State releases End of Course Test results. Math still a challenge.

High school students in Georgia continue to grapple with the state’s more challenging math curriculum, according to End of Course Test results released this afternoon by the state Department of Education.

Passing rates improved on seven of the eight 2011 spring End-of-Course Tests, including Math II, a course combining algebra, geometry and statistics. But 45 percent of students who took the Math II test failed.

Thirty-nine percent of students failed the EOCT in Math I, a prerequisite to Math II that covers algebra, geometry and statistics.

This is the release from the state DOE on End of Course Test results.

The results of the Spring 2011 Georgia End of Course Tests (EOCT) show student improvement in seven of eight tests. In comparing the results to Spring 2010, students demonstrate significant improvement in Biology, Physical Science, and U.S. History. EOCT scores also improved for Ninth Grade Literature, American Literature, and Economics.

The percentage of students who met or exceeded the standards for Physical Science (76%) improved four percentage points over last year. Likewise, scores for Biology (70%) and U.S. History (66%) also improved by four points.

In April 2011, the State Board of Education approved a plan to phase out the Georgia High School Graduation Test, beginning with students who enter ninth grade for the first time in the 2011-2012 school year. Starting with these students, the EOCT will count as 20% of the final grade, an increase from the previous 15% level.

“We are very pleased with the improvement Georgia’s students have shown on the EOCTs,” said State School Superintendent Dr. John Barge. “I have always believed the EOCT is a better indicator of a student’s grasp of the content, and this year-to-year improvement is encouraging.”

The percentage of students who met or exceeded standards for Mathematics I (61%) decreased three percentage points, while the percentage of students who met or exceeded standards on the Mathematics II EOCT (55%) increased three percentage points.

In March, the State Board of Education approved Superintendent Barge’s recommendation to allow local districts to teach mathematics using either the integrated or discrete delivery method.

“Our Mathematics EOCT results are showing us that some students are struggling with the more rigorous standards, which underscores the need for different instructional delivery methods,” said Superintendent Barge. “While our Mathematics II results increased, those scores are still significantly lower than other content areas. The rigor of the Georgia Performance Standards, however, positions us well as we transition to the Common Core State Standards that contain the same level of rigor found in our existing standards.”

–from Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

92 comments Add your comment

AlreadySheared

July 20th, 2011
5:24 pm

“Our Mathematics EOCT results are showing us that some students are struggling with the more rigorous standards, which underscores the need for different instructional delivery methods,”

Ha! What this underscores is the need for more students, especially the bottom half, to DO THEIR HOMEWORK. Independent effort to learn the material and come to class prepared will have to suffice until Schoolbox resolves their Magic Math Learning Instructional Dust shortage.

slp98

July 20th, 2011
5:35 pm

AlreadySheared – Amen.

oldtimer

July 20th, 2011
5:38 pm

There may be some that the new material is just too hard for their ability.

RJ

July 20th, 2011
5:42 pm

“What this underscores is the need for more students, especially the bottom half, to DO THEIR HOMEWORK.”

I have NEVER, EVER had a mind for math. I’m sure I would’ve struggled with the new math curriculum. Doing homework can’t help a kid that doesn’t understand what’s being taught in class. I’m lucky that my kids have an awesome tutor to help them when they have questions. My oldest, which is in high school, struggles with math. My youngest in middle school doesn’t struggle. Everyone is different.

TW

July 20th, 2011
5:44 pm

Ever notice how failing math scores are generally as great as the obesity problem in the corresponding area?

ANGELA

July 20th, 2011
5:46 pm

There are two major problems that I have found with my students. They cannot regroup and they don’t know their multiplication facts. For that reason I introduce and teach my second grade students their facts and how to regroup. I found that regrouping is harder than learning their facts. So, I came up with a method that seemed to help most. But, I might also, add that students must practice as much as possible and they all need parental assistance.

I spoke yesterday about the parent that was upset because of the cheating that her daughter is going to the 6th grade and does not know her facts. I still ask the question and where were you?
If parents became more involved with their students academically they would know what they deficient in.

ANGELA

July 20th, 2011
5:48 pm

Oh, and I might add that if you ask the teacher I am sure they would be willing to assist. But, if you go to them acting like a fool they will resist. We do damand RESPECT.

ANGELA

July 20th, 2011
5:58 pm

@TW,

Please so that my mind does not run away with the unthinkable, please say exactly what you mean.

RJ

July 20th, 2011
6:02 pm

@Angela, I saw that story and was in disbelief. Shouldn’t her daughter have learned her multiplication tables in 3rd grade, or at least by 4th?

TW

July 20th, 2011
6:10 pm

ANGELA,

Math ability, more than reading and language arts, is hampered by an individual being out of shape and overweight. And because poor socioeconomics are tied to obesity…

Want to fix test scores – especially math? Then hold you local politician accountable for the health of your community (jobs, crime, healthcare) the next time he tries to point a finger at the school.

Here’s another fun one -

Nationally, 75% graduate high school
Nationally, 25% of the population lives below the poverty line

Paddy O

July 20th, 2011
6:28 pm

It appears Mr Barge has his sights set entirely too low. 76 in in physical science is a C, not good. Biology at 70 is C-, worse. US History, which should be fascinating to all at 66 is a D, close to failing. What is the % of correct answers needed to pass these tough tests?

Are the kids not trying, not motivate or something else?

Paddy O

July 20th, 2011
6:30 pm

Angela – is facts what I used to call a multiplication table? And what is regrouping?

ANGELA

July 20th, 2011
6:34 pm

@RJ,

You are currect. She should have been introduced to them during the latter part of the second semester in second grade. She should have learned them completely by the completion of the 3rd grade. This is why I start at the beginning of the school year teach the fact to my students as math homework.

One of the reasons that I feel and have observed why there are so many failures in math is that most parents in the inner city and else where are not involved in a positive way. That lady is one of many who is the first to blame the teachers instead of herself and her daughter. Her daughter is I am more than positive that her math scores were changed. I say that because she needed to be able to multiply on many of the CRCT math problems. Most of the problems are word problems and you must be able to know when to add, subtract, multiply or divide. Multiplication is nothing more than addition and division is nothing more than mulitiplication and subtraction some what stands alone. But, you still must know when to add and to take away.

@TW,

I don’t reside in the inner city but I did grow up there. I do not in anyway connect the lack of math skills with weight. However, statistics have shown that there are significant differeces between males and females in math acheivement. I know that if I believed that weight had something to do with math ability I could say that many of my skinny students must be “fat” in their minds. Because many of the failures are with skinny students not the over weight (I only had one fat student so to speak last year and he was very good in math just not in other subjects).I really don’t believe that you fixed your fingers to type that. This is why I ask for clarity.

ANGELA

July 20th, 2011
6:37 pm

@Paddy O,

Yes, facts are multiplication tables and regrouping is borrowing. (I can tell that you are a bit older in the area of above 40) smile. Yes, if I did not teach it I would be in the dark too!

Carter

July 20th, 2011
6:52 pm

Some of you are teachers. Would you please consider using commas. I know this isn’t a formal medium, but lack of punctuation actually changes the meaning of many of your sentences.

Concerned Parent

July 20th, 2011
6:52 pm

To those who make the off the cuff comments that the kids just need to do their homework and work harder…you apparently do not have a child in this new high school math program….i have seen many, many children who were diligent students….who spent many hours on their math homework…who still went in to take their tests and failed….I have seen many previously straight A students have to go to summer school just to pass math (and these were the kids whose parents could afford to send them to summer school)….I have seen countless other students who were not fortunate enough to be able to afford to go to summer school not be able to move onto their next year of high school because they could not pass this math….
and for those of you who make silly comments about these students- that they must have parents who are not involved….well that is a joke….i know there are alot of parents out there who do not care, but there are also a large group who do….I have seen these parents work on the math with their child, help them with homework, meet with their teachers, and still their child cannot pass….

so please….I am asking that not one more person make a ridiculous comment about the student just needing to work harder…..if not I will wish that Karma pays you a visit….and when you deal with a problem in life, and no matter how hard you struggle to overcome it and work at it tirelessly and still cannot achieve your goal……that someone out there will tell you that you just did not work hard enough

Old Timer Educator

July 20th, 2011
6:57 pm

There is nothing on their EOCT website about the 2011 scores. So, what does it mean “state releases EOCT scores?” Where? To whom?

OTE

metro atlanta teacher

July 20th, 2011
7:03 pm

Concerned Parent,

I have taught the new math curriculum for the last 3 years in high school, and I haven’t had a single student who fell under your description above that actually failed the class. Have I had students who probably felt that way about one unit or another? Sure. It’s okay for them to struggle and have it be hard for them to learn something on their own. Then its easier the next time they have a difficult concept.

Every kid who has failed my math class absolutely gave up and never came in for help.

TW

July 20th, 2011
7:10 pm

ANGELA,

Take a look at the middle school CRCT scores in Cobb, specifically Smyrna schools and those in East Cobb. Check out how the failure % in math is disproportional to other scores. While those in the lower socioeconomic areas score more poorly overall, they completely go in the bucket when it comes to math.

There is actually a good amount of brain research linking fitness to academics because of it’s effect on neurotransmitters (behavior) and the increase of proteins that accelerate circuit building.

When you get off your high horse, you ought take a look.

I don’t teach math, so I know little about it’s implementation. But you give me 50 fit kids, you take 50 who are obese, and my average math scores at the end of the year will be superior to yours.

Healthy communities = healthy test scores

teacher&mom

July 20th, 2011
7:33 pm

I wish the DOE would release the test questions to the public. It would help answer Paddy O’s question about the passing rates being acceptable/unacceptable.

Write Your Board Members

July 20th, 2011
7:36 pm

http://www.gadoe.org/pea_communications.aspx?ViewMode=1&obj=2054

System and school level scores not out for two more weeks! Maureen, given that the EOCT was administered and counted in the Spring for final grades, can you please find out why they can’t release this information immediately.

John Konop

July 20th, 2011
7:38 pm

A debate over Georgia math: Where do you stand?

……All Georgia students are now required to pass Math 123 to graduate from high school, which means they must complete the equivalent of Algebra II. That is too aggressive a goal for some students. Prior to Math 123, less than one-third of students were able to complete Algebra I. Those who can’t pass Math 123 are dropping out of school in shocking numbers, damaging their self-esteem and long-term economic prospects. Many resort to taking the GED, which doesn’t require Algebra II, to salvage their futures.

Math 123 makes the same mistake as President George W. Bush’s unpopular No Child Left Behind program: It’s unrealistic to ask all high school students to complete a college-prep curriculum. Some kids would be better served by a strong vocational and/or technical option.

Math 123 also harms teacher morale. It’s not reasonable to call our math teachers failures because they cannot teach every student Math 123’s higher requirements.

Math 123 leaves Georgia with an oddball math curriculum compared to other states, which puts our kids at a disadvantage as they compete for college acceptance. It has also created a nightmare for students transferring in and out of Georgia public high schools. That’s because it’s very difficult to determine where a student who is part way through Math 123 belongs in the traditional structure. Finally, Math 123 does not track correctly with the math skills needed to complete science courses such as chemistry and physics. Thus, students now face topics in science before they’ve learned the underlying math……

http://blogs.ajc.com/get-schooled-blog/2011/02/21/a-debate-over-georgia-math-where-do-you-stand/

Gwinnett Parent

July 20th, 2011
7:40 pm

It is unfortunate that some parents have to work so that little Johnny has food on the table and a roof over his head. They actually expect their child to learn something when they spend 7.5 hrs at school each day. Then when the CRCT scores roll around and the teacher goes through the motions at the conference and says little Johnny is up to or above grade level, the parents actually believe the teacher.

Those of us in the middle class/high achieving side of town, with 1 college degreed parent at home realize that little Johnny is not learning a darned thing at school. We are involved enough to spend the summer and after school trying to fill in the blanks. The reason why the 2nd graders know how to regroup before the 1st day of school on my side of town is because the parents are involved and have loss confidence in the teachers actually teaching the material. As mentioned by several other teachers on this post, we should conclude that expecting a child to learn anything in a public school is signing your child up for failure. “Be an involved parent” so that your child will know math is code for “Your kid won’t learn in my classroom.”

Old Timer Educator

July 20th, 2011
7:49 pm

Results have already been released to the school systems. Cherokee County already has their results posted on their Web site.

OTE

RJ

July 20th, 2011
7:54 pm

“…we should conclude that expecting a child to learn anything in a public school is signing your child up for failure. “Be an involved parent” so that your child will know math is code for “Your kid won’t learn in my classroom.”

@Gwinnett Parent, I have never read or heard anyone make such a statement. Your assumption that teachers aren’t teaching is part of the problem in education. First, in the 7.5 hours your child is in school, only x amount of time is spent on each subject. However, many schools provide after school tutorial for FREE! This would be the case in my APS school. EVERY teacher was required to tutor. Guess what? Only a handful would stay. Of those that stayed, most were already on level. Phone calls and letters are sent home to parents of students that teachers feel need tutoring, however you can’t require a student to stay.

As a parent, I am very involved in my children’s education. My kids are learning. Kids in my neighborhood are on level because parents are involved in their education, not because they don’t trust the schools. My parents did the same for me. Being an involved parent shouldn’t be a bother, it should be an expectation.

Absolute Racism

July 20th, 2011
8:01 pm

In Georgia educating the Lil Black Child has become a multi-billion dollars industry. Now, the whites wants to control every dollar, that’s the bottom line up front; ask Clayton County! Now them and their media will degrade, bad mouth, vilify and publicly destroy the Black educator. Bank on it!

Lynn

July 20th, 2011
8:06 pm

Where are the Math III EOCT results. We need to at least see the harm we have done to our guinea pig class of 2012.

Maureen, would it be possible to get the progression rate for the class of 2012 as they enter their senior year and compare it to the progression rate of the class of 2011? This would count the number of 9th graders enrolled in their freshman year and compare it to the number who are entering their senior year 3 years later? The number could be further broken down by the number of drop outs versus those who have been held back a year due to Math 1,2 or 3 failures?

I think the numbers would be shocking and would provide a real comparison of the damage that Math 1,2,3 has done to the class of 2012.

Veteran teacher, 2

July 20th, 2011
8:25 pm

There is no EOCT for Math 3 or Math 4, only Math 1 and Math 2, as stated in the article. I, too, have taught Math 1 for three years, and I have yet to have a student that was giving me his/her best effort fail the class. The test is difficult, but passable. I feel really good after looking at the state results. I am over 10 points higher, even when including the at risk and special ed students.

I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again. If the teachers in your district are not teaching the curriculum, demand that they do. I have been around over 30 years. The math itself is NOT that much different. And, in my small rural high school, the vast majority of the students graduated with Algebra 2 under the old system.

Cobb Teacher 2

July 20th, 2011
8:27 pm

Our biggest problem in math (at least at the elementary level) is that we no longer teach to mastery. We have so many standards that it is impossible to stay on one long enough for kids to learn it for the long run. Every math workshop I attend claims that math practice is no longer “meaningful” and that we need to create “real world” experiences in math. I agree, but that is application. You cannot apply something to a situation until you fully understand the process. For example, it doens’t make much sense for me to set up a class store if my first graders aren’t able to name the coins and their values. We need to stop putting the cart before the horse. Maybe then students will have a better understanding of more advanced math.

ANGELA

July 20th, 2011
8:34 pm

@TW

http://www.nature.com/oby/journal/v12/n1/full/oby20049a.html

Childhood Overweight and Academic Performance: National Study of Kindergartners and First-Graders
*****************************************************************************************************************

Please take the time to read this article above. You really need to educate yourself. However, I do applaud you for trying to hide your racial insecurities.

ANGELA

July 20th, 2011
8:39 pm

@Absolute Racism

I am beyond amazement when we as a race always try and blame the white man when we have done wrong. Get over yourself and do what is right. These people have done wrong to their own people not white folks. And, for the record I am Black (Paper Sack Brown) and loving it.

http://wpaopinionandthoughts.blogspot.com/
Check it out!

Concerned

July 20th, 2011
9:13 pm

What concerns me here is that, according to the article, 64% of last year’s Math 1 kids met or exceeded, while only 55% of this year’s Math 2 kids. That, to me, is the concern. This year’s Math 1 vs. last year’s Math 1 is hard to compare…completely different set of kids. But take (mostly) the same kids and watch the progression…that tells the bigger story, I think.

KCS

July 20th, 2011
9:28 pm

What was the cut score for Math 1? My son who was in Accelerated Math 1 received a 91 on the Math 1 EOCT, but failed nearly every test and quiz this year (and yes he studied and worked with a tutor all year). It is very difficult to truly know what standards your student truly learned.

David Sims

July 20th, 2011
9:30 pm

I don’t know why anyone can’t learn math. It just makes so much sense. All by myself, I figured out how to find elliptical and hyperbolic transfer orbits, their elements and all the necessary changes of velocity, given the elements of the original orbit, the elements of the orbit of the destination planet, a time of departure, and a time of arrival, provided that an apside of the transfer orbit occurs at either departure or at arrival. If I can do it, I’m sure lots of Atlanta students could too. So I’m mystified about what their problem might be.

Gwinnett Parent

July 20th, 2011
9:33 pm

RJ- I find it amazing that parents were much less involved 25 yrs ago, but the results have only deteriorated since. Today’s parents have been left to pick up the slack. You are one of the few that blindly trusts the system to teach their children.
Unfortunately for a lot of my highly involved friends and myself, we know the schools are doing a poor job of educating our children. “On level” does not cut it when our newspapers have to be written on a 4th grade level or the majority of public school graduates are forced to take remedial classes in college. I bet “On level” were the words mentioned to several APS parents during parent/teacher conference after the false CRCT scores came out. One has to wonder what these students grades were before the math tests. Was the student “on level” all of the years before the test. Also, did the teacher skew the grades with extra credit or test retakes to further confuse parents? “On level” loses meaning when the curriculum is changed on a daily basis and the students have not been taught the basics. My child has had gaping holes in her education over the years, which I have had to cover. She has always been a straight A student and “on level”.
Also, how can a parent trust the teachers to educate their children, when so many a quick to blame the parents for not teaching them regrouping or other basics at home? This summer several of my friends and myself are at home with workbooks covering next year’s material, so that our children are ready for school. Just have to feel for the poor souls that have both parents working just to pay rent or put food on the table. They actually think they can be just as involved as their parents were 25 yrs ago.

another comment

July 20th, 2011
9:35 pm

What ticks me off the most is my child going into 6th grade has not been taught how to figure out tip percentages yet. She thought it was acceptable to leave a 25 cent tip for a $3.50 smooth and a cup of ice . I tried to explain that she had been to low with a 25 cent tip. She said they hadn’t covered percentages. I then tried to explain she just needed to multiply the amount she spent by .15 or .20 to come up with the tip. It would have been 52 cents. She decided, her smoothey had to much chocolate in it so went back to ask for it to be remade and gave the girl another 25 cents.

I personally think that by the time you get out of the fiftth grade and you are old enough to get $5.00 out of your mother’s bag to get yourself a smooth from the snack bar, you should be able to figure out your own tip. Unfortunately, this new Math does not teach real life Math skills. Instead, they are teaching kids to use an arrow pointing downward as a place holder in long division, instead of bringing down the real number. Then my child fights with me when I tell her to bring the number down, the correct way.

Math 123, jumps around and doesn’t stay on any subject long enough. Especially where you have the 4 classes a semester, that count as a full year classes. This is a disaster. Parents who can not help their kids with this Mosh pit of this and that.

Digger

July 20th, 2011
9:45 pm

Math requires higher level thinking skills. We just don’t get it, do we?

Tip tip

July 20th, 2011
10:08 pm

This is a “tip tip” – for a twenty percent tip (standard, IMHO, but I’m a former waitress) all you have to do is double the numbers to the first digit past the decimal and add a 0 (not add 0). EX: $3.50 > 3.5 x 2 .> 7 add a 0 > $0.70 tip…easy peasy lemon squeezy.

Fifteen percent is slighty trickier, but not much, you just halve the digits and add the half to the original and take it from there: 3.5 + 1.7 (rounded) > 5.2 > 52 cent tip.

Ten percent shouldn’t even need to be explained at this point.

ANGELA

July 20th, 2011
10:12 pm

@another comment

That AIN’T a part of the curriculum…………..D…

ANGELA

July 20th, 2011
10:21 pm

@another comment

Who cares what your child tips a person. Please excuse me I did not read the entire post before I responded. Do not blame the school. You are the parent and if you had been more involved you would have known what was and was not covered. And, just for the record if students are not mastering one part of a math concept it is likely that the teacher will not get a chance to cover what all is to be covered. If you want to blame someone blame yourself. It is apparent that perhaps your child is behind because she did not grasp the other skill prior.

We as teachers try to make sure that majority of students have mastered a concept before moving on to the next. If you would spend less time blameing the teacher and find out what is really going on you might be able to help your child. The other thing is if you had ask for the years standards and curriculum you would have known what your child was to be taught and expected to learn.

Again, another parent ready to blame someone without the facts as well as not themselves.

Cere

July 20th, 2011
10:22 pm

@Gwinnett Parent, I have to agree. I was shocked to learn that my daughter was not directly being taught math facts at school. I finally figured out (on my own, with no direction from the teacher that this was my responsibility) that I had to teach them to her. Apparently, there isn’t “time” during the day to conduct rote math fact drills. (Forgive me, I had nuns. They taught us with drills — and games. We all know our math facts to this day. We can spell well too.) My parents never had much to do with my school work whatsoever. They certainly never actually had to “teach” me anything. Times really have changed. Parents, be warned: The things you “assume” your child is learning at school (ie: the things you learned in school) are no longer taught. There is some kind of desire for grade schoolers to have higher order thinking or critical thinking or whatever. This is fine, once children know the basic facts. Parents, please know, you will have to teach those facts.

social studies teacher

July 20th, 2011
10:23 pm

Anyone who is interested in what an EOCT looks like can go to the Georgia DOE website and click on testing and there are copies of released EOCT tests with keys. I think this link will take you there.

http://www.doe.k12.ga.us/ci_testing.aspx?PageReq=CI_TESTING_EOCT

Cere

July 20th, 2011
10:25 pm

As far as tips go, I believe there is an app for that!

ScienceTeacher671

July 20th, 2011
10:32 pm

“Our Mathematics EOCT results are showing us that some students are struggling with the more rigorous standards, which underscores the need for different instructional delivery methods,” said Superintendent Barge.

Actually, Superintendent Barge might be really surprised to know how many students still don’t know their basic multiplication facts in 9th grade.

Superintendent Barge should not be surprised to know how many students get socially promoted after failing the math CRCT (and the 8th grade one is written at a 4th-5th grade level), but maybe he is. Those kids can’t really do middle school math, and they can’t do high school level math, either.

And one reason the Math II scores are better is that the kids with no math skills at all are still in Math I for the 2nd or 3rd time.

irisheyes

July 20th, 2011
10:39 pm

@Gwinnett Parent, why are you teaching your 2nd grader regrouping before they start 2nd grade? We spend at least two months on it in the middle of 2nd grade. I use manipulatives, pictures, and finally paper and pencil to teach math. Sure, it looks like we’re going slow, and we are. Not every child picks up a math concept the first time it is presented. Sometimes kids need lots of exposure before they can understand a topic. Unfortunately, it sounds like Math 123 only gives kids a few exposures before they move on to something else. (I’m hypothesizing here since I don’t teach Math 123, and my kids are still in elementary school.) I think to imply that teachers don’t do anything over 7.5 (which is really closer to 5 hours of actual instructional time when you take out specials and lunch/recess, all important things in elementary school) is a little disingenuous. Teachers have classrooms full of kids who are at all different levels. Last year alone, I had a student reading above a 4th grade level and one who was still near kindergarten. Math was the same way. I had kids who easily grasped the concepts and others who I would sit and do multiple examples with, and they would still struggle.

I guess I’m confused about your complaint. Gwinnett has their entire AKS online. You’re saying your child has “gaps”. If you feel the teacher isn’t covering the AKS, then why haven’t you asked what’s going on?

em

July 20th, 2011
10:43 pm

I have said this before and on this very blog…Having been to EOCT question writing workshops and analyzed the results of my own students EOCT scores, it still amazes me that for a student to exceed standards the student needs only to get 76 to 78 percent of the questions correct. For a student to simply meet standards, the student needs only to answer 55 to 60 percent of the questions correctly. And that is after the removal of the 12 to 15 questions that are field test items.

Anonmom

July 20th, 2011
11:01 pm

My understanding is that then new curriculum (math 1, 2, 3 not the new common standards that are about to be in-coming) do not, I repeat, do not, require that the kids learn their “math facts” — there is no mandate that they learn their multiplication or division or addition or subtraction facts cold. My eldest (class of 2010) new these under the prior curriculum by 3rd grade (there was a chart on the wall and they got stars — my youngers ones, only by virtue of being sponges and listening to us drill the older one… it was lost from the curriculum. The high school math coordinator explained the ‘new’ curriculum that the kids only needed to “understand” that 5 groups of 4 was 20 — they didn’t need to know that 4 times 5 was 20 cold…. I call BS on that …you can’t do any higher math without knowing these facts cold. It’s a huge gap in the curriculum and, to me, chief reaon number one that kids going to Kumon and being supplemented at home are getting it and others are not.

Mandella1099

July 20th, 2011
11:09 pm

“I was shocked to learn that my daughter was not directly being taught math facts at school.”

Maybe that teacher needs some coaching. What do you think about that Cere(bration)?

metro atlanta teacher

July 20th, 2011
11:16 pm

KCS,

That is very possible, as Math 1 Accelerated takes the same EOCT as Math I, but went much faster. Math 1 Acc covers all of Math 1 plus 3 units of Math 2. See, the following year they will finish Math 2 by Christmas, and do all of Math 3 in the Spring semester. It is truly accelerated, not just honors or advanced. If your kid was failing all the tests and quizzes, he likely couldn’t keep up with the pace of the course, but by the end, knew all the standards for Math 1. He would probably do just fine next year in a regular Math 2 class.

ANGELA

July 20th, 2011
11:21 pm

@Cere,

I am learning that each school district has a different curriculum and that needs to stop. I teach second grade in Dekalb (DCSS) and it is in our curriculum to introduction at the end of the second semester (mulitplication facts). I just start at the beginning of the school year and start it as a homework assignment. I teach my students how to obtain the answers as well as provide a multiplication chart. I attach my homework requirements each week to those parents that provide me with their e-mail address on Friday or Sunday when I complete it-usually on Friday. That means that parents can start over the weekend with their child. My students receive their copy every Monday. I also, attach a weekly story that is extremly time consuming for me to develop questions so that parents can assist their child with comprehension. It disturbs me when a parent does not assist their child with these assignments. And, to add it happens more that they don’t assist than those that do.