Legislature will consider teacher report cards

report cardI have been working on a column for the AJC’s Monday education page on an effort this upcoming legislative session to formulate a bill creating teacher report cards in Georgia and just chatted with House Majority Whip Edward Lindsey, R-Atlanta, about his interest in the issue.

Along with state Rep. Alisha Thomas Morgan, D-Austell, Lindsey visited Colorado recently to meet with the legislator there led a successful effort to pass a teacher effectiveness bill this year.

We talked about a range of education initiatives that Lindsey would like to see this session, including improving the substance of pre-k,  reviewing how much testing we do in our schools, enhancing technical  education in high school and saving HOPE.

But we talked mostly about whether Georgia was ready and able to rate teachers given the available data and all the controversies about whether such measures are fair:

His reply to my question on whether this was the time for report cards for teachers:

“If not now, when? We now have a situation where 50 percent of low-income students who enter ninth grade are not graduating. That is atrocious. We cannot allow demographics to control destiny. You have a wide range of people across the spectrum who believe that — from myself in the Republican category to the Secretary of Education to Alisha Morgan and lots of folks in between.

I am a great believer that given our present state of education nationwide, we need to be trying to figure out ways to move forward. Whether that means the present year or 2012 for all these education initiatives, I am about building coalitions and moving legislation. But I feel strongly that we have to move forward now. The status quo in education is not acceptable.”

Lindsey was not surprised when I predicted strong teacher opposition to public report cards, but said that he wants to hear from teachers.

So, here is your first chance to comment on this possible legislation.

– By Maureen Downey, for the AJC Get Schooled blog

304 comments Add your comment

What's best for kids?

December 28th, 2010
11:33 am

He has absolutely no desire to hear from teachers. He won’t read this, either.
Why is it so hard to simply fire ineffective teachers? This would save money all the way around. Why do politicians go around their a$$e$ to get to their elbows?
Fire bad teachers and be done with it!

d

December 28th, 2010
11:42 am

Just look at what happened to that teacher in California.

@What’s best – define “bad teacher.” If it’s based on test scores, you fail. Heck, my EOCT scores change from semester to semester. One semester, I can have 80% passing and the next I struggle to get 50% passing. Does this mean I’m a “bad teacher?” I had students coming to Economics this semester not knowing how to make a simple line graph. It’s rather hard to make sure you understand economics if you can’t read or construct a line graph, so I have to go back and teach those skills. When I am rated on my students’ test scores, it takes the ball out of my court and places it in the students’ court. I’ve had students tell me that there are teachers at my school – and strong teachers at that – that the students would purposely sabotage if they could. When you’re looking at test scores, even at the proposed 25% for EOCT, the required passing score is still quite low to pass the class. If you have a 75 in a class, you can still pass the class with as low as a 53 on EOCT if it’s weighted at 25%, at the current 15%, that number drops to a 38. Our students aren’t stupid. They know this.

I don’t mind being evaluated on what I’m doing, but let me evaluate my students and have a true objective measure of my performance decide if I’m a good teacher or not – not an objective measure of my students’ performance.

Late to the Party

December 28th, 2010
11:44 am

Fine…as long as parents are rated, too. Suggested criteria: 1) hours spend with student on homework per week, 2) number of teacher conferences attended per year, 3) time put into school volunteer activities per month, 4) time spent taking student to library, after school or weekend enrichment programs (music, art, language (including ESOL), math, technology, or other nonsports activities), 5) ratio of household income spent on student’s school activities and enrichment to household income spent on parent’s cell phone, hair, nails, shoes, clothes (should be greater than 1, obviously).

To those who say low income families cannot afford enrichment – poppycock! Art museums, universities, and public recreation programs all offer low cost, free, or scholarship based activities for youngsters on weekends or after school, and public transit will take you almost anywhere in town.

You could throw in parent self-improvement as well – it takes a good role model for kids to see that bettering oneself is a lifelong goal.

Mikey D

December 28th, 2010
11:50 am

I have no problem with a teacher report card, as long as it is comprehensive. In addition to testing data, which it will certainly include, it should also have statistics about the number of EIP students vs gifted students, percentage of students on free/reduced lunch, average work day from clock in to clock out (which will end the myth of the 8 to 3 workday), number of discipline referrals (which will show how many disruptions to the learning environment a teacher has to deal with), percentage of parents who refuse to return phone calls or come in for a conference… That would be a great start. But let’s not kid ourselves. They want to take CRCT scores, slap them on a “report card” and throw them out there for everyone to see because that would be 1. the easiest and 2. the most politically expedient.

I’d love for any of these politicians to come and spend an entire week in my classroom. It’s an open invitation.

ScienceTeacher671

December 28th, 2010
11:51 am

Maureen, if Rep. Lindsey is truly interested in the “50 percent of low-income students who enter ninth grade [and] are not graduating” the first thing he needs to look at is what percentage of those students were committee promoted after failing the [sub-minimal performance] CRCT. Between the AJC and the GaDOE, those data ought to be available.

I will note that the General Assembly is the body that enabled committee promotion to begin with, thus ensuring that students without adequate skills could be socially promoted without remediation and eventually end up in high school without having the skills to do high-school level work.

TopSchool

December 28th, 2010
11:52 am

It starts with ADMINISTRATION …
Let the public see what happens with Atlanta Public Schools.

This is the same old political beat…

And the BEAT goes ON and ON.. as long as the EVER-READY Battery lives.
An the Northside of Atlanta can afford to purchase plenty of batteries to keep your eyes closed.

I think the PROOF will come out when those within Atlanta Public Schools are criminally charged for the mess they’ve made from the ADMINISTRATIVE TOP…TO THE BOTTOM.

AS I said…Hide and Watch.
http://www.TopPublicSchoolCorruptionAtlanta.com

The PROOF will evolve once the new governor takes office.
If the public approves of the Atlanta Public School scandal… And Governor Deal does nothing to those involved…I would say it would be a waste of time to give out report cards to the teachers on the low end of the pay scale.

Another horse and pony show?
Hide and Watch

Governor Perdue’s office takes ACTION with APS
http://www.youtube.com/user/TopSchoolAtlanta#p/u/4/7ykbZYUIHRk

Just Wondering

December 28th, 2010
11:54 am

Although I support the concept, if he looks into CO, LA, and NYC have done it will always be an imperfect system. Teachers have no control of the quality of input (students) they receive each year and are told to do the best with what they got (less and less resources). A teachers “grade” will fluctuate year to year based on the students she has. Also, the more affluent districts will almost assuredly have the majority highest rated teachers because many of their students come to school with great pre-K, traditionally less chaotic social-economic life, etc. Using APS as example Sutton vs Harper Archer. A teacher at HA may just trying to reach proficient while those at Sutton are reaching for exceeds. Another question is will the “grade” factor in if the previous years teachers did an poor job (5th grade) that will reflect in subsequent years (6th grade+).

I agree we need something but we need a strong and robust discussion (with a lot of teachers) before we march off with another GA baked approach to teacher quality.

Dr NO

December 28th, 2010
11:57 am

It doesnt matter. With many students receiving NON-deserved passing grades this procedure will no doubt trickle-up to the teachers. Most teachers are no more than just enabling, gossiping, stupid women who wouldnt be qualified to manage the local soup kitchen or cook french fries.

And even if some of these self sacrificing martyrs does manage to score “F”s across the board, nothing will be done.

Just another Pig in a poke.

just browsing

December 28th, 2010
11:59 am

Any way they can- they will throw whatever and whomever under the bus to make way for cheaper, less experienced teachers. It is an absolutely atrocious and disgusting idea. Where is legislation being crafted to address similar areas? (Police, social workers, etc). When will they craft legislation to ensure the quality of what we inherently teach- or improve the communities we teach in? Stupid idea- the sad part is that they know it and continue running towards brick walls. We can be no more accountable than they can for the success or failure of the communities they represent.

Dr NO

December 28th, 2010
12:03 pm

You wanna see test scores and student learning improve? Well you pick the worst 5% of teachers at every school in the State of GA and FIRE THEM. NO counseling, no molly coddling, NO.

FIRE THEM ON THE SPOT.

I gurantee you the remainder will be scared shytless and improvements will be seen almost immediately. Hand-holding and hiney kissing does not work but you threaten someones financial livelihood and watch how quickly thing take a turn for the better.

ScienceTeacher671

December 28th, 2010
12:03 pm

My EOCT scores are pretty good compared to state averages, particularly considering the number of socially promoted, IEP, RTI, and SST students in my classes. (I’m not sure that EOCT scores are anything to brag about in any case, considering that a student only needs to get about 43% of the questions correct to “pass” but most of my students who can read and who pay attention do pass.)

I choose to teach the lower-level students, but if you look at the honors-level classes, most of those students could pass the [sub-minimal performance] EOCT with at least a minimal score on the first day of school, and after instruction most will – and all should – pass the EOCT at the “exceeds” level.

Under Rep. Lindsey’s plan, which teacher will get the better report card grade? The one who teaches the lower-level students and has some pass, or the teacher who has the higher-level classes where all pass?

TopSchool

December 28th, 2010
12:03 pm

RIGHT NOW, we have the entire APS system’s TEST SCORES in question.
We have issues of fraud and misuse of tax money.
The administration is corrupt from top to bottom…and someone wants to divert your attention to a report card for teachers?

Get your head out of the sand.

The real truth will surface when we acknowledge the real issues.
There is nothing going on in the Governor’s office… but the rent for tax paying citizens.

The Tax PAYING Citizen’s on the Northside of ATLANTA need to to stand up to the new Governor. Their Northside APS test Scores are not any more VALID than those on the Southside.

Shame on those that keep trying to dodge the CORRUPT ISSUES WITH ADMINISTRATION

teacher&mom

December 28th, 2010
12:05 pm

I fear they’ve already made up their minds that GA teachers are ineffective. They just want a “failing” report card to push their political agenda. They don’t want to talk to the teachers. They see us as the problem not the solution.

Of course, they won’t accept responsibility for their decisions or lack of decisions. Umm…just look at the thread about the HOPE scholarship and how the legislators failed to heed warnings from as far back as 2003).

I would really LOVE to have a seat at the table to discuss how to improve education in GA. I would love to have a voice in decisions that are made at the DOE and Gold Dome.

I don’t mind being evaluated through a fair and realistic process. I think professional growth is important and necessary.

I’ve learned in my classroom that a punitive atmosphere inhibits growth and learning. It simply does not work and it won’t work to improve the teaching force in Georgia. Playing “gotcha” only makes things worse.

Mr. Lindsey….you have the ability to invite the teachers of GA to the table. If you really want to push an educational agenda, how about visiting schools in GA and not Colorado? How about conducting district town hall meetings. Go to each local RESA and invite teacher representatives to discuss their visions for better schools. Ask us what we need! Don’t assume. You may find the answers you are looking for right under your nose.

ScienceTeacher671

December 28th, 2010
12:05 pm

National Board Certification is a national program (i.e., doesn’t require re-inventing the wheel) that has some research backing its effectiveness. Will the legislature consider reinstating the extra pay for NBCTs?

Dr NO

December 28th, 2010
12:06 pm

Perhaps if the Concerned Black Clergy of Atl were to lead us in a few versus of Kum-Bi-Ya things might improve. Im sure they think that would be a grand idea.

Maureen Downey

December 28th, 2010
12:07 pm

@Teacher&Mom, I think you ought to call Rep. Lindsey and talk with him. I am certain that he is open to talking to teachers and wants their input. Whether the bill that is finally crafted suits teachers is another matter, but I think teachers will be heard.
Maureen

Dr NO

December 28th, 2010
12:08 pm

” would really LOVE to have a seat at the table to discuss how to improve education in GA. I would love to have a voice in decisions that are made at the DOE and Gold Dome.”

Thats exactly part of the problem. Too many “know-it-alls” with stupid opinions to express that have no logic nor reason. Just do your job and let the grownups handle things.

What's best for kids?

December 28th, 2010
12:10 pm

d
Bad teacher:
Doesn’t show up for work on time.
Doesn’t meet deadlines.
Doesn’t show up for assigned duties.
Does allow for “free time”.
Does pass all students because they “tried”.
Doesn’t return parent phone calls.
Doesn’t post grades in a decent amount of time.
Doesn’t handle minor classroom disruptions (gum, talking out, getting up and wandering around the room, coming to class late, etc).
Does allow cheating.
Does sit behind desk while teaching.
Doesn’t align instuction with standards.
That’s a start.
If one simply looks to chronic tardies and chronic no shows for duties, one would be inclined to think that the rest of the school day is sub par.

dd

December 28th, 2010
12:13 pm

This is great news. Way too many awful teachers (my middle schooler has 3 wonderful teachers, and one amazingly awful one, who has been complained about for years, and had absolutely nothing done about her). It amazes me that people like her are allowed to continue ruining our kid’s education, and our government run/funded education system. Fortunately my wife is an ex-teacher, and can teach our daughter at night to make up for what is being done (nothing!) in the classroom.

I’m rated and ranked at work, as teachers should be as well. The ones on the bottom (and teachers, you all know who the worst teachers are in your departments) need to be put on probation, given some additional “help”, and then if that doesn’t improve them given “help” out the door.

What's best for kids?

December 28th, 2010
12:13 pm

What is Rep. Lindsey’s contact information. I will be happy to contact him.
Dr. NO,
As a gossipy, know-it-all, not good enough to cook french fries teacher, shut your pie hole.

Dr NO

December 28th, 2010
12:16 pm

LOL…atleast you are intelligent to know your place. Other than that no doubt your report card will reflect “F”s across the board.

Michael

December 28th, 2010
12:17 pm

Why does no one say a word about research we already know? You just gave Lindsey a sound bite that will resonate with his buddies who neither know nor care about what happens in schools. His first questions should have been where do kids go when they drop out of school…at any level?

In a recently released Economic Policy Institute Briefing Paper, written by prominent educational policy wonks including Diane Ravitch, “Problems with the Use of Student Test Scores to Evaluate Teachers”, both the Educational Testing Service and the Rand Corporation conclude: “The research base is currently insufficient to support the use of VAM for high stakes decisions about individual teachers or schools.”

Should teachers be responsible for the test scores of kids placed in their classes just a week before the test. What do you do with the inclusion classes? Some schools team-teach…so who gets the raise? We’re not testing first and second graders, so do those teachers get a bye? I guess it no longer takes a village anymore to raise a kid.

The US Dept of Education announced that Georgia was one of 26 states participating in PARCC or the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers and awarded 170 million to develop assessments. It will be interesting to see which testing company gets this payday. I am willing to bet my last three-year’s of merit pay (oh, sorry, there wasn’t any for us) that the new test will look suspiciously like the old test and important decisions about kids and teachers will be made on the basis of whatever they come up with.

David Granger

December 28th, 2010
12:18 pm

I think it’s fair to have report cards that reflect teacher scores. It’s important, also, to reflect student scores as they begin the year, and than again at the end. And teacher performance should be judged based on what they have to work with.
And we should also have lawmaker report cards. They should show exactly how much campaign contributions (and any other “considerations”) a lawmaker received from various industries and organizations, and exactly how they voted on any legislation that might affect those interests.

Springdale Park Elementary Parent

December 28th, 2010
12:18 pm

As a parent, I do want teachers held accountable in a quantifiable way, but I’d also like to see teachers evaluate their principals and other school staff members twice a year in a way that allows teachers to (a) point out all the useless paperwork and other busywork they’re required to do to the detriment of their main mission, and (b) gives them a way to fight back against petty tyrants.

Ideally, PTAs and PTOs would do the surveys, so that the teachers could speak plainly without fear of reprisal. In fact, all parent groups, including our own, should be agitating for this already.

teacher&mom

December 28th, 2010
12:19 pm

@Maureen….in the past when I’ve contacted legislators, I usually get a scripted response. “Thank you for your time and interest. We’ll take what you say into consideration. Have a good day.”

Perhaps Rep. Lindsay is different. I’ll give it a try.

@Dr. No — most days I don’t respond to trolls but here goes: You need to take your own advice and keep your stupid opinions to yourself. What logic or reason do you bring to the table? I’ve yet to hear anything of substance from you. Instead of making immature jabs, why don’t you give offer up a few intelligent solutions. BTW—firing the bottom 5% isn’t an intelligent solution since the attrition rate nationwide indicates that anywhere between 5-8% teachers leave the profession each year.

Maureen Downey

December 28th, 2010
12:20 pm

@What’s best: I would either call or e-mail him. Here is all his info:

http://www.legis.state.ga.us/legis/2009_10/house/bios/lindseyEdward/lindseyEdward.htm

What's best for kids?

December 28th, 2010
12:23 pm

David, the pre-post test is very cheatable. Tell kids that it has no impact on their grade, and they are playing bubble guess. We can’t grade them on what they don’t know, either, so what is the solution?
The answer is to see how they did from post test to post test, but that requires annual testing, which is expensive and time consuming.

George

December 28th, 2010
12:24 pm

Dr. No you are a dam fool ,you do not have a clue about what is going on in education.Education starts at home.The early years is very important to a childs educational process.We need to stop social promotions that is 50% of our problem.Discipline is the other one.The state can cut their budget in half over night.keep your daddys stupid bull to yourself.Go have a meeting with your friends.people like you make Georgia look dumber than it is.

Dr NO

December 28th, 2010
12:27 pm

Im not aware of attrition rates, however, thanks for bringing that bit of info to the table. I will be placing a Gold Star beside your name on the teacher of the day calendar. Feel better now?

5-8% leave via attrition…very well let me revise my number to the FIRING of 10-13% or we could increase that number of well deserved firings…no?

Lynn43

December 28th, 2010
12:27 pm

I retired six years ago after a lifetime in the classroom. Every new program introduced was to improve the education of minorities (do your research)-not children of middle and upper class. Very little has been done for them. Nothing we have been able to do has changed as it has only gotten worse. Until attitudes toward education, a government supported life, morals, and the 72% illegitimate birth rate is changed, nothing educators can do will improve minority education.

catlady

December 28th, 2010
12:28 pm

As long as the “report card” factors in ineffective parent and student inputs, as well as interference from administrators and legislators, I can support this. How will he do this? Should we expect, no matter how dedicated the teachers, with students from my school (70% free lunch, 50% single parent, 20% drug/alcohol abusing, 20% ELL, $28,000 average annual family income, 50% parents with high school education) would seem nearly as “effective” as a teacher in a school where the family income averages above $100,000, etc ? Yet many of our teachers ARE quite effective, coaxing a year’s worth of growth (if it could be accurately measured–another problem) out of students who come into third grade working on first grade level. Students who come to school reeking of marijuana smoke (from their parents). Kids whose parents have abandoned them to be raised by grandparents, great-grandparents, aunts, or DFACS. Kids whose goal it is to quit at 16 and work at the chicken plant. Kids who will be parents themselves in less than 10 years.

I get sick of folks saying SES doesn’t matter. If it didn’t matter, 75% (or whatever high percentage it is) of the HOPE scholars wouldn’t be from middle or upper class homes. Should we give up on poor kids? Absolutely not, but we have to be aware that they have many challenges to overcome, in 8 short hours a day/180 days per year, the messages absorbed the 16 other hours be day.

I spend every day not only teaching the GPS, but trying to make up for years of non-exposure to things middle class folks take for granted. Things you have to know to understand how the world works. Things you have to know to understand your textbooks. Things you have to believe in order to break out of generations of poverty and ignorance.

Measure that, sir, and we can talk.

Toby Cash

December 28th, 2010
12:28 pm

Sounds like our lawmakers once again have no clue about education. Perhaps they could volunteer some of their time in a classroom alone with students, not the best students but those who refuse to learn.

ScienceTeacher671

December 28th, 2010
12:28 pm

Another problem witih pre-post test is those students who are promoted to high school without adequate reading skills but without IEPs stating that tests will be read aloud. If the student can’t read and comprehend the pretest or the posttest, s/he won’t pass either, even if s/he has learned the subject matter.

Peabo

December 28th, 2010
12:30 pm

There isn’t a “quick fix” for the failing public school system. I was a public school administrator for 20 plus years, and every school I led made AYP (and there was no hanky panky played with test answer sheets). Currently, I am back in the classroom by my own choosing. Everyone wants to blame the teachers for the failing schools. The school is only as good as the leader at its helm. Most administrators take one class on teacher evaluation during their training. I have laughed at the inane comments written on my evaluation. In fact, my administrator never came into my room to formally observe me until the last two weeks of last school year. The problem is poorly trained school administrators who have been out of the classroom for many years. Clean up the school site’s administrative team and you will see the school start to improve.

What's best for kids?

December 28th, 2010
12:31 pm

Maureen,
I contacted Rep. Lindsey via email. I will let you know if he responds. I will not hold my breath.

Courtney

December 28th, 2010
12:32 pm

Teachers are NOT the problem. Waste at the county office is the problem, bad parents (or breeders), ineffective administration, and your kids watching too much TV are the problem.

Chuck Allen

December 28th, 2010
12:32 pm

As a retired teacher and principal I am opposed to a teacher’s report card. Education has gone downhill ever since the government has become more involved. If the government would provide the resources and support, then stay out of it, the educator’s could fix the problem. I possibly could change my mind if there was a report card for our legislators.

Maureen Downey

December 28th, 2010
12:33 pm

@What’s best, I called him today as he did not respond to an e-mail I sent yesterday. It may be that lawmakers aren’t checking their work e-mails this week. So, I would give him some time or call him.
Teachers who want to be at the table should let him know.
Maureen

Dr. John Trotter

December 28th, 2010
12:36 pm

I guess that I will never cease to be amazed at dumbass efforts from politicians to “improve” public education. No improvement will occur unless the lack of classroom discipline and the lack of student motivation are addressed.

I will continue to re-state MACE’s mantra until I am blue in the face: You cannot have good learning conditions until you first have good teaching conditions. Hey, Lindsey, the problem lies with the students and their parents (or lack of parents), not the teachers.

teacher&mom

December 28th, 2010
12:37 pm

@What’s best for kids…Most of your list is already part of my annual evaluation and my current administrator has written up teachers for several items on your list. Believe it or not, teachers who do not improve are not offered a contract.

Place a strong administrator in a building and the school will thrive.

Dr NO

December 28th, 2010
12:39 pm

IEP is the parents responsibility. One of my children was in the IEP program and I constantly was up at the school dishing out verbal harassment to these sorry teachers. Always with the “forgive me, I didnt know” response.

Well that wasnt good enough and after I began the public reamings and humiliation of the teachers in question thing vastly improved. Yeppers…I shamed and bashed them right in front of their collegues and others and it paid dividends for my son.

Plus I kindve enjoyed embarrassing, degrading these college educated egg-heads. Turns out they didnt know much about anything.

MattandJack's Mom

December 28th, 2010
12:40 pm

I’m in complete agreement with Late to the Party and Mikey D. By having a Teacher Report card parents are absolved from any responsibility in their children’s education. I consider myself fortunate to have a parent respond to a conference request and actually show up to the meeting. However once there they still expect me, the teacher, to perform minor miracles daily with a child who does no homework, classwork, is disruptive, and barely fed. I’ve had many a parent ask me to write down a student’s homework assignment in their agenda. At what point is the student responsible for their learning? As for returning parent phone calls, I’m sorry I can’t return your call when it is convenient for you (during instructional time). I show up to work everyday long before I’m due. I bring work home, volunteer at school, and spend far more of my money than I should to make sure these children receive a quality education. And some politician who has no knowledge of education to grade my performance based on test scores? That’s bull! During the ITBS this past fall I had a child to just sit there and refuse to work. Out of 8 sections he only finished 1 completely. What am I supposed to do with him? If you’re basing my performance on objective evaluations then perhaps that would be fair. I stress the word objective and add the word fair to the previous statement.

What's best for kids?

December 28th, 2010
12:40 pm

I’m in. I’ll call tomorrow, as I do want to be a part of this process. We need more teachers who are willing to stop complaining and start actually volunteering their time to be heard.

ScienceTeacher671

December 28th, 2010
12:42 pm

Maureen, did you ask Rep. Lindsey to come on the blog and discuss his ideas with us and/or respond to our ideas and comments?

Michael

December 28th, 2010
12:50 pm

People sure are quick to fire other people from their jobs. This report card thing is just another attempt at job evaluation that has been going on for the past 1,000 years. With this “new” report card we get hire new vendors to “study the issue,” more vendors to create the forms, more bureaucrats to review the data, and more Ph.D. candidates to write papers describing the data. It’s just another jobs program.

[...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Buffy Hamilton, Stephen M and others. Stephen M said: RT @buffyjhamilton http://is.gd/jE3k0 … must remember effective schools require effective systems, where teachers r 1 part of the equation [...]

TeacherParent

December 28th, 2010
12:54 pm

I have not seen this mentioned so I thought I’d bring it up. File this under the “unintended consequences” category that seems to be growing every day: if teachers are graded on their students’ performance, who do you think is going to go to the most needy students? If your income or job security is based on the performance of your students you are NOT going to go to the schools where students are chronically underachieving. Don’t you think this will just increase the divide between the haves and the have-nots? I see this as increasing the dropout rate of the very students Rep. Lindsey says he’s trying to help.

Gary

December 28th, 2010
12:55 pm

What we really need to report cards on our lawmakers. Most of the ones I have seen would get an F.

A ticked off teacher

December 28th, 2010
12:57 pm

This is a true story. I was evaluated by my administration to be a middle of the road teacher due to my lack of differentation in the instructional delivery process. 100% of my students that year (and close to a 100% in most of the other years) have achieved the following results.

1) 100% passed the EOCT w/ approx. 81% exceeding standards (it should be noted these results were not only from the high achieving classes but the regular class I instruct).

2) In my A.P. classes over 84% of the students made an 3 or higher (3 is considered passing)

3) In my team taught classes, almost 90% of the students passed the EOCT. Those who failed were in the high 60’s.

But somehow I am considered to be a middle of the road teacher. Although my husband laughed at the evaluation, do you really think I want this middle of the road report card to be made public? The report cards are only the reflection of an administrator who spent about an hour for the entire school year in my room.

P.S. this evaluation was supported by the principal. If this bill passes, you can go the bank that the number of teachers leaving the classroom will go to 5-8% + 1 teacher.

teacher&mom

December 28th, 2010
12:58 pm

@catlady…I work in a Title I district and I know exactly what you are talking about. SES does matter. Personally, I love working with low SES students. My best teaching practices come from working with these students. “Success” with lower SES students, ESL, and special education students can’t always be quantified by a passing CRCT/EOCT score.