HOPE Scholarships: A welfare system for Georgia’s affluent

Here is a strong piece by Hugh Hudson, chair of the Department of History at Georgia State University, on the need to restore income caps on the HOPE Scholarship.  Hudson is also executive secretary of the Georgia Conference of the American Association of University Professors.

He provides an historic view of HOPE, which, as introduced by Gov. Zell Miller, had an income cap so it was unavailable to Georgia’s higher earning households. With the scholarship imperiled by a budget crisis, Hudson suggests we return to Miller’s original blueprint.

By Hugh Hudson

The fact that the governor and the legislature are determining the fate of the Hope Scholarship is widely reported, as in the AJC story on the presentation by Timothy A. Connell, president, Georgia Student Finance Commission, to the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia.

What is being ignored is the threat that many of the “reforms” make to the original purpose of HOPE and the dream of former Gov. Zell Miller to move Georgia out of the 19th century.

Gov. Miller recognized that the Georgia of low-wage textile and agricultural work had ended, but the state’s view of education, particularly the view of those who controlled the legislature and the county courthouses, remained stuck in a past when the wealthy could send their children either to Athens, or North — even if only so far as Duke University.  Were Georgia to compete in the post-textile, post-agricultural world, then more of its citizens had to obtain the education necessary for success, and that education, as opposed to simple low-wage job training, was financially impossible for too many Georgians.

Thus HOPE had the purpose of transforming Georgia from a low-wage, low-education state stuck in the distant past to a prosperous, high-wage, high-education competitor on both the national and increasingly global stage.  In short, Gov. Miller appreciated that Georgia had to change.  And the key to progress was transforming the demographics of who attended college in our state.

HOPE has enabled wealthy Georgia families to use college funds for pricey cars for their college students. (AJC file)

The author says that HOPE has enabled wealthy Georgia families to use college funds for pricey cars for their college students. (AJC file)

Those purposes, and that history, have become lost in the current discussion.  With the removal of the income cap in 1995, HOPE changed from a means to transform Georgia into overwhelmingly a welfare system for the wealthy.  Data previously prepared by staff of the Board of Regents clearly proved the correlation between high-school GPA, HOPE scholarship retention, and family income.

In short, minus the income cap limitation, HOPE was not altering who attended college in Georgia, not transforming Georgia — in the main, those who retained HOPE had the financial resources to attend college and would have done so without HOPE.  What changed was the type of car in which “Suzie” cruised around Athens or Atlanta. North Georgia BMW dealerships have been forever grateful.

“Reforms” to prevent students who lose HOPE from being able, through hard work and increased academic success, to regain HOPE; to set a time limit, in addition to a number of college credits, for coverage, thus preventing low-income students who are forced to work their way through college from being able to complete their studies; and to remove remedial courses from HOPE eligibility for those students not fortunate enough to have attended the proper high school (also correlated with family income) that would have fully prepared them for college-level work; all of these so-called reforms work to perpetuate the present failing of the HOPE welfare system.

Georgians have a choice. Reclaim the dream of Gov. Miller to move Georgia out of its impoverished and economically segregated past, or continue to reshape HOPE into a welfare system for the upper and middle classes, a system that does nothing to solve the problem of low college attendance and limited success for all in Georgia. Gov. Miller provided the necessary leadership to prevent short-sighted greed from imperiling the future of our state.

Where is that leadership today?

–From Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get School blog

314 comments Add your comment

usually lurking

February 11th, 2011
11:33 am

Yes! I will definitely take advantage of HOPE for my children if it is available. But for the reasons stated in the article, I would not fight to keep that entitlement. But, HOPE or not, they will never get a BMW paid for by Mom and Dad. :-)

2 cents

February 11th, 2011
11:37 am

It’s gonna happen but what will the limits be? Will students in the ninth grade now be grandfathered in? Will any students be grandfathered in? Why doesn’t the state offer a prepaid/payin system like some other states have done? $50 to a $100 per month goes a long way

Come On Son

February 11th, 2011
11:43 am

This is long overdue but it should be on a sliding scale. Any student in Georgia that has the drive to go to college (with our low high school graduation rate) should receive some form of HOPE. At the same time, we can not continue this same standard of families who can pay more for college but use that money to finance exoctic Spring Break trips for their kids or as the article stated, above average college vehicles.

intownparent

February 11th, 2011
11:43 am

Doc Hudson… you forget that about the only thing keeping all those middle income and upper income parents’ kids (mine included) in Georgia at all is the HOPE scholarship. Take that away and Georgia can kiss those kids goodbye, most likely for good. TAs a result, you will quickly find that the caliber of students in your department will plummet.

I grew up in NC, and back when I was in high school, UGA was pretty much a laughing stock to folks in NC…. mostly considered top notch only for future veterinarians and forest rangers. I knew one girl who went there (to be a vet) and we all tried to talk her out of it. Now, thanks to HOPE’s result of retaining the best and brightest, including the best and brightest of the “evil rich” that have other options, UGA and is one of the nation’s top universities. Your own university is gaining a tremendous amount of recognition also.

Georgia and particularly its second tier colleges like Georgia Sstate…. just isn’t “all dat.” Most folks with other options won’t stay here without an incentive… if they leave, your department loses students and prestige. I know you don’t care about that though…. just sayin’

intownparent

February 11th, 2011
11:44 am

oops… typo… clumsy fingers.

flipper

February 11th, 2011
11:47 am

Income caps will never happen. It’s political suicide for most of our state legislators to even suggest such a thing.

This is forthe birds

February 11th, 2011
11:51 am

If you make the grades you deserve the HOPE. Where do you set the limits? Families with 6 figure incomes cannot afford college these days. On top of that, then what is the incentive of the middle class to send their kids to the second tier GA schools if they have to pay. I know I wouldn’t send my kids to middle GA and pay for it. There are better educations and college experiences available near by.

Good Parenting Punished

February 11th, 2011
11:51 am

As an educator and parent, I am enraged. Why is it that those of us (middle class), who have worked hard for every crumb on our table being punished again. My daughter has worked her butt off for her 4.0 GPA in a magnet program so that we would not have to pay college. But because I worked hard and put myself through school, pay all of my bills one time, and is stuck in a home I cannot sell, you want me to pay full tuition,so that some child whose parents may have made poor choices in life can go to school and not mine? When can I get a break in Ga.??????

Kelly

February 11th, 2011
11:56 am

As a college graduate and recipient of the HOPE scholarship, I disagree with this article. I was the first to attend and graduate from college in my middle class family and without this scholarship, I would not have been able to afford attendance to the GA school of my choice. Nor would my younger sister. I believe that in putting an income cap on receiving this scholarship you are punishing hard-working families across the state and furthermore, punishing those students who worked very hard in high school in order to receive this scholarship. Without HOPE I would be burdened with student loan payments and be forced to have a second job when I already work 50+ hrs a week. I would also like to point out that while the majority of my friends and college peers came from middle income families, I do not know one whose parents could afford to pay for their education out of pocket, therefore avoiding student loans upon graduation. Why should the wealthy and hard-working middle class be the only ones burdened by student loans?

NO HOPE, bye bye middle class

February 11th, 2011
11:57 am

If you keep taking away from the middle class, as seems to be the trend in every facet of government, then you say good bye out national way of life. Who will by the products and services of the rich? Who will do the work. This is just another example. Sure the rich (> $250,000 annual income)can maybe pay for college, but really that is such a small percentage it is not worth excluding them.

oldtimer

February 11th, 2011
11:58 am

Both of my children used the HOPE. As a teacher married to a cop our income was good..not good enough to pay the entire costs of college. There were many early years we barely could pay our bills, much less save. By the time our children were in college our income was certainly “too high”. Even with HOPE there was not much left over after room, books etc. AND, they certainly never had much to drive byond an old ford or toyota….

notrich

February 11th, 2011
12:00 pm

I thinks its more the Board of Regents fault for the demise of HOPE. They know that, with the HOPE, they can raise tuition at rates way above the increased cost of living and the money will be there. It has been their fat cow for years and they will drain it dry. There needs to be a limit on tuition increases based upon cost of living.

Dr NO

February 11th, 2011
12:08 pm

Some get food stamps, some get welfare and still some get BMWs.

It just goes to show their is a little HOPE for everyone.

catlady

February 11th, 2011
12:08 pm

Professor Hudson is undoubtably aware that in the beginning HOPE had a negative income cap. That is, if you were poor enough for Pell you could not get HOPE.

He is also probably aware that HOPE has been a destination-changer for some middle class students. Instead of going to a 2 year nearby, they went to a regional 4 year. Or, instead of going to an Albany State, they had the funds to go to UGA.

HOPE has helped very few kids who would have never gone to college actually GET A DEGREE (they don’t tend to hold onto HOPE for the 4 years).

The Professor’s own Georgia State, analyzing HOPE data, found that kids who don’t lose it are disproportionately wealthy enough to avoid having to work and go to class at the same time.

We all know that when it comes to HOPE, NO FAMILY can “afford” to send their child to college, whether they make $40,000 per year or $200,000 per year, they always have “other expenses” that they claim make it impossible to pay the tab.

Some states, like New York, are high-tuition states. They charge a high tuition but SAY they will give high aid to the poor, thereby subsidizing their tuition with the money of the wealthy. What they have found, in the real world, is that the money does not flow proportionately to its intake. The legislature hijacks some of it.

I recognize the inequities of HOPE (the poor pay by buying tickets, the rich play at UGA) but don’t see how we can have a merit-based scholarship that does not include ALL students who show the same merit. Now, if we want to redefine merit….

David Hoffman

February 11th, 2011
12:12 pm

The University of Georgia wanted to recruit Georgia’s top high school students to attracta better caliber of the professors to do research work at UGA to attract richer research funding. The top Georgia students, as intownparent noted, were going to universities and colleges in other states. Theere had to be a very big incentive to get those students to go to UGA. A no income limit HOPE scholarship was the way to do it. It was easy to communicate to the best students. If you are HOPE qualified you will get a HOPE scholarship. We will look at you more as a mature independant functioning adult in your own right than we will those who need to depend on a parents low income to get scholarship money. We are rewarding you for doing great in ACADEMICS. The program worked. I was on a flight to Chicago and talked with two mothers about UGA. They both had attended UGA decades earlier. They both said that they had told the highschoolers in their families that Mommy And Daddy would not be admitted to the UGA of today with the lack of academics they had back then. The children could not count on legacy admissions. They had to study and get great grades to get in to UGA. It did not matter that mother and father could afford to send the children to UGA. The admission criteria was much tougher. The reward though was a HOPE scholarship, attending college with people who were more academically oriented, better professors, better job offers during and after college, less financial stress during college, and the chance to be closer to family. Those incentives helped UGA do better as a university. It also emboldened UGA to take on the attitude that UGA was not capable of enough academic achievement to have a College Of Engineering. Many of the great State Universities have Engineering Colleges. UGA needs this to attract the kind of research grants and research facilities to help move Georgia into the 21st century.

Do not reinstate the income limit on HOPE. for you will only undo the great works that lay ahead.

LA teacher 2

February 11th, 2011
12:12 pm

I don’t have the means to pay outright for college for my son. Our college fund paid everything HOPE didn’t, but it will run out one semester shy of graduation. He has kept HOPE the whole time, and has taken some very rigorous classes. He has worked the entire time as well. If we didn’t have HOPE, he’d be saddled with huge debt upon graduation. I have one more kiddo to get through college and I’m saddened that the same opportunity is not there for him that his older brother had. My middle child received a full ride out of state…so I think I should get that money applied to #3, right? =)

jd

February 11th, 2011
12:12 pm

You know they are spending $250 milllion a year on HOPE grants to technical colleges — no grade point required. You can flunk high school and get HOPE— so much for focusing on keeping the best and brightest

jd

February 11th, 2011
12:15 pm

@notrich — Hope accounts for only 1 of 8 tuition dollars. Most university students don’t get HOPE — tuition has increased because the state has decreased support by more than 36%…

Futureteacher

February 11th, 2011
12:16 pm

This is ridiculous and unfair to students who work hard in school. While I grew up in a middle class family, my parents grew up in poverty. They made it very clear from an early age that the reason we can afford a nice house and family vacations is because they worked very hard, in contrast to my extended family who still lives in poverty. My parents taught us personal accountability and if we wanted to attend college and continue to have nice things, then we needed to work hard and EARN HOPE. Why should my parents who worked very hard for their success be punished and have to pay for our education? Furthermore, why should I be punished for working hard and earning a 3.9 in high school? Besides, how could I possibly afford to pay student loans on a teachers salary once I graduate? Should I also be punished by having to pick a higher paying profession in order to afford to repay future loans?

Dr NO

February 11th, 2011
12:20 pm

“unfair to students”

Hey big fella. Let me tell you like my mom told me when I was about 5 years of age. “Life isnt fair”. Now, whiner please grow up.

Steve

February 11th, 2011
12:21 pm

Two things to consider. One, Hope makes Georgia an attractive option for middle class families wishing to relocate. My wife(nurse) and I (teacher) chose Georgia over other states in part due to the availability of college money for our kids. Two, our kids that are top notch students stay home now and don’t go elsewhere due to Hope. Eliminating Hope for the middle class (under 150 K) will not only cause a brain drain from the colleges, but also from the state. Georgia NEEDS all of the well educated people/professionals it can get/keep.

...springs eternal

February 11th, 2011
12:24 pm

“…or continue to reshape HOPE into a welfare system for the upper and middle classes…”

So now the middle class is the bad guy. Let’s just redistribute some more freebies from the tax payers to the tax takers.

Maureen you starry eyed socialist, do you really believe middle class parents are rolling in so much dough that they should feel guilty for getting help from the HOPE scholarship? I say leave it the way it is, anyone who is eligible based on residency and GPA gets HOPE regardless of what part of town their family lives in.

David Sims

February 11th, 2011
12:28 pm

Hugh Hudson wrote (article): “Data previously prepared by staff of the Board of Regents clearly proved the correlation between high-school GPA, HOPE scholarship retention, and family income.”

That’s not surprising, since intelligence is mostly inherited. Intelligent parents usually have two things: (1) higher than average incomes and (2) smarter than average kids. And smarter than average kids usually have higher than average GPA’s. This correlation is probably quite high. But it isn’t doesn’t impute blame or indicate wrongdoing.

Because there’s nothing wrong with targeting HOPE scholarships mostly to the students whose academic records show that they deserve those scholarships because of their abilities. There’s nothing wrong with paying people who can do the work, to do the work. Right? Of course.

What would you rather do, instead? Shovel money at students who have proved themselves academic losers in high school, in the “hope” that they will become winners in the much more rigorous academic work of college? That strategy probably hasn’t a “hope” of success. Not that that’s ever stopped liberals from wasting money.

Liberals apparently desire a wealth transfer from the rich to the poor, while disguising it as a noble cause.

HS Public Teacher

February 11th, 2011
12:32 pm

The most wealthy demand their entitlements almost more than the most poor.

They demand HOPE for their kids. They demand tax cuts beyond what others get.

There is transfer of wealth going on – and it is from the middle class to the most wealthy. The problem is that the middle class fools in Georgia think that THEY are the most wealthy – which is a joke.

HS Public Teacher

February 11th, 2011
12:34 pm

@David Sims – Can you POSSIBLY stop with the labels? HOPE was not created by “liberals” and the “liberals” are not pushing to change it.

Jennifer

February 11th, 2011
12:35 pm

I agree – income caps – for sure.

HS Public Teacher

February 11th, 2011
12:40 pm

I feel that HOPE in Georgia should be awared to the student that qualifies by….

1. Showing academic success through a minimum HS gpa and also minimum SAT/ACT score.
2. Attending a real college or university and not some unrecognized place that is set up in a strip mall.
3. Having a net household income less than some maximum level. This level would primarily depend on how much HOPE money is available for distribution. The reasoning is that the more wealthy people are more likely to afford the expenses on their own.

Midtown Teacher

February 11th, 2011
12:44 pm

Honestly most of the time I feel Maureen gets things wrong in her reporting (especially on the APS Board), but she nailed this one. What she didn’t include, which adds to this argument is the high rate of minority and low income students whose GPA drops below 3.0 when they get to college and lose the HOPE scholarship. What this means is that rich students tend to keep the HOPE Scholarship and low-income students end up having to pay for college further distorting the income levels of students who are on the HOPE scholarship.

Now, before a bunch of people say that is because these students can’t do as well, let me say that I feel minority students get a disproportionately poor education and when they do get an equal education they are well prepared for college (see the results of low income students at KIPP Ways and my minority students were the highest scoring group of students in Georgia on high school science state tests last year).

I see two keys to solving this problem:

1. Make the HOPE Scholarship means tested but make income restrictions high enough to include 80% of families

2. Fix our broken public education. Low income children can succeed and can be prepared for college when given a good education and doing so improves our economy, our safety and our communities.

HS Public Teacher

February 11th, 2011
12:46 pm

@intownparent,

You are kidding, right? Are you really threatening that middle and upper class students will flee out-of-state without HOPE? What a joke!

Before HOPE, most of those same students did stay in state because in-state tuition is always lower than out-of-state tuition. And, many of them went to the highly respect universities in GA – and we do have some.

Stop with the threats. You make yourself look foolish.

DEBORAH

February 11th, 2011
12:47 pm

WELL I TO AM A PARENT OF TWO WHO NOW , IF IT WERE NOT FOR HOPE, WOULD NOT BE ATTENDING COLLEGE. MAYBE THEY SHOULD LOOK INTO THE SCHOOLS RAISING, AND ADDING FEES. TO ME SEEMS AS THOUGH, WE AMERICANS MAKE IT SO MUCH EASIER FOR OTHERS TO COME AND GAIN. LETS GET THE AMERICAN EDUCATED FIRST!!!!!!!

Excellence

February 11th, 2011
12:54 pm

Saw this in the vent: Every idea is being floated to cut the cost of the Hope Scholarship except requiring a student to be a resident (of the USA/Ga) and attend school in Georgia for more than 3 to 6 years to be eligible.

AJinCobb

February 11th, 2011
12:55 pm

I think means testing on a sliding scale might be a reasonable compromise. Any flat cap on income is unfair, especially to those whose incomes lie just above the cap. A sliding scale would allow us to prioritize help for low income families, whose need is certainly greater, while reducing but not eliminating the support to middle and upper income families.

Personally I would be very upset by any major change that wasn’t phased in. I have a junior in high school who is an excellent student, and our college savings regime has included HOPE in our calculations. (I’ve seen comments that families like ours are “greedy” or “unrealistic” but of course I don’t buy that. Why would any sensible person put more into a 529 plan that the child is likely to be able to use? It’s not like we have no other uses for the money, and we are not interested in spending our savings on a BMW.) Therefore, an income cap that eliminated HOPE for our student would be a heavy blow. There’s not time to set aside that much extra money before he is ready for college in 2012.

Solomon

February 11th, 2011
12:56 pm

I believe the income cap in 1995 was 100k. If an income cap was reinstated, I’m sure it would be above that number today. UGA (and other Georgia Regent’s Schools) are quite affordable to in-state folks. A family making 150k or more could easily pay for in-state college tuition. It would still be less than paying out-of-state tuition at UVA or Chapel Hill, so I don’t think the “the smart kids will head out of state” argument will wash. The folks making 150k a year or more who claim they can’t possibly afford to send their kids to UGA are either lying or they themselves have made poor financial planning choices. (The exception to this rule would be major illness and/or other unforeseen bills. Perhaps some of the “reforms” could account for catastrophic illness.) Instead of owning up to these poor choices, however, some in this discussion thread are accusing the poor of having made bad decisions, or not deserving HOPE.

That argument, too, will not wash. In order to earn HOPE money for UGA, one has to earn it. It’s not like UGA is just letting anyone in, you know. The “poor” still have to apply themselves, earn good grades, and save enough money to cover expenses not covered by HOPE or other financial help. When funding for everyone is threatened, however, it would be sound policy, as well as good human decency, to help those with the least. Folks making 150k+ can still send their kids to school. No one is denying them that.

MannyT

February 11th, 2011
12:56 pm

Looking at the HOPE numbers…

How much money & how many people are we talking about? Link shows year, # HOPE recipients & $ amount of HOPE

I recall a question about the proper funding of HOPE via lottery the other day. The 11th page of 19 in this PDF gives a good 1 page summary. Note that it is labelled as page 5 in the bottom right corner.

This should at least help to show how much of what pie is being discussed.

Welfare for the rich | OnlineAthens Blogs

February 11th, 2011
12:58 pm

[...] Downey at the AJC says legislators should bring back an income cap for the HOPE Scholarship, calling the current program “a welfare system for Georgia’s [...]

MiltonMan

February 11th, 2011
1:04 pm

Stupid idea at best. Let’s keep the poorly educated, poor students in state covered by HOPE while they major in liberal arts, history, etc and send the well educated, rich students back to other states because we want to ripe HOPE from them.

Good job on playing the wealth envy card.

MiltonMan

February 11th, 2011
1:07 pm

Making HOPE a needs-based system as opposed to a merit-based system??? 90% of most scholarships now are need-based.

amarie

February 11th, 2011
1:10 pm

While on the subject, lets address the Hope Grant, which is used by students in non-degree programs (ie Tech diplomas & certs). How about putting a cap on how much these students can collect which is reasonable, or doing away with it all together? Ive seen hundreds of students stay in school, take random classes, and ATTEMPT (not complete) multiple diplomas just so they can collect the Hope Grant. All the while not working, not pursuing employment, and supporting their 8 children with the funds? Yep!

bernlee york

February 11th, 2011
1:11 pm

Once again..totallu unfair. The middle class is what made the University system in GA what it is today, thanks to the HOPE. It is “discrimination” to exclude hard-working students with both parents working from this scholarship…A Better Idea..Drop Remedial payment of courses… and by the way…Someone please tell me how student who require remedial courses in college, how the heck are they receipients of the HOPE in the first place! How do you graduate from HS with 3.0 GPA and not be prepared for college! THIS IS THE WASTE OF HOPE MONIES…..not the hardworking kids from middle (and God forbid) upper class!

gbal

February 11th, 2011
1:12 pm

Absolutly nuts… Focus on reucing spending at the colleges. Like any government program, the problem is the spending. Universities licked their chops as soon as HOPE was implemented. Now to the point the HOPE has been milked down in value. Another income redistribution plan.

bingo

February 11th, 2011
1:14 pm

i have a dear friend and former professor from the terry business school at uga who echoes these sentiments. that HOPE is a program essentially benefiting luxury car dealers and realtors at lake lanier. wealthy parents save for college as they should, but when their kids make good grades – the hope golden parachute is a great windfall for hundreds of students.

i had to borrow and work my way through college without the benefit of hope or a scholarship, and now i have 35 employees and a multi-million dollar business. maybe it’s because of my work ethic that the HOPE program did not steal from me….

gbal

February 11th, 2011
1:14 pm

The $$$ is comming in for HOPE …. Just as usual a government organization is spending it faster than it can be printed. I KNOW… I use to work for HOPE.

Top School

February 11th, 2011
1:15 pm

This is how they work the system to get their kick-backs.
They did the same with the heavier axle cars to qualify for the lower tax deductions.
This is their intention for the voucher system.

The “SYSTEM” works to the favor of those elected officials and their supporters making all the decisions…HOPE …LOTTERY…GAMBLING OUR MONEY INTO THEIR OWN POCKETS.

http://www.TopPublicSchoolCorruptionAtlanta.com

Texas Pete

February 11th, 2011
1:16 pm

Most of the rich kids I saw at UGA were busy drinking, smoking weed and dropping acid on their way to mediocre grades. Most got their diploma but they hardly represented the world class students people like intownparent suggests.

HardWorker

February 11th, 2011
1:20 pm

True a family that makes 150k plus could afford to pay college tutition for their kids. However what people fail to point out is that people that make this income also have more bills. Yes by choice but unless they sell their house, trade-in their cars and stop supportng the local economy then how do you propose they pay for the tutition? Are we really moving towards an economy where everyone needs to live in the same-size house and drive the same car? What is the point in working hard?

Laurie

February 11th, 2011
1:24 pm

If a student needs remedial classes, do they need to be in a 4 year college? Not everyone is cut out for that kind of education, which is why some students who are granted HOPE don’t finish school. That money is wasted and would have been better spent on someone else. I get the idea of reinstating income caps. But there are bigger issues that need to be addressed as well.

Big Trouble

February 11th, 2011
1:26 pm

Best solution for HOPE I have seen so far:

Let the HOPE funds go to a “reimbursement” system. The student or student’s family will need to acquire funding for the first semester. If the student’s GPA is 3.0 or above (current HOPE Standards), then the student is repaid for the amount spent.

Students that are serious about college could build good financial credit towards their future; and students who are just there to “party” would not cost the system a dime.

Bell Curve

February 11th, 2011
1:27 pm

Means testing should only be part of the equation. We need to raise the bar and add minimum SAT scores to the qualifications due to the outrageous grade inflation. Tons of HOPE recipients have to take remedial classes and still more than 50% lose the HOPE after 30 credit hours. Millions are wasted trying to make silk purses out of sow’s ears!

Shep

February 11th, 2011
1:28 pm

Hey my parents bought me a BMW and sent me to Emory, no Hope needed (or even abailable … it was the early 80’s). LOL

East Lake Ira

February 11th, 2011
1:28 pm

Boy these folks that are so sure they’ll be excluded sure seem to be a bunch of whiny little beyotches.

I hope their precious little punk kids either fail out or are kicked out of college after three and a half years or so…