Ron Clark: Not every kid deserves a cookie. But they all deserve a quality education to high standards.

ronclark (Medium)It was the first day of a school for fourth graders in a rural Georgia district, and I was there to watch their excitement — slowly shrivel and die. For 50 minutes, the teacher recited her class rules in a voice so listless and flat that she could have been reading from the telephone book.

I was literally praying for a fire drill so I could escape, and it still saddens me that those 27 children returned to that lifeless classroom day after day.

“That’s a molasses class,” says Ron Clark, the desk-jumping, algebra-rapping, superstar teacher whose astounding success with struggling East Harlem students was celebrated in a movie and by Oprah Winfrey. In 2007, Clark used his fame to create his dream middle school in one of southeast Atlanta’s poorest neighborhoods, intent on practicing the craft he still considers his first mission and also on training other teachers.

Today, the private Ron Clark Academy vibrates with the energy and passion that earned its founder a national teacher-of-the-year title and helped him pen a bestseller, “The Essential 55.” Now, he has a new book that speaks to parents and teachers, “The End of Molasses Classes: Getting Our Kids Unstuck. 101 Extraordinary Solutions for Parents and Teachers.”

In a conversation and throughout his book, one theme dominates: All children can learn to high standards and Clark will Double Dutch, bungee jump or rap U.S. history to motivate students to reach those standards.

Contrast the first day of classes at Ron Clark Academy to what most schools will do this month. Clark and his staff choreograph the first few hours to convince their students that this is going to be the best year of their lives. The students arrive to a boisterous band and the entire school staff lined up to hug and high-five them. Some children are swept up and carried into the schools amid hoots and hollers. Once inside, staff members barrel down a two-story twisting blue slide in the school’s atrium to introduce themselves.

Borrowing from Harry Potter, Ron Clark Academy established four houses, and students are assigned by a 6-foot-wide spinning wheel. Children run up the coin steps —coins from every nation are embedded in the steps — and take their first ride down the slide as their houses are announced. It’s pandemonium

And then it’s silence —for three days.

An unexpected side to Clark’s Willy Wonka persona is his insistence on Sunday-best attire for staff and students, impeccable manners, firm handshakes, strong eye contact, hard work and earned rewards. As he says, “Not every child deserves a cookie.” (Somewhere in his hometown of Chocowinity, N.C., there must be a proud Sunday school teacher.) After those wild, first few hours, Ron Clark students are not allowed to talk for three full days unless asked a question or at lunch.

For while the 39-year-old Clark describes his school as the most magical in the world — his classroom is entered through a secret passageway behind a moving bookcase, and a noted graffiti artist painted the hallways — he also calls it the strictest. “I was brought up in a strict Southern household, no back talk,” he says. “You have to set the right tone from the start.”

His students accept the rigid discipline, he says, because they see the deep commitment behind it. While the school charges $18,000 annual tuition, only 10 percent of students pay the full freight. Most pay according to their means, on average $45 a month. The school accepts only 30 of 400 applicants, and Clark visits each of their homes before classes begin, believing he has to understand “what that child experiences every night.”

If students are falling behind, Clark shows up at their home to work with them. He demonstrates math in parent/student classes so families can work together. Every parent’s phone number is programmed into every staff member’s phone. In their four years at Ron Clark, the students travel to six continents with their teachers and to several U.S. cities. On a New York trip, Clark cajoled Panasonic to thrill his students by flashing their school photos from a giant screen in Times Square.

Clark asks a lot of his teachers, who earn salaries comparable to their public school counterparts. In return, he works to uplift them, rounding up donations to present each with a $1,000 gift card to buy school attire and honoring them at public events. (And throughout his new book.)

Proceeds from his book go into the school, which also earns income from the 3,000 educators who come each year to watch and slide. Clark knows that not every teacher can jump up on a desk or perform a rap but he believes his school and its use of music offers a model with wider application. “We are a big store. You are shopping for something that works for you,” he says.

I know that many people will dismiss the Ron Clark Academy’s accomplishments by citing the considerable corporate aid that the school receives. (Delta flies students for free.) But I don’t think it is the kid-friendly facility, the two-story slide or the trips abroad that distinguish the school.

It’s the teaching.

I asked Clark whether we can expect any teachers to demonstrate the level of dedication he shows toward his students, a dedication that claims his every waking moment and probably invades his sleep as well. I suggested that his dedication could be called unhealthy since it left no room for anything else.

“Sometimes, it is unhealthy,” said Clark, acknowledging that he could not put in these hours if he had his own family. He feels that he is a parent to his students, saying,  “I have too many children.”

But Clark does think all teachers can adopt some of his principles — the book contains 101 — to enliven their classrooms, such as incorporating music and song, a hallmark of his academy. (He is a big fan of adding a djembe drum in his classroom.)

One simple idea I wish every middle school in Georgia would adopt is Clark’s Amazing Shake in which students introduce themselves to a variety of community volunteers in a series of stations set up in the gym or cafeteria.

Each volunteer station presents a unique challenge – one person might have a bandaged hand, another may be on a cell phone, another just dropped a stack of boxes –  and kids are graded on how they maneuver this social obstacle course. Do the students first help the lady pick up the boxes and then introduce themselves? Or, do they introduce themselves first?

The students receive feedback on how they could have better handled each situation. The feedback stresses three things every child should know: The power of eye contact, a firm handshake and a big smile. The students with the highest scores win a prize. (Clark is big on public celebrations for work well done.)

The guiding philosophy of the Ron Clark Academy is that one of the students will be president some day. Since they have no idea which student it will be, Clark says the school must prepare all of them to be the leader of the free world. That includes providing them with a global perspective, academic excellence and a firm handshake.

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

121 comments Add your comment

middle school teacher

July 30th, 2011
9:13 pm

Ron Clark is amazing!!!! I wish I could incorporate all his techniques into my class. I try to read everything he has written and will definitely get this book ordered soon.

Sandra

July 30th, 2011
9:23 pm

I think it is great that someone can inspire our children in such a way. This is how students stay excited about school and want to learn.

abacus2

July 30th, 2011
9:26 pm

I’ll listen to Ron Clarke when I get to pick and choose my students as he can. There is also no way that my public school would get funding for all the neat stuff he has. I try to be as exciting as possible, but I don’t have a personal Oprah.

Maureen Downey

July 30th, 2011
9:27 pm

@abacus2, I agree that he can pick his students now, but he could not do so in N.C. or East Harlem where he developed his methods.
Maureen

concerned grandparent

July 30th, 2011
9:38 pm

This is a great school experience!! On what basis are the 30 out of 400 students accepted? I assume this is a private school and not some sort of public magnet school. I also assume that students MUST follow rules or will get kicked out. Is this true? Also, it would be great to hear from the TEACHERS and PARENTS of this school! Atlanta needs more of these; why aren’t they out there?

K-Baby

July 30th, 2011
9:44 pm

I bet he doesn’t worry about “data driven instruction” and also does not have the layers upon layers of useless administrators to pile useless amounts of paperwork on teachers to distract them from focusing on the most important aspect of their job – actually teaching the students.

The Ron Clark Academy is yet another example of where a private person or entity can most always do a better job than any government agency.

Maureen Downey

July 30th, 2011
9:45 pm

@Concerned, The academy is a private school.
Maureen

Hall County Teacher

July 30th, 2011
9:45 pm

“An unexpected side to Clark’s Willy Wonka persona is his insistence on Sunday-best attire for staff and students, impeccable manners, firm handshakes, strong eye contact, hard work and earned rewards.”

Amazing. People now have to pay 18k per year for their children to be taught basic life skills. Instead of teaching to the same standards in a public school we now have to send kids to a private institution to avoid being sewed or questioned about our techniques.

DEE

July 30th, 2011
9:45 pm

The jury isn’t in on Ron Clark. I think he has a motive other than educating kids. Who knows these days!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Atlanta mom

July 30th, 2011
9:58 pm

Even when Ron Clark picks his students, he has only a 33% graduation rate from middle school

Elmer Gantry

July 30th, 2011
9:58 pm

Good for those students, but I can tell you that they intentionanally select “under-performing” kids so they have biggest upside for achievement gains…and their success is just modest with that. I’m all for high energy, creative treachers, but this environment is not the real world of public schools. The kids will visit 6 of the 7 continents while there…..let’s try that in Clayton County, or anywhwere for that matter. But I’m sure he’s doing quite well in the cottage industry of “education consultation”.

Curious One

July 30th, 2011
9:59 pm

Give Mr. Clark an APS school full of APS students ( and their parents ), teachers and staff in the next few weeks for the full year – You will likely see little to zero improvement – his selected kids and parents WANT to LEARN – it’s mostly about the kids and their parents !

Atlanta mom

July 30th, 2011
9:59 pm

excuse me, he has a 67% graduation rate

Atlanta mom

July 30th, 2011
10:08 pm

And how large are classes in the Ron Clark academy? Don’t get me wrong. I think what he is doing is wonderful. But it will not work on a mass scale.

Maureen Downey

July 30th, 2011
10:16 pm

@Atlanta Mom, I agree that his school can’t be replicated but I do believe that his teaching approaches can certainly be replicated. Class size is 30. He addresses class size in his book, saying that he believes improving teacher quality is more important than lowering class size.
Maureen

Atlanta mom

July 30th, 2011
10:19 pm

20 out of 32 students in the first class in Atlanta graduated. Takes a while to get to those two numbers, but they are there, in this AJC article http://www.ajc.com/news/atlanta/ron-clark-academy-success-561804.html

Atlanta mom

July 30th, 2011
10:22 pm

Maureen,
I am with you in that he has a lot to offer. Just as long as he is not held out as answer to public school ills.

Maureen Downey

July 30th, 2011
10:28 pm

@Atlanta Mom, He also addressed attrition when we talked, saying that the school did not do enough in its first year to help kids who weren’t doing well. He credits a new program — Second Parent — with improving retention. Struggling kids are assigned a staff mentor who works closely with them. He says it has cut the number of kids who leave for academic struggles.
Maureen

MiltonMan

July 30th, 2011
10:29 pm

See what happens when you get out of a government ran school with teachers who cheat..

winnie

July 30th, 2011
10:29 pm

Curious One, all children can be taught to want to learn. The approach to teaching this is the problem with the present system. APS students on my side of time south west Atlanta can be movitated to learn with the right teachers on board.Teachers need to love what they do same as Mr Clark. Stop whinning and thinking are terrible things to say about my side of town.

Another Atlanta Mom

July 30th, 2011
10:38 pm

To be clear, the article says that 20 of 32 students finished 8th grade at RCA. To say that only 67% graduated from middle school is misleading, since while some withdrew from the school (rigor and commute are cited as factors in article) that does not mean they did not enroll in middle school elsewhere (which, incidentally, is required by law).

I am a fan of RCA and applaud innovation in education in general. While not everything happening there is replicable in public schools, kudos to Ron Clark for coming up with new ideas.

winnie

July 30th, 2011
10:38 pm

Thank you MiltonMan for your wisdom. Now how is the government serving you?

SallyB

July 30th, 2011
10:47 pm

Did I read correctly, there are only 30 students in the school? How many teachers are there and for what subjects?

Grandma

July 30th, 2011
10:47 pm

As bad as I hate to say it, but back-in-the-day, when teachers could teach and not be told how to teach by some administrator who had never been in a classroom except as a student, things worked, kids learned, and tests were taken and passed. Now we have high-paid administrators messing up everything for everybody. I’m disgusted and afraid for my grandchildren.

Maureen Downey

July 30th, 2011
10:48 pm

@Sally, No, 30 kids in each grade, and the school goes from fifth to eighth.
Maureen

chuck

July 30th, 2011
10:59 pm

“He addresses class size in his book, saying that he believes improving teacher quality is more important than lowering class size.”

Maureen, It’s nice that he “believes” that, but research, (replicated many times) has shown that smaller class sizes improve test scores. While I am the first to admit that some educational research is bogus, I have read many of these studies through the years and I have experienced first hand what I am able to do when I have smaller classes. I have read the 55 essentials book, and to be honest with you, I can’t imagine what the parents of my students would do if I penalized my students for violating some of those rules. I also can’t imagine finding the time to teach those things when none of them is on the CRCT.

In addition, while I am pretty laid back in my class at times, there is no way in heck that I am going to stand on a desk and rap. Most of the teachers that I know are highly successful and have totally different styles. Every teacher needs the time to find what works best for THEM, and then they need to stick with it.

Write Your Board Members

July 30th, 2011
11:00 pm

There are 20 staff and faculty members listed here at the Ron Clark Academy.

http://www.ronclarkacademy.com/meet-the-team.aspx

That is an unbelievably unrealistic ratio of students to adults — one adult for every 4 students, if you are right about 30 per grade.

I have a child that attended private middle school -70 kids in each grade, 6-8, and had a principal, ass’t principal, dean of students and two counselors and probably another 20 or so teachers. It was a fabulous experience that public schools can’t afford to replicate.

I think it is unhealthy how he has to be a second parent to some of the student and if that is what it is going to take to “fix” public education, we are in real trouble.

chuck

July 30th, 2011
11:04 pm

I agree completely with you Grandma. I spend CONSIDERABLY MORE TIME doing things for administrators than I do planning lessons.

Steve Perry on CNN says

July 30th, 2011
11:35 pm

I have 2 neighbors.

The one on my right drives a 2011 Lamborghini ( a beautiful car) and the one on my left drives 2011 Hyundai Sonata.

It is amazing to see my Lamborghini neighbor discuss power and speed with the Hyundai neighbor telling the less car-heeled how if used proper technique and fuel, the Hyundai would have not trouble keeping up with the Lamborghini.

The sad part of this saga is that my Hyundai neighbor is continuously changing tires, fuel, oil and other additives to soup up his car. But, no avail, he continues to lag behind on the road and is to letting other aspect of his life get out of hand.

Well, this is the tale of RCA and your average urban public school.

lulu

July 30th, 2011
11:42 pm

RCA is fantastic, and there are some great teachers on staff. However, I’m not sure why the location of the school (”in one of the poorest neighborhoods of southeast Atlanta”) must always be pointed out. It doesn’t matter where the school is located; it’s a private school that chooses its students from all over Atlanta and seems to be relatively uninvolved in the community.

I would be much more impressed if they were more involved in building healthy, strong, well-educated communities than in improving education for 30 kids a year. Yes, it’s great for those kids, but I don’t see the school having much of an overall impact, and I have to wonder why the methods and message are not spreading further if they are so effective. Is it just the cost? Or is it just not realistic on a larger scale? I would love to see a RCA-style model that could be effectively implemented throughout the school system and impact a larger number of kids (rather than what seems to be a teacher self-help book); until that happens, I’m mostly unimpressed.

lulu

July 30th, 2011
11:47 pm

Also, regarding class size: of course class size is less important when you are able to choose students who will benefit from a specific teaching style (which their website says is how they choose students). In a public school, where kids have all sorts of different learning styles and abilities and teachers are still expected to effectively teach to all of them at the same time, class size is much more important.

40 yr educator

July 30th, 2011
11:50 pm

Mr. Clark needs a hobby! I’m single, devoted many years to improving my teaching skills with reading abstracts, developing lesson plans, attending Saturday student activities (extended day) and enjoyed the interaction. But there’s a point in life where you have to take care of yourself, expand your horizons.

Does Mr. Clark live in his school neighborhood?

Atlanta mom

July 30th, 2011
11:56 pm

I think Ron Clark does as good as job as any other private school that charges $18,000 a year for tuition.

Title1Educator

July 31st, 2011
12:27 am

@K-Baby “The Ron Clark Academy is yet another example of where a private person or entity can most always do a better job than any government agency.”

Don’t think so. Check his data against many of the metro Atlanta public schools without a whiff of scandal (i.e. Inman, Sutton), though their enrollments dwarfs his. Not to mention teacher-student ratio.

I have a problem when Ron Clark’s school is used as a model to critique public schools, when it’s a private school using considerable gifts from philanthropists and private industry with little scrutiny or accountability. Atlanta has a history of excellent private schools (Marist, St. Pius, Woodward, Westminister) and that market has grown incredibly in the last 20 years. While it’s great that RCA puts inner city kids on an equal playing field, but you can’t compare it to the average inner city, Title 1 public school.

My school, with nearly 1000 students, is full of kids that Ron Clark would never interview and families that he’d never dare visit at home. Still, there’s a building full of dedicated educators waiting to teach them. There is no admissions requirements, nor can we enforce arbitrary rules on silence. Our code of conduct is a district-wide policy manual created and ratified in an open, democratic manner. When I start jumping on desks, my students will surely follow and then ask me to find where the policy manual says that they can’t!

Many of our students arrive with deficits in language development, academic skills and social acumen–sometimes lacking proper attire and nutrition in their homes. Still, we teach them. I know of a case where two siblings were admitted to the Ron Clark Academy, but the younger sister was counseled out due to her learning disability. She was a sweet child, who just couldn’t keep up with RCA’s rigor. They didn’t seem to have the pedagogy to support her needs, which my colleagues considered minor. She was much happier once she transferred to a traditional public school.

I add that anecdote just to show that one model will never fit all kids. Clark supports his school with his publishing, his educator visits and training sessions, so more power to him. I have no idea how much his cut is, but he works hard for his money. I find, as some bloggers have already pointed out, his data doesn’t overwhelm as much as his performance and mission do.

Digger

July 31st, 2011
1:14 am

So now teachers have to jump around like organ grinders on angel dust to get students’ attention. How did America ever get to be the best without guys like this for the last 200 years?

Dr. Craig Spinks/ Augusta

July 31st, 2011
1:19 am

Don’t know about other folks, but I suffer from an old-fashioned case of “educational celebrity fatigue.” It’s a consequence of the GOTW or “Guru of the Week” approach to educational improvement. Educational improvement isn’tt about Ron Clark, Michelle Rhee, Diane Ravitch, Arne Duncan, Beverly Hall, Andy Baumgartner, Jonathan Kozol and dozens of others. It’s about intelligence, savvy, hard work, persistence, courage, relationships et al. demonstrated by and among each school’s teachers, parents, administrators, students and its neighbors in the surrounding community. Such efforts do not lend themselves to glitz but they do lend themselves to improved learning by our kids.

Dr. Craig Spinks/ Augusta

July 31st, 2011
1:20 am

OOPS” not “isn’tt” but “isn’t.”

Jumbolisha

July 31st, 2011
1:39 am

“While the school charges $18,000 annual tuition, only 10 percent of students pay the full freight. Most pay according to their means, on average $45 a month.”

Am I the only person who caught this? Let’s see, $45 a month is $540 on $18,000 tuition. So who pays the difference? Could it be…the TAXPAYERS. More welfare for ghetto children, most of whom will wind up in prison.

Beck

July 31st, 2011
2:09 am

“Jumbolisha” work on your reading comprehension. The rest is paid for by donors.

“I know that many people will dismiss the Ron Clark Academy’s accomplishments by citing the considerable corporate aid that the school receives.”

Must you stir the non-existent pot?

Question

July 31st, 2011
3:56 am

Maureen,
I would like some statistics on how these students fare when they leave RCA at the end of their 8th grade year and return to public schools in their local school districts. I’m sure it is a period of adjustment for these students when they realize they are back in the “real world” without all of the benefits and wonders of RCA.

Former teacher

July 31st, 2011
5:27 am

Did Ron share with you that he has been known to drink cartons of milk in front of his students to keep them engaged? The payoff – at some point the students get to see him throw up. I admit that might keep my attention, but is it good for teaching or for teachers? He shared this at a meeting for Fulton County teachers one year. His energy and willingness to try new things is to be applauded, but he is often way over the top. It saddens me to think that teachers are encouraged to go this far to try to reach students.

Fericita

July 31st, 2011
7:13 am

Ron Clark is a wonderful teacher doing amazing things. I’m glad he’s figured out a way that works, and I’m glad that he recognizes that it is not the only way. When talking about teachers observing his school he said “We are a big store. You are shopping for something that works for you.”

How refreshing!! Clearly, he’s still a teacher first, not an administrator. In so many school systems, they would look at his success and then require all teachers to install a slide or prohibit Doritos (another one of his rules). Clark seems to have a trust that teachers want what’s best for students, and that they actively look for good ideas. This is so much more encouraging than most top down reform!

GA parent/teacher

July 31st, 2011
7:43 am

If I were a corporate sponsor and someone came to me and said that only 20 out of 32 students had completed 8th grade, I would question the effectiveness of that school to meet the needs of its students. If any other middle school in Georgia had that level of effectiveness, the principal and some teachers would probably be out of a job or have to take some kind of staff development as a result.

What is the completion rate in the 8th grade in other private schools in Atlanta?

long time educator

July 31st, 2011
7:58 am

@ Write Your Board Members,
“I think it is unhealthy how he has to be a second parent to some of the student and if that is what it is going to take to “fix” public education, we are in real trouble.”
This is absolutely what it is going to take to fix public education and yes, we have been telling you, we are in real trouble. And let me add, the parenting deficit is not limited to one socio-economic group; Disengaged parents can be found across all economic groups. The problem in public schools is not the teachers, it is the disinterested parents.

GrannyCares

July 31st, 2011
8:02 am

Makes on wonder why our Schools of ‘EDUCATION’ have not picked up on Clark’s model! Fear that our Schools of ‘EDUCATION’ are graduating too many who do not have the self motivation and will to be teachers. Really makes one wonder just how low the standards may be to get into a School of ‘EDUCATION’!

Bill

July 31st, 2011
8:14 am

I applaud Mr. Clark’s dedication and creativity. However, there does not appear to be any accommodation for individual differences, for teachers or students. There is no magic bullet; no single right solution. My son was a high achieving student at Inman and Gracy (class of 2011). In the face of the whoopla (inflatable slide, etc.) at this academy he would have been looking for a place to hide, and he would have refused to participate – not in a disrespectful way, but in the manner of Bartleby the Scrivener, who simply said “I prefer not to.”

Write Your Board Members

July 31st, 2011
8:24 am

“As part of acceptance to the Academy, parents are required to sign a Contract of Obligation. This document pledges their support of the Academy’s discipline and attendance policies and commitment to the academic pursuits of their children. Parents are also required to donate 40 hours per school year to the Academy, volunteering, tutoring, working at concession stands, attending PTA meetings, and participating in workshops where our teachers will review the curriculum that is being taught in the classrooms. ”

Even with all this, Clark is still having to play pseudo-parent to at least some of the students. Most private schools don’t have to have teachers who also parent. I am curious why Clark Academy is different.

redweather

July 31st, 2011
8:40 am

That contract of obligation is very similar to the one parents of students at DeKalb Scool of the Arts have to sign. I assume something like it is used at other magnet schools. It is a good idea that all of the county’s schools should adopt.

ScienceTeacher671

July 31st, 2011
8:45 am

I’ve met Ron Clark, and he is amazing. He has that “sell ice to Eskimos” personality that is very engaging, and obviously he’s been able to convince many students and adults to invest in his vision.

However, as Chuck points out, each teacher needs to figure out what works for him or her. We can’t all be Ron Clark any more than we can all be Bill Gates or Julia Roberts or Edward R. Murrow. That doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t all strive to be our best.

It is also true that most public schools can’t enforce the discipline of the Ron Clark Academy, which I believe is probably at least as integral to its success as the fun things that get all the publicity. Also, please notice that the parents are all very involved and concerned with getting the best education possible for their children.

That said, yes, there are things we could do better in public schools sometimes, but it would also be nice if we had the resources to offer all our students the opportunities that students at RCA have. And kind of interesting that the upper/middle class social skills Ron Clark’s students are taught are not on the CRCT. In some schools of thought, expecting all students to have those skills is considered politically incorrect.

pskybskt

July 31st, 2011
9:07 am

To those in public schools that say you could do better if you had more “resources”, I first ask why is it you say “resources” when you mean “money”? That aside for a moment, if non-teaching personnel did not exceed 50% of total school system employees, then you would have more money. The fact is that the public education machine established the rules which require a PhD for this and a PhD for that (all not coincedentally PhD’s in some sort of education – not actual courses of study). Not surprisingly, the number of self appointed management types that get to publish ad nauseum more and more paperwork requirements for the teachers just keeps getting larger. Most importantly, these PhD management types don’t have to soil their hands by actually coming into direct contact with children – they can instead sit around feeling superior and claim their lives are all about helping the children. Don’t believe me? Next time their is a fire drill at the school – count the number of adults walking out without a class in tow.

This has all happened because of no competition. It is why competition is so vehemently opposed. The children are necessary to support the machine. Take the children away, and the machine withers. The machine must at all cost attack any and all that oppose the monopoly, because threatens this nice, comfortable virtually unlimited funnel the machine has attached to the taxpayers pocketbook.

Ron Clark is a threat to the machine – but not in a big way, so he is attacked in a way that prevent his efforts from growing or being duplicated.

If you want to improve education within 4 years, ban every School of Education at every university.