And end to the DREAM for now. Senate nixes bill.

The DREAM is over. The vote today in the U.S. Senate on the controversial bill was close but it failed 55-41.

In his conference call yesterday with the press to urge passage, Education Secretary Arne Duncan said that the Obama White House would try again but this was the best chance to gain passage of the DREAM Act given the Republican dominance of  the Congress come January.

The bill created a legal path to citizenship for young people brought to America illegally by their parents. It applies to illegal immigrants who entered the United States before their 16th birthday. To qualify, they  must graduate from high school, enter college or into the military and stay out of trouble.

Duncan argued that the children of illegal immigrants should not be punished for the sins of their parents, and their ability to attend college was important to the economic viability of the nation.

The GOP senators weren’t buying. Opponents countered the bill amounts to amnesty for lawbreakers.

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-South Carolina, said the Democrats’ last-ditch effort reflected political expediency. “You’re not doing this to advance the issue. You’re doing it to advance your situation politically,” said Graham.

In a statement, Thomas A. Saenz, president and general counsel of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, said: “Democracy lost out today as a minority of the United States Senate refused to permit a vote on the merits of the DREAM Act. In the face of extraordinarily committed youth and a nationwide movement, obstinately obstructionist senators refused to allow a bill with obvious and enduring benefits to our nation’s future to move forward. Sacrificed to transitory and shortsighted political trends were some of our nation’s most critical constitutional and guiding principles. Enactment of the DREAM Act would have vindicated longstanding values that have served to make our nation great. This is a critical political moment, and the Latino community and the entire nation will surely hold accountable the political leaders who cravenly blocked progress today.”

72 comments Add your comment

scooby doo

December 18th, 2010
12:38 pm

“Duncan argued that the children of illegal immigrants should not be punished for the sins of their parents, and their ability to attend college was important to the economic viability of the nation.”

How about this – the US taxpayer should not be punished for the sins of the illegal parents.

Sandy

December 18th, 2010
12:38 pm

Whew!
That was a nail biter. I will celebrate tonight.

Fred

December 18th, 2010
12:43 pm

How is the US Taxpayer punished by this bill scooby?

Maya

December 18th, 2010
12:44 pm

Fantastic news for Americans!!! Now lets work on getting ENFORCEMENT of our laws against ILLEGAL aliens!

Just A Teacher

December 18th, 2010
12:46 pm

Common sense prevailed in the United States Senate.

ChristieS.

December 18th, 2010
12:58 pm

That’s just it, Fred. Those folks who get off on hating on brown kids didn’t know what was in that bill and had no interest in reading it. ::sigh::It was all about ‘amnesty’ for ‘illegal aliens,’ don’t you know. They could not have cared less that the bill was truly restrictive on these young people and that it was NOT going to give these kids a free college education or citizenship or preferential, taxpayer-subsidized treatment of any kind. In my 48 years, I’ve had the opportunity to see this country at its best and its worst. Here lately, the xenophobia has gotten so bad that it is difficult for me to recognize the Spirit of America any longer. It’s ugly out there.

scooby doo

December 18th, 2010
12:59 pm

Fred,
Subsidized costs of college education for minorities and low-mod income students, paid for with tax payer dollars.

Stephen

December 18th, 2010
1:03 pm

Its so sad, but apparently all these people that feel illegal immigrants dont help the country haven’t stop to look at the people who are standing outside the freeways asking for money. Last time i checked they are all “americans”. I mean, i know times are tough right now, but if you compare, i see a hispanic person outside the freeway selling flowers, trying to make a living, and i see an “american” looking like a bum with a sing on his hands sitting down asking for my hard earn money,… come on, who is the parasite here,….???

Cobb Teacher

December 18th, 2010
1:06 pm

Perhaps Congress can get to work on getting the unemployment rate down instead of worrying about politically correct seating arrangements.

Lee

December 18th, 2010
1:07 pm

Then there is this little gem in the AJC article today:

“Immigrant advocates viewed the measure as a step toward providing a path to legal status for up to 12 million illegal immigrants by focusing on the most sympathetic among them first.”

Did you catch that? A first step to providing amnesty for 12 million more lawbreakers (12 million is probably a lowball figure). That is what this whole debate is about – not the few hundred thousand students.

Dimocrats figure that the hispanics will vote as a block, much like the blacks. Their formula is simple, tax the producers to provide entitlements to the folks who vote as a Dimocratic block and remain in power. They don’t care if they run the country into the ground, as long as they remain in political power.

BTW, Repuglicans are only marginally more palatable than the Dimocrates, IMHO. I pretty much despise them both.

Chas

December 18th, 2010
1:08 pm

hey scooby poop are you mad because a more educated immigrant took your job??

J.J

December 18th, 2010
1:11 pm

i hate them too. >> Repuglicans and Dimocrats.. they should all go to France….LOL

Fred

December 18th, 2010
1:16 pm

Hey scooby. Grilled cheese on rye with a side of onion rings. Through in some yak dung as well.

Those things are as pertinent to the DREAM Act as what you posted.

I see the real answer is that you haven’t a clue. Thanks for the clarification.

@ChristieS: Yep.

Fred

December 18th, 2010
1:19 pm

Stephen

December 18th, 2010
1:03 pm

Its so sad, but apparently all these people that feel illegal immigrants dont help the country haven’t stop to look at the people who are standing outside the freeways asking for money.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

the illegal hispanics are standing outside of Home Depot offering to oad your truck and help you build whatever it is you are building……………..

note: I used illegal hispanics, because contrary to popular belief, not all illegal aliens are hispanics. Atlanta has a sizable population of illegal Africans, Asians and especially whites from Russia and northern europe.

Melissa Rodas

December 18th, 2010
1:25 pm

For all of you who hate immigrants think about where your grranparents came from and their grandparents and theirs. Unless your of native american decent someone was an immigrant in your family tree at some point. And if you want to say they came legally 100 years ago we welcomed everyone what is the saying give me poor your hungry…When did this nation dcide we were no longer a nation built on immigrants??? When the poor and hungry couldnt afford to pay for a visa that would be denied and the money not refunded. Do you like Mcdonalds or even fine dining like Capital Grill???? HOw was that fine meal prepared for you buy a illegal immigrant??? If you dont support immigration reform stop dining our at any food service, cut your own grass, fix your own cars, clean your own house, watch your own kids. Why because the people who do those jobs are illegals not because they want that job because it is a job because americans like myself dont want those want the job. I married an illegal immigrant who works 70 hours a week pays taxes anad takes care of my american child that is not his because her drug addicted american father is too lazy to work. Thans America for forgetting why Our Great Nation was founded.

Stephen

December 18th, 2010
1:39 pm

Fred. You are right, Home Depot or wherever you see them, they are not begging for money, they are looking for ways to make a living. The fact that they do good work and at a more affordable price is not a reason to be afraid people. And lets be honest, everyone talks about how the unemployment rate is high and all, but if you take the time to think who are the ones making those lines… “americans” , lazy, drug-addict, stubborn, no good… “americans”. If i loose my job today, im sure one out of the 500 million McDonalds in the USA is hiring. But no, better yet, lets stand in line for 45 minutes and have the “TAX PAYERS” cut me a check.

Stephen

December 18th, 2010
1:41 pm

….And after that i’ll stand in the freeway with a sign that reads ” i just lost my job for being late every other day, now please feel sorry and give me some of the money you made at work today”…

Cobb Teacher

December 18th, 2010
1:49 pm

Melissa: People don’t hate immigrants. They simply want them to come here legally. That is the difference between immigrants from the past and those of today. I am thrilled to have them here as contributing members of our society. I love working with them in my classroom and providing them with a quality education.

What I am not thrilled with are the illegal immigrants who come here with their hands out, complaining about the “rights” they feel they should have. It’s just not that simple. Immigrants of the past came here, fully ready to adapt to our way of life. They came penniless, learned English, worked hard, and advanced. All of this while maintaining their culture and traditions within their neighborhoods. That is admirable.

It is NOT admirable to sneak in and take advantage of our country and protest in the streets about how it’s just not enough.

There’s a difference.

Mary

December 18th, 2010
1:58 pm

The Dream Act was defeated because it had too many loopholes and giveaways (10-year work permit to anyone who applied), has NO enforcement provisions or penalties for those who apply but don’t qualify or who don’t complete the program. Additionally, it allowed those who achieve the pathway to citizenship the ability to petition for the parents who are probably illegal themselves and who smuggled the person in to begin with. Additionally, the example students trotted out in the various media stories are NOT representative of the illegal student population in general.

If there had been a dream act that 1) had a numerical cap, 2) took only the top achievers in high school, 3) required applicants to PROVE they qualify before receiving any benefit whatsoever, 4) required a 4-year degree be completed, and 5) did not allow them to ever petition any relatives, then people might be on board.

Additionally people know that many pro-illegal alien people see this as a first step towards a general amnesty, just as Lee noted above.

Stephen

December 18th, 2010
2:21 pm

Im impressed how so many people that seem intellectually literate, have so little common sense and talk about issues and things that they haven’t taken the time to analyze >>Cobb Teacher>> “People don’t hate immigrants. They simply want them to come here legally” <>> “What I am not thrilled with are the illegal immigrants who come here with their hands out, complaining about the “rights” they feel they should have”<<>> ” Immigrants of the past came here, fully ready to adapt to our way of life. They came penniless, learned English, worked hard, and advanced “<<< way of life? they were thrown in dumbells with one restroom per 50 people. They organized their own little towns, ex: little Italy, or you think they call it that because it looks like italy. Where do you think the word ghetto comes from?<<< Come on people education is not important, is essential..
And Mary, im not even going to waste my time with watever is it that you said. Just go to time out.

Stephen

December 18th, 2010
2:25 pm

WANT THEM TO COME HERE LEGALLY? … Have you checked on the restrictions for a visa application??
THE RIGHTS THEY FEEL THEY SHOULD HAVE?? .. They are called Human Rights. and i believe you are born with them.

TC

December 18th, 2010
2:47 pm

People don’t hate immigrants – they are just unhappy that there are so many illegal immigrants. That’s the difference. As an American, If I break the law, I must suffer the consequences. I think so many people are upset because ILLEGAL immigrants are breaking the law every day and not having any consequences for doing so. My grandparents immigrated here legally and that’s the way it should be for everybody!

ABC

December 18th, 2010
2:56 pm

I have never once posted a comment here, but I cannot ignore the unmitigated, blatant hatred that so many of you hold against children who had absolutely no choice in being in this country. You argue they can go back to where they come from. Yet, what are they supposed to go back to? A country they do not know where they might not even speak the language? As you sit in your church pews tomorrow in your fancy clothes dreaming about your tax cuts during a sermon about Jesus’ love, I hope you also find a moment to re-calibrate your moral compass to find some of Jesus’ love because your morality is grossly skewed. This is about children after all. The fact that you keep forgetting that is absolutely morally corrupt and disgusting.

Cobb Teacher

December 18th, 2010
2:58 pm

Stephen: Human rights don’t include a college education. Sorry. Human rights don’t include United States citizenship, either. I’m not sure you really made a point, Stephen. Most of your post is taken from mine and you restated your “Little Italy” line from one I already made.

As for the visa restrictions, why should it be easy to come to the US? Why should we not demand a commitment from those who say they want to leave their land and make a life in ours? It’s great if they want to bring their talents and skills and work here, but they must also be a love for our nation and a respect for our laws. I wouldn’t let just anyone into my house, and I feel the same about my country. Are you coming here to contribute, or bleed the system dry?

My husband is a mortgage broker and has several clients currently going through the immigration process. You might be surprised to know that it is possible to come here through legally. You can even buy a home if you provide the proper documentation. The fact is our doors are open and welcoming to those who have a sincere desire to live here.

As for conditions for immigrants of the past, you proved my point. It was difficult, to say the least. But it was a choice they made to start a new life, and many did so with great success. I would bet many of them were happy with the outcome and would go through it again to escape oppression and injustice elsewhere. A room of 50 with one bathroom was likely much better than what they were facing before.

J.J

December 18th, 2010
2:59 pm

TC, If an american breaks the law and gets caught, he goes to jail and gets free food and free clothing and when he gets out he’s got more connections and more balls for even bigger crimes. If an immigrant breaks the law and gets caught, he gets deported. So who do you think is more afraid of breaking the law?

Stephen

December 18th, 2010
3:16 pm

Teacher, you are right. So many of them did good and had success, so why can it be done again? i mean thats what the DREAM Act is about right, immigrants that want do better. Let me ask you something. Have you read the bill? or you just jumped on the blog?
Now for the record this is not our land, we all migrated here some time in the past, Don’t you think we should just kick out everybody that doesn’t love and respect this nation, including whites, blacks, yellow, and brown? or just because we were born here, we got the right to do whatever we want and blees the system dry ourselves?

Echo

December 18th, 2010
3:50 pm

@Stephen…pretty funny that you refer to anyone with a different opinion from yours as ignorant or uneducated when it seems that you are completely incapable of forming a coherent post on this blog. It is very curious that people who thought the DREAM act was great call everyone who disliked it “racist”, insist it is because we hate “brown children”, and lack “sympathy for others” (by the way it is actually EMPATHY, not sympathy).
The DREAM act was poorly written and should have been voted down.

Stephen

December 18th, 2010
3:59 pm

Sympathy is a social affinity in which one person stands with another person, closely understanding his or her feelings. Also known as empathic concern, it is the feeling of compassion or concern for another, the wish to see them better off or happier. Although empathy and sympathy are often used interchangeably, a subtle variation in ordinary usage can be detected. To empathize is to respond to another’s perceived emotional state by experiencing feelings of a similar sort. Sympathy not only includes empathizing, but also entails having a positive regard or a non-fleeting concern for the other person.

And i don’t remember anyone calling each other racist in this entire blog. Obviously everyone has different opinions, but it doesn’t mean they are right or wrong, they are just opinions.

Fred

December 18th, 2010
4:03 pm

Cobb Teacher: The children don’t have a choice. They are packed along to where the parents go. It’s not a blanket “amnesty” program. It was first proposed in 2001. It is for the children of illegals who have spent their lives in America living as Americans. Nothing is “given.” They ahve to follow a strict set of standards to qualify and remain. At the end, they aren’t “given” citizenship. they get permanent resident status. From there, they can try for citizenship.

The qualifiers are:

A. Must be between the ages of 12 and 35 at the time the Law is enacted

B. Must have arrived in the United States before the age of 16

C. Must have resided continuously in the United States for at least five consecutive years since the date of their arrival

D. Must have graduated from a U.S. High School, or obtained a General Education Diploma GED

E. Be of “good moral character.”

During the first six years, qualifying illegal immigrants would be granted “conditional” status and would be required to:
A. graduate from a two-year community college or complete at least two years towards a 4-year degree or
B. serve two years in the U.S. military.

After this six year period, those who meet at least one of these three conditions would be eligible to apply for legal permanent resident status.

During this six year conditional period, they would not be eligible for federal higher education grants such as Pell grants but they would be able to apply for student loans and work study.

If an illegal immigrant is convicted of a major crime, or drug-related infraction, (except for a single offense of possession of 30 grams or less of marijuana) he or she would automatically lose the six year temporary residence status and be immediately subject to deportation.

So you see, THEY have to pay their own way. no Gov’t assistance. I don’t know how the HOPE is handled here in Georgia, but I seriously doubt they would be eligible. Did you also notice the part about JOINING THE MILITARY?

ANyone that is willing to risk their life in defense of this Country has ceetainly shown that they are worthy of being at least a permanent resident don’t you think?

All in all, it was a pretty damn good bill to close a gap.

All above was just a small measure of the bill. There are many more restrictions like security check, back ground check, medical screening ect…………

Fred

December 18th, 2010
4:09 pm

How was it poorly written Echo? I don’t think that anyone who is against it is “racist.” I think a large majority are reacting from the mass hysteria gripping our Country against the illegals though.

But the DREAM act isn’t for the “typical” illegal. It’s designed for the children who actually call America home, because they grew up here. They have to be productive to enroll in the program. once again it would be a case of America getting the best, the strongest, and the brightest from other Countries. the weak and stupid stay home or don’t qualify. It strengthens our Country, it doesn’t weaken it. And if after they get this great education they go home what’s the fallout? They take their American education and their American learned values and they work to make their native Country more educated and less corrupt. That hurts us HOW?

It’s a good bill, that’s all there is to it.

Echo

December 18th, 2010
4:10 pm

Robinson

December 18th, 2010
4:16 pm

What a sad state we (US, and GA in particular) are in. This is such a short-sighted “feel good” decision for those who want to be “tough” on illegal immigration. Do they think these students will now just go back to where they left so many years ago? Those who qualify under this law would have become productive, tax-paying contributors to our society.

Fred

December 18th, 2010
4:22 pm

Yeah, I missed that and no it’s not the second verse for me. First time around. If you don’t wish to tell me how you think it’s “poorly written” that’s cool. But I’m not wading through 132 posts in a dead thread to try to excerpt your thoughts.

Oh, and Merry Christmas by the way. I THOUGHT I was done shopping until Fry’s called and told my wife that the TV I bought for her was sold out. Thanks Fry’s for letting her know lol…………. Now I’m in a quandary about what to get her. She said she would pass on the TV anyways…………. How do you think she’d react to a vacuum cleaner? :D

Fred

December 18th, 2010
4:23 pm

What gets me Robinson is that it was originally introduce by Orrin Hatch (who still supports it), and he IS tough on immigration reform. It’s not a bad bill. it’s good for us.

What's best for kids?

December 18th, 2010
4:27 pm

“Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”

scooby doo

December 18th, 2010
5:45 pm

ABC – guess what, there are colleges in other countries! Yes, it is true! The US is not the only country in the world with higher education! So, those illegal immigrants who want to go to college can do so in their native country! What a concept! Students go study abroad all the time, so why can’t an illegal immigrant return to their own country to go to college??

[...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Elbert Kosek, Mike Pratt. Mike Pratt said: And end to the DREAM for now. Senate nixes bill.: You are right, Home Depot or wherever you see them, they are n… http://bit.ly/gnhVVs [...]

Fred

December 18th, 2010
6:01 pm

Because Scooby, you ass, the “illegals” we are talking about haven’t been in other countries in their living memory. Not even their “own.” They think of this as their Country becasue this is were they lived their young lives……….

Ariba, Ariba!!!

December 18th, 2010
6:08 pm

Thank you GOP senators (and seemingly a few Dems too) for once again staving off amnesty for illegal aliens.

I will celebrate tonight with the No. 1 combination platter and a frosty Dos Equis @ La Cazuela. Ariba, ariba!!

Fericita

December 18th, 2010
6:12 pm

I’m disappointed this didn’t pass. It would have been a great chance to increase the Hispanic graduation rate and to encourage bilingual, intelligent students to be productive members of society.

Hyphenless American

December 18th, 2010
6:23 pm

The Dream act is simply a political ploy by the Dems to increase their voter base. Let’s celebrate the thousand of immigrants who became citizens LEGALLY (yes its possible) this year!

Mr. Saenz
Perhaps you need to be reminded of the words of a great American president.
______________________________________________________________________

Theodore Roosevelt’s ideas on immigrants and being an AMERICAN in 1907.

“In the first place, we should insist that if the immigrant who comes here in good faith becomes an American and assimilates himself to us, he shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else, for it is an outrage to discriminate against any such man because of creed, or birthplace, or origin. But this is predicated upon the person’s becoming in every facet an American, and nothing but an American…There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn’t an American at all. We have room for but one flag, the American flag… We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language… and we have room for but one sole loyalty and that is a loyalty to the American people.”

Theodore Roosevelt 1907

scooby doo

December 18th, 2010
6:25 pm

Fred,
Cry me a river. Make that the Rio Grande…

Fred

December 18th, 2010
6:52 pm

scooby? Do you always speak in bumper sticker speech?

scooby doo

December 18th, 2010
7:37 pm

No, Fred, just when I’m being called names.

You and others probably think I am a cold-hearted racist. Well, you’d be wrong. Through our church charities, my family donated to two charities this Christmas, one to buy uniforms and school supplies for a year for a child in Guatemala, and the other to buy clothes and toys for low income hispanic families here in the metro area. I believe in helping those who are truly needy. The DREAM act had many flaws, and I am glad to see it failed.

long time educator

December 18th, 2010
7:41 pm

This is an education blog, so what is the impact on education?
In Georgia, we are poorly funded and teachers are being furloughed. The challenge of teaching children who understand English is difficult enough. In areas with large illegal Hispanic populations the impact on the school system is financially negative. ESOL teachers must be hired and interpreters found to communicate with non-English-speaking parents. We generally use immersion with ESOL students and this works pretty well unless there are large percentages of Hispanic children in the same school, in which case the motivation to learn English is lessened. If they do not quickly learn English, they fall further behind requiring remedial classes or retention. All of these measures are definitely costly when tax revenues are down.
If they graduate from high school and take advantage of taxpayer supported grants and loans, they are definitely a drain on dwindling state funds.
This is not a black and white issue. I have worked with ESOL students and their families and have admired their 1950’s work ethic and family values. I would be proud to be neighbors and fellow citizens with the Hispanic families I have known personally. HOWEVER, all the jobs they do are not necessarily jobs no one else will do. This is especially true in the construction industry. I personally know hardworking American construction workers who cannot compete with companies who cut corners, break the law and hire illegals. With the unemployment numbers we have, this seems very unfair.

long time educator

December 18th, 2010
8:08 pm

One more thought, actually two:
1. The Dream Act probably could have passed if it had only stipulated the military option. Anyone who is willing to risk his/her life for this country should be allowed to become a citizen and I think most people would have agreed.
2. Fred, with all the quallifiers you listed in the bill, I think it would be very hard to enforce or document this law, just creating more confusion. We are NOT enforcing the qualifiers and laws we have on the books now. And this is all the more reason for the military option: easy to enforce and document. The military is good at record keeping.

Brandon Johns

December 18th, 2010
8:33 pm

Good, I am sick of these Democratic politicians putting votes ahead of national security and the LEGAL citizens who sent them to Washington in the first place.

Cobb Teacher

December 18th, 2010
8:36 pm

The DREAM Act certainly has some redeeming qualities. As with most pieces of legislation, there are several problems.

1. Any legislation comes with loopholes and earmarks. This makes it difficult for members of Congress to vote for it. It is possible to support the main part of the bill but ultimately decide that you cannot give your support because of small details that would damage the integrity of the bill or cause millions to be spent on unrelated projects. This isn’t often made clear to the public and members who vote against the bill are labeled as uncaring, which isn’t really the case.

2. There are some unclear things about this bill. Who is going to finance this education they are requiring? Student loans? Grants? Those are only open to citizens and students would have to BE citizens to receive them. Opening those options up early would cause many problems, especially for the many worthy students who are already citizens. It is not likely that many of these families have saved the kind of money to pay out of pocket for a college education. I noticed it says they would need to complete two years of a four year degree. What good will that do? You still don’t have a degree unless you have graduated from a community college. I can see it now….not enough students are taking advantage of this act for financial reasons, and Congress then wants to begin financing the education.

3. The laughable part of this bill is that these students would not be able to sponsor parents or siblings for citizenship for at least 12 years. These family members, now exposed as illegal immigrants, must leave the country for ten years to gain legal status. What child is going to expose their family like that?

4. The military option is a good one and should be further explored as part of a resonable solution.

5. The bottom line is that the American people are very skeptical of Congress, particularly one in a lame duck session. Congress has earned this skepticism and will need to become more trustworthy with our money before they expect support for their legislation.

Francis

December 18th, 2010
9:39 pm

Seeing that the Dream Act failed to gain enough votes in the Senate, it is now way past time that the 2006 Secure Fence Act was taken seriously. The provisions of the Act that were sacrificed soon after the law was borne by Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchinson (R-TX), Coyrn (R-TX) and the majority of Liberal Democrats. These politicians amended the bill by cutting funding, to the–REAL–border fence that never materialized. I’m sure now the propagating Tea Party will introduce the Double border fence, with the internal barrier electrified, which would be a major deterrent to the illegal immigration invasion. This would have been an Amnesty, through–CHAIN MIGRATION–for millions of immediate family members sponsored by students? A new revised Dream Act may pass in the future, without chain migration. I think most moderate Conservatives saw the seen, stealth and the hidden loopholes in the agenda. ALL THOSE WHO VOTED FOR THE DREAM ACT, WILL BE REMEMBERED IN THE NEXT REELECTION PERIOD IN ADVERSE LIGHT.

Additionally Senator Reid crushed a mandatory E-Verify program that was developed to eject illegal aliens out of the workplace, which has been compromised by fraudulent ID. Both laws could be greatly enhanced by the federal government mandated the 287(g) that gives enforcement authority to the local State, county and local police to arrest and detain. It’s time the federal administrations began immigration enforcement and stop catering to foreign nationals with public entitlements and mass amnesty of any kind. Now both Democrats and Republicans better begin to contribute to American citizens-legal residents, instead of special interests and open border zealots. Gain more understanding of the illegal alien occupancy at NumbersUSA. Annually most Americans are unaware that 1.5 million legal newcomers settle in this nation, with “god Knows” how many illegal aliens to supplement the irreversible overpopulation. Most legal immigrants are heralded in by the Microsoft Bill Gates of America, in lower wage jobs. So its hard for me to understand why these billionaire business owners don’t hire US citizens and green card holders already here,to fill job opportunities or even organize national training programs?

oldtimer

December 18th, 2010
10:33 pm

There is not another country on this earth that would allow people to enter illegally, get free education, and become a citizen without jumping through some hoops. Rather than college, we ought to work on a path to citizenship and then college. And it all ought not to be easy.
My ancestors came legally as indentured servants and through Elis Island.