So who did get into UGA this year? Here’s a profile.

Freshmen will walk through these arches next week when UGA resumes classes.

Freshmen will walk past these arches next week when UGA resumes classes.

If you are wondering who was admitted to the University of Georgia this year, here is a detailed report from the school on its incoming freshman class:

According to data from the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, more than 5,500 freshmen—an increase of more than 10 percent over last year—will be enrolled. The number of new transfer students remains stable at around 1,400.

“This year’s class will set new benchmarks for the institution in many aspects while maintaining the academic excellence that has become associated with UGA on both state and national levels,” said Nancy McDuff, associate vice president for admissions and enrollment management.

Those benchmarks include:

  • The largest number of Georgia residents enrolled at UGA, with close to 4,900 new in-state freshmen and more than 1,300 in-state transfer students. Based on the projected number of high school graduates in Georgia in 2011, one in 20 will be enrolled this year at UGA.
  • More than 480 first-year African-American students enrolled in fall 2011 (8.7 percent of the class).The previous high for entering freshmen was 440 in 1995. A record number of Hispanic students will be enrolled, with 300 entering first-year students having self-identified as Hispanic (5.4 per cent of the class). With more than 1,400 of the entering freshmen self-identifying as other than Caucasian, the ethnic and racial makeup of the entering class shows record diversity.

The entering freshmen will once again have a strong grade point average of almost 3.8 (the mid 50 percentile range is 3.63-4.0). The SAT average was again strong with a combined mean critical reading and math score of 1254, plus an average writing score of 606, for an 1860 on the 2400 scale. The middle 50 percentile of the class scored between1730-1990.

For those students who took the ACT, the mean score this year was 28, with a mid 50 percentile range of 26-30. Approximately 37 percent of the students were admitted based on ACT scores.

The number of applications received for this year’s freshman class—nearly 18,000—is one of the highest recorded at UGA for a new class, following several years of record applications. Since 2003, applications for UGA’s freshman class have increased by more than 50 percent.

“In a year of continuing economic uncertainty and significant adjustments to the HOPE scholarship, it was difficult to predict the impact this would have on our yield rate,” McDuff said. “But our goal was to continue to serve the state and maintain our commitment to excellence and academic achievement.”

The university continued to strengthen ties throughout the state, with students coming from 488 of the 796 high schools in Georgia and 142 of the 159 counties. About 12 percent of the class comes from other states and countries, with 223 of the incoming freshmen representing 51 different home countries.

Almost 7 percent come from families where English is not the native language. For the first time in several years, men will make up 40 percent of the freshman class. Approximately 5 percent of the incoming freshmen will be the first in their immediate family to attend college.

The 531 students expected to enroll in UGA’s nationally recognized Honors Program have a GPA of 4.03 (with a mid-50 percentile range of 3.95-4.13) and SAT average of 1453 (mid 50 percentile range of 1430-1490 on the Critical Reading and Math components only). The ACT average is 33 (mid 50 percent range of 32-33).

The rigor of students’ high school curriculum continues to be a key factor in admissions decisions, with some 95 percent of the students having enrolled in College Board Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate classes while in high school.

More than half of the incoming first-year class were in the top 10 percent of their high school class and 225 freshmen were first or second in their graduating class. Several students had a perfect composite score on the SAT or ACT and 136 had perfect scores on at least one of the components of the SAT. Nearly 10 percent of the students started college while still in high school.

All incoming freshmen will participate in the First-Year Odyssey, a new program designed to introduce students to the academic life of the university by putting them in small group seminars taught by tenured and tenure-track faculty on topics tied to their area of scholarship.

“Some 330 seminars will be offered this fall by faculty from many academic disciplines across campus,” said Laura Jolly, vice president for instruction. “The university community has really embraced this new initiative and I think students are excited about the broad range of topics. A question we often heard during orientation was ‘Can I sign up for more than one seminar?’”

Since many of the incoming students have not yet decided on a major, the seminars offer them an opportunity to explore an area of potential interest.

For those who have chosen a major, the most popular (listed alphabetically) are biology, biochemical and molecular biology, business, chemistry, international affairs, political science and psychology, following a pattern similar to previous years.

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

53 comments Add your comment

Double Zero Eight

August 8th, 2011
4:00 pm

Those that get in UGA have a pretty good chance of staying
if they hit the books on a consistent basis. Some may have
to change their majors in order to stay there.

ugaalum

August 8th, 2011
4:10 pm

Hope those freshmen don’t walk through the arches….it’s bad luck!!! Hopefully they will walk around them! (I know this is just local folklore, but I couldn’t help but mention it!)

Ole Guy

August 8th, 2011
4:35 pm

This detailed analysis is greatly appreciated. However, let’s examine “the south end” of the bear…we now know what goes in…now, perhaps, we should take a look at what comes out. Of the X number of freshmen, four years ago, how many graduated? Viewing the breakdowns…in-state/out-of-state, race, SAT/ACT performance, etc, etc…who’s “wining the brass ring” of achievement?

chillywilly

August 8th, 2011
4:59 pm

I’m sure that 300 of the 480 so-called “African Americans” are athletes.

JohnsCreekMom

August 8th, 2011
5:20 pm

Maureen, Is there any data on where in Georgia the bulk of the freshman are coming from? My guess would be the northern suburban schools like Chattahoochee, Johns Creek HS, Northview, Milton, and Alpharetta. Of course schools like Walton would be included too.

@chillywilly: Many of the African Americans attending these high schools might participate in athletics, but from my point of reference (mom of a CHS grad and recent college grad, and mom of a CHS junior) those students will be receiving academic scholarships. Not all of our children are athletically-inclined. LOL!

catlady

August 8th, 2011
7:06 pm

How many special admits and what are their demographics?

catlady

August 8th, 2011
7:35 pm

Special admits are not just athletes. They can be artists or others without the academic credentials but with special skills.

Really amazed

August 8th, 2011
8:23 pm

Any on music scholarships?

majii

August 8th, 2011
9:22 pm

Thanks, JohnsCreekMom,

I am also the parent of a high school and college honor graduate. I was black while attending UGA, and I graduated in 3 years. I have never understood why some people seem to think that if you’re black and admitted to UGA or even attend a decent college, you’re either an athlete, or there because of affirmative action. Since the Civil War ended, there have always been black middle class families in America that have sent their kids to college. There are many, many smart blacks in America, but because of societal memes, we don’t get the recognition we deserve.

maji, UGA, c/o 1974, BSEd.

FBT

August 8th, 2011
9:44 pm

@majii-The problem is that quotas still exist and scholastic merit is not the only factor in admittance for some students. Quotas harm students who are admitted based on academic ability. A blind admittance program would eliminate any questions on why a student was or was not admitted to a school.

Jennifer

August 8th, 2011
10:14 pm

Let me know when the % of African Americans and Hispanic freshman are any where near the % attending public schools.

Lynn

August 8th, 2011
10:27 pm

FBT…There are no quotas. It is illegal to admit someone to a public college or university on the basis of gender or race. Those who are admitted deserve to be there. Also, UGA’s grad and retention rates are quite high. I applaud all of those admitted to UGA.

Lee

August 8th, 2011
10:32 pm

@majii, perhaps it is because a significant number of minority students are there because of affirmative action programs, both explicit and implicit, in college admissions.

This Princeton study finds that without affirmative action, enrollment of black students would decrease by two-thirds and hispanic enrollment would drop by one-half.

http://www.princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S11/80/78Q19/index.xml?section=newsreleases

Dr. Proud Black Man

August 8th, 2011
10:33 pm

Boy it doesn’t take these cuckolded fops and dandies long to play their “affirmative action” race cards now does it?

FBT

August 8th, 2011
11:19 pm

@Lynn-I have spent many hours listening to UGA officials discuss ways to increase diversity. These indirect methods included home address, high school attended, name, writing sample, etc. I stand by my original premise that applications should be blind so these secondary indicators can not be used to diversify the student body. No one could play the affirmative action card.

Atlanta mom

August 8th, 2011
11:26 pm

@johnscreekmom,
Why do you think the bulk of the students are coming from the northern suburbs? Is is because your HSs are so much bigger? What is your point?

Lynn

August 8th, 2011
11:39 pm

FBT…They may want to increase diversity but the race is not identified.I am involved with one of the most diverse high schools in the state. I can tell you it is not possible for the admissions department to have any idea of the race of one of our applicants.

Dr. Craig Spinks/ Augusta

August 9th, 2011
12:34 am

(M)ajii,

Well-said.

JohnsCreekMom

August 9th, 2011
7:30 am

@Atlanta mom: Not because they are the biggest (although they are pretty huge) but they are some of the best schools in the state. If you look at SAT or ACT scores statewide, North Fulton schools are always at the top of the heap. Not too long ago, representatives from UGA told a parent group attending a junior class meeting that Chattahoochee High School had the highest number of students admitted to its freshman class. My point is that these schools also have great diversity. Most of my children’s friends, some of whom are black, attended college on ACADEMIC scholarships, not athletic. I’m talking full-ride scholarships to UGA and Tech. She attended UT on a full-ride academic scholarship. She also has friends who graduated from Stanford, Northwestern, WashU in St. Louis, and Florida, all black students, all on full academic scholarships. These were hard-working students who were national honor society members. Can we just get past all of the affirmative action stuff and admit that there are motivated students of all races?

Dr NO

August 9th, 2011
7:37 am

“Hope those freshmen don’t walk through the arches”

They have a McDonalds Hamburger degree? Thats something new. At any rate, stay away from the McDonalds Filet O Fish. Over the last 11 or so years its really gone down hill.

the prof

August 9th, 2011
8:45 am

Argosy….hahahahaha

Mom

August 9th, 2011
9:23 am

Lynn–that is simply not true. You are mistaken.

Ajaylove

August 9th, 2011
9:30 am

Thank you, Maijii. I am so tired of people thinking that we never get anywhere based on hard work and intelligence.

Dr NO

August 9th, 2011
9:51 am

“I was black while attending UGA,”

What about before and after? ;)

A Conservative Voice

August 9th, 2011
10:17 am

Left out of the statistics was the number of “football players” who cannot read…….

A Conservative Voice

August 9th, 2011
10:19 am

@majii

August 8th, 2011
9:22 pm
Thanks, JohnsCreekMom,

I am also the parent of a high school and college honor graduate. I was black while attending UGA, and I graduated in 3 years.

To Majii – Are you still “Black” or did your experience lighten you up :)

Really amazed

August 9th, 2011
11:03 am

@FBT, this would be a great idea!!! @Lynn, I am sorry, however it ask right on the college application what ones race is!!! My son attended a program at GT over the summer and it even asked what ones race was!! The funny thing is some of these summer programs MIT, GT, other colleges will even pay for the program to minorities only. We had to pay FULL. (the new minority) Paying or not paying had nothing to do with academic ability or income level. The students did have to apply based on letter of recommendation from a high school teacher and motivation.

Just Sayin

August 9th, 2011
11:23 am

@ Proud Black Man, 10:33 am. “Boy it doesn’t take these cuckolded fops and dandies long to play their “affirmative action” race cards now does it?”

A cuckold is a husband whose wife has committed adultery. Are you sure that “cuckolded” is the word you want here?

Dr. Proud Black Man

August 9th, 2011
11:57 am

@ just sayin

Why do you feel the need to correct me? White skin privilege perhaps? Or is this the case of a “hit dog will holla?”

Atlanta Mom

August 9th, 2011
12:03 pm

@Johnscreekmom,
” My point is that these schools also have great diversity.”
And you define diversity how? From the 2010 AYP information, I note that your school has 18% people of color and 13.5% economically disadvantaged. Of all the northern arc school you mentioned–those are the highest percentages for subgroups. I imagine any school with an economically disadvantaged percent of 13.5 (or 3.6 for Northview, 4 for Walton) would send their students to excellent schools.

Atlanta Mom

August 9th, 2011
12:04 pm

*northern arc schools

raja

August 9th, 2011
12:07 pm

After reading some these comments and having our first black president, it really doesn’t matter if a black person get in base on merit or academics.

If a black person get in base on merit, excel in classes, become president of Harvard law Review and then President of United States, then still get treated like a you know what.

So it really doesn[’t matter, some folks will never see us as their equal. Whether we earn it or not.

Steve

August 9th, 2011
12:09 pm

@ JohnsCreek Mom. I agree that ALL races are/can be hard working and deserving. I think a better question is the socio-ECONOMIC make-up of a particular community. I think the northern suburbs are well represented due to a fairly well off economic base with many college educated parents of ALL races. I think schools/districts with higher percentages of poverty have a much harder time getting their children prepared for a demanding academic environment like UGA because of all the other challenges facing the children and their parents. (Mainly home environments that for whatever reason are not as supportive/receptive to a college education as those from higher socio-economic backgrounds) These high poverty communities seem to have the odds stacked against them.

JohnsCreek Mom

August 9th, 2011
12:23 pm

@Steve, I do agree with you about the socio-economic aspect. Although I will say that it is a misnomer to think that everyone living in Alpharetta/Johns Creek is fairly well off. When I speak of diversity, I am also talking about socio-economics as well. Yes there are many families who are quite well off, but even more that are just able to pay the bills. They made the sacrifice to live out here because of the schools.

@Atlanta Mom, you seem to have quite the chip on your shoulder and lots of time to sit and research the stats on the schools. I am mainly speaking from the viewpoint of a mom who has lived in the community for quite some time. I just wanted to make the point that just because UGA has many more black students in their freshman class than previous years, it isn’t because half of them are athletes. My guess is they are high-achieving students who are taking advantage of the HOPE opportunity because, despite the changes in the plan, it is still a good program. Can’t we all just get along??? Lighten up a bit.

Steve

August 9th, 2011
12:38 pm

I happen to live in a rural district with LOTS of poverty. In fact I work at a Title One school with documented 60-70% free and reduced lunch. Our high school sends a fair number of students to schools like UGA, just not the numbers districts with a higher socio-economic profile can. In today’s challenged economic climate, I think race has a smaller role and poverty has a larger role to play in educational prep.

Just Sayin

August 9th, 2011
12:46 pm

@ Proud Black Man, 11:57. I’m correcting you because you’ve used this word “cuckolded” in earlier posts on other threads, and look kind of silly and pompous given its meaning. Why can’t you take being told that you’re wrong sometimes? What on earth does “white skin privilege” (or brown skin privilege or black skin privilege) have to do with it?

Maureen Downey

August 9th, 2011
12:51 pm

@JohnsCreek, I asked UGA which counties students came from this year and received this response from the associate vice president for admissions and enrollment management:

While the definition of ‘metro Atlanta’ may vary, we use a 20 county listing in our data base. Of the students enrolling this fall, 3340 or 60%, came from these counties.

Ole Guy

August 9th, 2011
12:59 pm

Steve, thanks for the perspective. How does the graduation rate, at your high school, compare with that of urban schools? Of those graduates who go to colleges other than UGA, where do they attend? Of the graduates who do not attend college, what do they do…trades training, job market, Military?

I

Lynn

August 9th, 2011
1:19 pm

Mom – Georgia was one of the states leading the nation in doing away with race based admissions. In the late 1990s applicants who had been denied admission to UGA filed a reverse discrimination lawsuit.

And yes, colleges ask your race on applications and for a variety of programs. How else would Maureen have this data to report? However, it is not used in admission decisions. If race could be used, UGA and GA Tech might have a much higher percentage of races other than white attending.

Private colleges and universities may still use race as an admission criteria. This may be where some confusion arises.

A Conservative Voice

August 9th, 2011
2:10 pm

To DPBM – Offer is still on the table…….

Steve

August 9th, 2011
2:28 pm

@ Ole Guy. We graduate around 82 % of our high school children. Because of this number, our district has not made AYP for a couple of years. Despite high poverty rates and high ESL numbers, employees in the district work “overtime” to try to help EVERY child get ahead. Before school and after school tutoring are staples, as are summer reading programs. The college bound kids are about a third of the class with most attending state schools. A SMALL number of kids choose to attend private and do so with LOTS of financial aid and scholarship help. In fact, my son chose to attend a small private college because he got a large scholarship that offset the additional costs. For him,. ranked in the top 10 of his class, UGA and its HUGE class sizes were not of interest. There are also a large number who attend technical programs or the military. In our county a large percentage of college bound students are children of school system and hospital employees. Thus my assertion that socio-economic factors are much more telling in who attends college than race. That’s why schools from Atlanta’s northern fringe send SOO many to schools like UGA and Tech.

Maureen Downey

August 9th, 2011
4:04 pm

@UGaalum, My daughter, also a UGA grad, called me from Washington to make that same point. So, please see that I have changed.
Maureen

FBT

August 9th, 2011
4:45 pm

UGA released academic and race statics for the entering freshmen. Did UGA release the academic statistics by race for the incoming students? Those stats could end the debate and speculation on this blog.

Teacher

August 9th, 2011
7:01 pm

@ugaalum -I’m sure it was just a typo but it’s the Arch not arches. The Arch is at UGA, the arches are Mcdonalds. I know they point that out at orientation as well as pointing out that only graduates should walk under the Arch. :)

chillywilly

August 9th, 2011
7:11 pm

Did UGA release the racial makeup of its professors? According to some literature that I read, a black student can spend 4 or 5 years at UGA without ever having a black professor. I don’t think I would want to subject my child to such a hostile environment. Let’s not kid ourselves; the blacks that are admitted to UGA are “quota admits” or “athletic admits”, period!!

Ole Guy

August 9th, 2011
8:47 pm

Thanks, Steve, for your detailed response.

Dr. Proud Black Man

August 9th, 2011
9:04 pm

@ a conservative voice

?

JoDeeMcDee

August 9th, 2011
10:53 pm

The Arch with three columns…..Who designed that, anyway? Not a Tech grad…..

the prof

August 10th, 2011
8:38 am

Argosy……hahahahaha

Really amazed

August 10th, 2011
10:38 am

@Maureen, how many did GT take for incoming freshman??