ALEC and Gates influence is present.

APS 4th grade teacher

September 22nd, 2011
10:00 am

As long as NCLB remains in place, or for that matter, any similar policy that steers in the direction of teaching to the test,….I and others will continue to cheat….big time! I will spend the majority of my day ensuring that my students experience a well rounded curriculum.

Thank you very much,
Enjoying my planning period

Really amazed

September 22nd, 2011
10:10 am

Am I correct with saying that Duncan stated non-english students, low income students, disabled students etc to languish in the back row and just showing the average scores without for these students??? I wonder if this is the same when it comes to ALL taking SAT in GA. How do we know if the scores for these groups are truly being accounted for???? What if GA is around 1470 total for AVERAGE group? We will never really know.

Jerry Eads

September 22nd, 2011
10:23 am

The ONE laudable thing NCLB did was force schools to focus on low performing students. Indeed, public education in its brief history had not been expected to address the needs of the underprivileged’ that’s a very recent phenomenon.

The unintended consequence of NCLB is that this focus on the underprivileged was at the expense of everyone else. Here again, Maureen, you talk of “raising scores” – when in fact on test that actually CAN measure score changes (e.g., NAEP), SCORES ARE GOING DOWN. The reason for this is quite simple: Our minimum competency tests (CRCT, EOCT, GHSGT, etc. T) THAT ONLY MEASURE PASS/FAIL require students to pass – and hence teachers to teach – ONLY low level drill and kill factoids – roughly at the 10th-15th percentile (laughably called “high” standards). The cost to the country of this mistake in terms of productivity is incalculably enormous. For the country to survive, we do indeed still need to focus on helping as many of our children to become productive citizens – but not as one-size-fits-all 15th percentile drones. We may have raised pass rates on these low-standards tests, but we most certainly did not raise ’scores,’ and we most certainly did not improve anything related to actual education of our citizenry as a whole.

I hope also that the fanatical rejection of all central government by Republicans (never, EVER to be confused with actual conservativism) in this case enables schools to again try to address the needs of ALL students.

We have a while before we can tell whether the latest fad – the so-called Common Core – will actually become a positive influence on education. Let’s hope the powers that be put some resources into studying the impact of these efforts rather than waiting years until the AJC yet again brings them to task wondering why all this effort has not only not helped, but appears to have made things worse.

teacher&mom

September 22nd, 2011
10:36 am

“We have been lying to children and lying to families in telling them they are prepared for college and careers when, in fact, they are nowhere near ready.”

Yet…..colleges and universities are telling us the caliber of student arriving on their campus has diminished in the past decade. If NCLB was the answer, shouldn’t the opposite be true?

How many different ways will Duncan, Bush, Obama, Isackson, and others continue to perpetuate the myth (Texas Miracle) that NCLB works and only needs a little “tweaking” to make it better?

Who’s lying?

teacher&mom

September 22nd, 2011
10:39 am

Dunwoody Mom

September 22nd, 2011
10:49 am

Thanks for the link teacher&mom…

Policies good for the lowest-achieving kids may be bad for the highest-achieving kids. But we’re not even having that conversation

So true.

Halftrack

September 22nd, 2011
10:50 am

The Teachers can’t even evaluate themselves as to who is a good teacher that is performing or not. They are all about tenure and salary. Who wants to rat on another teacher. When school principals and superintendents become serious about who they supervise and the end result – - – a qualified HS graduate, we will see better students. With the Atlanta school debacle, all Georgia citizens realize what they are up against.

cris

September 22nd, 2011
10:52 am

Common Core Standards – the “standards” part should raise red flags – when you have a “standard”, you either meet it or you don’t and you can raise or lower as you see fit (NCLB.2); when you have a curriculum, you teach the information that is called for by the curriculum, and you test the child to prove or improve the curriculum and you have progress, not regurgitation of facts by filling in bubbles…..IMHO of course.

Michael Moore

September 22nd, 2011
11:12 am

Interesting that Isaksen wants to return control to the states and local schools, yet at the same time with Race to the Top we are telling the government…please give us money and we’ll do whatever you want. The common core standards are a national set of standards. Georgia’s involvement in PARCC means a national set of tests. So tell me more about this state control business. What’s coming down the pike is NCLB on steroids.

The Truth

September 22nd, 2011
11:19 am

“They are all about tenure and salary.”

Halftrack,

Very few school systems still offer tenure. Roy Barnes ended tenure years ago. There are a few that still offer it, but the majority don’t.
The salaries of teachers is not that great. Nobody went into teaching for the paycheck. If we wanted money, we’d be in another line of business.

Spacey

September 22nd, 2011
11:20 am

I would love to see the CCSS include a category for PTA participation. That should be factored into each school ranking. It would speak volumes.

Fred

September 22nd, 2011
11:28 am

Double teachers salary.

Dunwoody Mom

September 22nd, 2011
11:33 am

I was thinking about the changes requested to the tutoring services provided via SES. Currently, these are provided by private companies, companies which do not even have to provide qualified tutors; the state wishes to bring those tutoring activies back to the districts and the schools. I would think that hiring retired educators as tutors at the schools would be a good idea?

Really amazed

September 22nd, 2011
12:49 pm

In order to receive more funds from the lovely gov’t, GA had to sign up for RTTT….which in part included signing up for CCC notice how common core curric. has already changed to ccs common core standards. I believe their is a difference between ccc and standards. Here we go again with basic standards for all to live up to!! We will probably change again before roll out of assestment testing for all state by 2015. WHAT WILL BE NEXT????

Jessica

September 22nd, 2011
12:50 pm

A nationally standardized test might be a good tool for schools to evaluate their own performance, but it shouldn’t be part of some larger ‘carrot and stick’ approach mandated by the federal government. Just have all the kids take the test, then let school districts and parents decide what to do with the results.

William Casey

September 22nd, 2011
12:56 pm

Some thoughts on evaluating the progress of school, student and teacher performance:

1. Attempting to do any of these solely on the basis of a single high stakes test is not a good idea. Have one national test (something similar to the SAT concept) at the end of elementary, middle and high school for general comparison purposes. Perhaps add a “reading comprehension only” test at end of grade three.

2. The tests in idea #1 should NOT be administered by the teachers who taught the classes or secured by the administrators in whose schools the tests were administered. This would eliminate most if not all cheating.

3. Student evaluation should include a portfolio of representative student work over the course of an entire year.

4. Teacher evaluation should be primarily based on at least TEN unannounced classroom evaluations by experts not associated with the teacher’s school. The total evaluation might look something like this:

Expert observations = 60%
National Test Scores= 20%
Teacher work portfolio = 10%
Student Evaluation of Teacher = 10%.

It would not be necessary to evaluate every teacher every year.

5. Any SCHOOL comparison evaluation should be based upon adjustments made to reflect factors beyond the school’s control (i.e.- socioeconomic status of students reflected by free/reduced lunch participation.) Otherwise, it’s patently misleading and unfair.

6. And REMEMBER: All children can learn. However, some children are much more expensive to educate than others. This is simply REALITY. I mention this because this is a political question that must be answered. Is society willing to invest $5,000 to raise student X’s score five points when the same $5,000 investment could raise five student Y’s scores five points? Just asking.

7. Having parents visit their children’s classrooms as observers is important. Programs/incentives should be developed to encourage this.

All of this would be a step in the right direction for improving schools.

Jerry Eads

September 22nd, 2011
12:56 pm

@cris, that’s also one of my fears. Standards are just fine for fitting car doors to fenders on an assembly line, but “Common Core Standards” may only mean more minimum competency testing in schools. It’s easier to build minimum competency “standards” than it is to develop a true curriculum with proper scope and sequence.

One of the reasons the term “standards” has replaced the term curriculum is that very few people are decently trained in the very complex skillset of curriculum development. Teachers – and the people who leave teaching to “run” schools – those in district central offices and state departments – almost NEVER have such training. Knowing how to teach (and I’m not assuming those who leave the classroom do) is NOT the same thing as knowing how to develop a complete and coordinated curriculum P-12, and hence we’ve had the hodge-podge of uncoordinated “standards” rambling across and within the grades.

I THINK John Barge is smart enough to know the difference. I hope he’s smart enough to dispose of the folks who’ve created the previous travesties while keeping those truly wonderful people in the agency’s trenches. If not, they may simply re-create them again under a different name.

Ernest

September 22nd, 2011
1:04 pm

The ONE laudable thing NCLB did was force schools to focus on low performing students.

Jerry is on target with this. Despite our frustration with the rules and regulations associated with NCLB, it opened more eyes to low performing students. Way back when, we did not worry as much about these students as they likely had job opportunities in manufacturing if they had a good work ethic. Given most of our manufacturing base has shifted offshore, today’s low performers have fewer job prospects after completing high school. As this country is moving more to a service industry, it has become important to have additional education/training beyond high school.

If we really want to make a difference, we need to focus more on childhood literacy programs. Those that have a hard time reading by 3rd grade will have greater difficulties on obstacles going forward. This does not excuse greater parental involvement also.

Good Mother to Maureen

September 22nd, 2011
1:23 pm

This statement “The unrelenting pressure to raise test scores caused educators in some schools, including many in Atlanta, to resort to cheating to mask disappointing AYP results.”

is not objective. It’s your opinion, Maureen.

I agree there was pressure to perform well on tests but teachers had a choice, integrity was an issue, bonuses were at stake. You’re making excuses for the cheaters and I, as a taxpayer and a parent, resent your statement that makes it sound like teachers were held at gunpoint and required to cheat.

There is no excuse for the cheating. It is lying. It is stealing. It is theft.

THAT is an objective statement.

cosby

September 22nd, 2011
1:25 pm

Sorry, I thought Johnny co wrote the bill…another politician goes wrong. time to get the giovernment out of government schools. turn the schools back over the the parents and Teachers. How about a bill that requires parents to ahve their darlings ready for school, fed, clothed, behaved with homework done. how about parents showing up at school to help out. how about parents showing up a school for teacher meeting..ahhh..but then that would take away the new deal, great society idea of It is not my responsibility.

To Spacey from Good Mother

September 22nd, 2011
1:35 pm

You wrote “I would love to see the CCSS include a category for PTA participation. That should be factored into each school ranking. It would speak volumes.”

No, it wouldn’t. Many families work 8 to 5 and many schools’ PTA groups meet at 10 a.m. and at 4 a.m. Many businesses just won’t allow a parent to leave to go to a function during working hours and many cannot afford to miss the earnings when they do.

I regularly volunteer at my children’s school but I have to plead with some teachers and administrators to allow me to volunteer at the beginning or the end of the day so that I can participate.

Mostly, PTAs are run by middle class affluent stay at home mothers. They have the time to volunteer while their husband’s are earning the family income. When I asked one PTA officer at my children’s school if they could have some PTA meetings after 5 p.m. she tole me “We stay at home moms do ALL the work so we’re going to have the meetings when it is convenient for us.”

PTAs generally discriminate against the working poor and the working middle class. Some affluent parents are in management positions or own their own businesses have the flexibility to take off work during normal business hours by many don’t.

So your blanket PTA membership and activity measurement isn’t accurate, not by a long shot.

@ Good Mother to Maureen

September 22nd, 2011
1:57 pm

The statement, “The unrelenting pressure to raise test scores caused educators in some schools, including many in Atlanta, to resort to cheating to mask disappointing AYP results,” is 100% true.

Maureen is objective. It is the sole reason why I and so many of my colleagues cheated and will continue to cheat. The pressure to cheat has actually intensified this year. We suspect it’s because the district does not want to have a dramatic drop in scores over last year. If this occurs, it will bring even greater validity to our systems’ deeply entrenched culture of cheating.

FACT: Quality education will not begin to return until our district rids itself of the intimidating atmosphere created by test mania.

APS 4th grade teacher

Maureen Downey

September 22nd, 2011
2:03 pm

@Cosby, Sen. Isakson says he did write the bill while in the U.S. House.
Maureen

Hal

September 22nd, 2011
2:03 pm

Thank you Jerry!

When your asst. Superintendent for Teaching and Learning insists on calling the GPS “the curriculum” and used to be a higher up at the GADOE and the GA Leadership training department you quickly understand how and why this state is so far behind.

I hope you are right about Barge but I’m not holding my breath.

To APS 4th grade teacher from Good Mother

September 22nd, 2011
2:08 pm

You say you will continue to cheat.

You are a liar, a thief and a criminal. You have no business in a classroom and you don’t deserve to be employed.

You deserve to go to jail and I hope you rot there.

Pedro

September 22nd, 2011
2:16 pm

@Good Mother – If PTA involvement was a requirement then perhaps the PTA would be motivated to be more inclusive, if in fact they are not already. The tone of your comment sounds rather hostile BTW, and if you volunteered for start or end of the SCHOOL DAY? (I think you meant between 10:00 AM and 4:00 PM) and were rejected over convenience to stay at homes, then you have confounded me with your availability. Did you volunteer for 6:00 AM or 6:00 PM or what? I nor my spouse have never experienced volunteerism being rejected by the schools unless a parent wanted access to the classroom itself. Teachers need parental involvement in discipline and attitude outside the classroom, not meddling in how to school their children during class hours. Educate them in behavior and attitude and it will carry over into the classroom. Respect or disrespect for schools and educators at home is apparent to kids and they take that attitude with them to school. Sorry for you that you had a bad experience with volunteerism but I honestly doubt it is a common occurrence.

Pluto

September 22nd, 2011
2:27 pm

This has been said before but at least these legislators are gaining traction for reform and I mean real reform. Abolish the Federal DOE which skims funds off the top and does alot of nothing.Get qualified leadership at the state level (not political cronies) and administer on the local level. NCLB has been bad public policy since its inception and some folks have said so. We tweaked and held onto the false notion that this thing might work but alas it is time to fish or cut bait.

To Pedro fro Good MOther

September 22nd, 2011
2:45 pm

It is your comments that sound hostile. Skip the lecture, Pedro, you’re out of your element.

catlady

September 22nd, 2011
2:46 pm

Dream on, Pluto!

Another Teacher.......

September 22nd, 2011
3:14 pm

@ Good Mother. Guess I was wrong on the other blog about any “teaching moment”….your defensive insults continue as usual.

What exactly is the “element” that Pedro is “out of,” and why do you say that? (Aside from his criticizing a point you made about PTAs.) His comment is rational, courteous, and well-worded.

Paulo977

September 22nd, 2011
3:18 pm

Dunwoody Mom

September 22nd, 2011
9:32 am
“Note to Amy Wilkins…creating an educational environment where “success” is based solely on test scores IS “aiming far too low” and 10 years later our most vulnerable children are most likely less educated than ever before.”

BINGO!! What has developed as a result of the emphasis on AYP , Testing ETC ETC is that all agents involved in the business of Teacher Education and Teacher evaluation have been almost coerced into accepting the process of ‘drilling’ for standardized testing as EDUCATING our kids !The climate for real learning is not regarded as important any longer …..

Paulo977

September 22nd, 2011
3:23 pm

MiltonMan

September 22nd, 2011
3:27 pm

Yes, let’s lower standards even more and send many, many more high school “graduates” unprepared for college. This country cannot even produce enough engineers/scientists because we keep lowering & lowering our expectations of our kids – no grading using the “harsh” color of red, cannot play “kill the man with the ball”, equalization of all students within the same grade-level, etc., etc.

If the government is willing to get less federal involvment in schools, as a taxpayer, should I expect less federal spending on education?

MiltonMan

September 22nd, 2011
3:34 pm

Paulo, I can guarantee it that my children have learned more from my wife and me than any other teacher. My son has just been accepted to dental school at MCOG.

Teachers – want to take credit for what is all good in education but none of the fault of the bad (poor test scores, poor parenting)

My daughter is a freshman in high school & her AP Calculus teacher is an economist by trade. I spoke up and stated that I would expect a math educated teacher teaching math. That went over like a lead brick.

Please

September 22nd, 2011
3:50 pm

Talk about speaking OUTSIDE the classroom

“When left to their own devices, states have a long, well-documented history of aiming far too low and shortchanging the schools that serve our most vulnerable children. It’s because of that history that Congress sought to hold states accountable for results in the first place,
Amy Wilkins, vice president for government affairs at the Education Trust, a Washington-based advocacy group for low-income students.

You know what? In many ways, she’s probably right.

Still, I’d love for Wilkins to step inside a classroom and actually teach those children she blames teachers for not reaching, but I wouldn’t want to subject a group of already overburdened students to the sight of Wilkins, hiding under the teacher’s desk, balled up in a fetal position, in a puddle of her own urine, sobbing uncontrollably “It really ISN’T the teachers; it really IS the discipline!”

To: Good Mother

September 22nd, 2011
3:53 pm

Good Mother you don’t know what this testing craziness has done to teaching. It is no longer an art, we have become mechanics. In essence, tightening “bolts” (students) with as much “torque” (objectives that will be tested & test taking strategies) as we can squeeze into the day, …everyday…all year long. We have abandoned meaningful instruction and worse, a tailored approach that so many individual students need.

The Rabid Unrelenting pursuit of “dramatic” end of year test results causes good teachers to what is in the best interest of their students and personal livelihoods.

Another APS elementary teacher

Dunwoody Mom

September 22nd, 2011
3:57 pm

Jerry is on target with this. Despite our frustration with the rules and regulations associated with NCLB, it opened more eyes to low performing students

Ernest, yes, NCLB did do this. However, NCLB has done little, if anything, to help those low performing students.

Jennifer

September 22nd, 2011
4:26 pm

Back to see no evil. I don’t have a doubt in my mind. Return to states and local means squat. Fox guarding the hen house. Deal or No Deal ? No Deal. That isn’t meant to be political, just an appropriate play on words.

Jennifer

September 22nd, 2011
4:28 pm

Under the GOP scenario, the community will provide the accountability, demanding change if school data reveal under-served students.

But will the publication of data and transparency alone lead to improvement without any real sanctions?

Paleese. This is the biggest lie in the universe. When in heck did any community really have the power of change or the will for underserved students. Never in my lifetime.

We need tiger mom

September 22nd, 2011
4:40 pm

Democrat or Republican, I really don’t care who did what. We need to figure this out together. I do put alot of the blame with parents. It can as simple as sending well behave kids to school so the teachers can attempt to teach them for a change.

Every child from Buckhead to the ‘West End’ should have the same funding. If the parents in Buckhead can afford a little more out of their pockets then so be it.

William Casey

September 22nd, 2011
4:42 pm

This blog remains mired in the problems. What are the specific solutions? Oh, well.

MiltonMan

September 22nd, 2011
4:45 pm

Libs answer to everything = spend more money!!!

APS students receive more in funding than other school district in the state. The APS students are some of the weakest students in the state.

The spend more money crowd needs to brush up on cause and effect.

Please

September 22nd, 2011
5:03 pm

“Used by President George W. Bush as a cattle prod for greater student achievement”

Nice try; how about “Used by George W. Bush to take care of his friends at McGraw-Hill.

Like NCLB was ever about the students; please.

Ernest

September 22nd, 2011
5:24 pm

Ernest, yes, NCLB did do this. However, NCLB has done little, if anything, to help those low performing students.

Touché Dunwoody Mom. I don’t think there would be any arguments to that. I would still question whether we ever did anything of substance to help low performing students. I still submit that those in the past with good work ethics were able to find jobs and in many cases, move into the middle class.

Dr. Craig Spinks/ Georgians for Educational Excellence

September 22nd, 2011
6:39 pm

William Casey,

It’s much easier to bitch about problems than to do the heavy-lifting involved in solving them.

Jerry Eads,

The last paragraph in your 12:56 PM post is right-on-the-money.

Inman Park Boy,

My sentiments exactly. I’m sick of “excuse-based education” and its latest corollary, “excuse-based testing.”

Fred

September 22nd, 2011
6:40 pm

To Pedro fro Good MOther

September 22nd, 2011
2:45 pm

It is your comments that sound hostile. Skip the lecture, Pedro, you’re out of your element.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

How so/ I found Pedro’s comment to be very supportive of you and very inoffensive. Besides, what “demanding job’ do you have that you can spend roughly 1 1/2 hours here venting your bile but can’t break away from your job? Or are you really superfluous as far as your job is concerned and really need to just be physically there, not actually doing anything productive?

I was about to say after your first comment that there is a new troll here, given your lack of knowledge of the position Maureen has taken on the APS cheating scandal from the get go, but after reading your further comments, it would be a waste of time. All can see that for themselves.

But you won’t post now, it’s after work hours and you only take the time to post when you are SUPPOSED to be working. I would suggest that it is YOU who are the thief. You steal your employers money by blogging when you are getting paid to WORK.

Have a nice evening.

Fred

September 22nd, 2011
6:43 pm

Paulo977

September 22nd, 2011
3:23 pm

What does a teacher make? One has a profound answer!!

http://suifaijohnmak.wordpress.com/2010/08/17/a-profound-answer-from-an-educator/
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Nice bro. Good catch. Say hi to the folks at Jay’s for me sometime. Well just the GOOD folks lol.