Can schools pay their bills with more flexibility?

One of the most pungent commenters on education issues in the state is former Henry County superintendent Herb Garrett, who is now executive director of the Georgia School Superintendents Association

In response to the prospect of more school cuts and the pledge of Gov.-elect Nathan Deal to grant schools more flexibility rather than more money, Garret said, “We’ve been getting some flexibility now for several years and Georgia Power just won’t accept flexibility as payment for electric bills.”

The relentless cuts to education come at a time when the state and feds are making unprecedented demands on schools to educate more students to higher standards. Can those goals be met with the larger class sizes and diminished resources that have resulted from the deep cuts to education spending in Georgia?

That is the question facing our schools today. And it has a new urgency now that Deal says state finances are so bad that he predicts even deeper cuts to education.

Here is the latest AJC story on the bleak education picture:

Deal’s forecast — though absent specifics — came as educators across the state are still adjusting to major changes — such as bigger classes, condensed school years and furloughs or layoffs — that many districts were forced to implement this year to trim budgets.

Budget cuts from the state are not new, partly because of declining revenue during the recession, as well as austerity cuts that have been in place since 2003. At least for the past five years, local school districts have been shorted millions that they were due under the Quality Basic Education Act, the state formula for funding public education.

For the current fiscal year, the districts were shorted a combined $915 million. That’s on top of state cuts of $654.1 million in fiscal 2010, $93 million in fiscal 2009, $143 million in fiscal 2008 and $170 million in fiscal 2007, according to records of the state Department of Education.

“We’ve seen a radical decline in state funding for public education over the last seven or eight years, to the point that the state’s QBE funding formula has little meaning anymore,” said Jay Dillon, a spokesman for the Cobb County School District. “At this point, there are few options remaining if the state again decides to cut funding for Cobb schools by tens of millions of dollars.”

Since 2003, Cobb has not received $280 million that it was due in QBE funding, Dillon said.

Herb Garrett, executive director of the State School Superintendents Association, said Wednesday that additional cuts are likely to hurt across the board.

“It hurts everybody, but it really hurts the poor systems, the ones that don’t have a very good property tax base to try to cushion the blow,” Garrett said.

Since his election in November, Deal has been going over the details of an amended budget for the current year and a 2012 spending plan that he will submit to the General Assembly in January. On Tuesday, he warned that “tough choices” will be coming in education spending, though he pledged to give local school districts more flexibility with the money they receive from the state.

– By Maureen Downey, the AJC Get Schooled blog

105 comments Add your comment

blackbird13

December 9th, 2010
9:42 am

If we are going to get serious about education and competing with nations that are leaving us in the dust, and do it with less money, at what point do we talk about eliminating all sports programs from k-12? I have no numbers about what these cost, but at this point every non-essential-to-education program must be up for elimination. If we keep doing things just because that’s how we always have, we will fail to keep up with a changing world.

catlady

December 9th, 2010
9:51 am

Eliminate sports programs, eliminate “services” such as academic coaches, speech therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy, counseling and nurses. Yes, they do provide significant assistance, but we can’t afford them! Eliminate half of the CO jobs. Get rid of assistant principals, and terminate ALL travel and workshops. Cut the school week to 4 days. THEN, let’s talk about cutting teachers….

Just A Teacher

December 9th, 2010
9:54 am

Can the school systems sue the state for failing to provide QBE funds?

[...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Ed. Innovations, LLC, Maureen Downey. Maureen Downey said: Can schools pay their bills with more flexibility? http://bit.ly/ftTqdm [...]

Y oh Y

December 9th, 2010
10:12 am

Eliminate senior exemptions on property taxes. Property does not have a differenct age by property.

Extend sales taxes to internet purchases which are technically subject to USE tax. Make it simple.

End the Robin Hood method of state funds to public systems. Give every child in GA the same amount fo funds and we can eliminate the school ssytems that cannot pay for themselves.

Hey Teacher

December 9th, 2010
10:14 am

Flexibility does not provide funds for basics like dry erase markers (which I had to buy myself this year). I know of many systems that have cut ALL funding for basic supplies (pens, chalk, overhead transparencies). Field trips have already been cut in my system. Guess the next step is to turn off the heat!

Lynn43

December 9th, 2010
10:14 am

Just because a student can make a “nice” score on a standardized test does not mean that he/she is educated. We are charged with educating all students, and this means that every child no matter what his/her talent area needs instruction to develop this talent. We also need to prepare many to be ready to join the workforce as soon as they graduate, therefore, many technical offerings need to exist. We should be getting these students ready for life no matter which direction they may take, and concentrating on a few courses to pass a standardized does not prepare students for the workforce or to continue on to higher education.

Bruce Kendall

December 9th, 2010
10:17 am

Some of us knew in September of the coming cuts.

blackbird13 makes a good point and I briefly discussed that very subject with a local board member last night. What one may not understand or realize, the parents who have kids in extracurricular programs are very aggressive when defending their turf.

You could drop hard academic programs like Social Studies and hardly anyone would complain. However, just mention that you are considering reducing a sports program, and you will fill BoE meetings beyond capacity, with a need for police assistance to control the mob.

Why would elected officials fight for core academic programs, when it would infuriate so many of the electorate? They are not funding education now, and whom pray tell is holding their feet to the fire?

I do not know about you, but I will see one of my state representatives later today and will express my concern, and it won’t be for the first time.

TopPublicSchool

December 9th, 2010
10:28 am

Atlanta Public Schools solved this problem with segregation of Atlanta’s Northside Hispanic population.
Most of them won’t complain…as they are lucky to have made it over the boarder alive. Segregation on at the Northside APS schools. An idea created and implemented by the minority leadership in APS.
Figure this out…
Concealing Segregation/APS/Jackson Elementary
http://www.youtube.com/user/TopSchoolAtlanta and

Blatant Discrimination/Jackson/APS Leadership
http://www.youtube.com/user/TopSchoolAtlanta#p/u/7/0tCFMSuQBTQ

http://www.TopPublicSchoolCorruptionAtlanta.com

blackbird13

December 9th, 2010
10:34 am

“What one may not understand or realize, the parents who have kids in extracurricular programs are very aggressive when defending their turf.”

Oh, I definitely understand it. A parent in another nearby state with even worse budget problems than ours said she would put her kid in private school if they cut football or basketball. Interesting that those are the cuts that would motivate her to act, not the cuts to real education opportunities.

Student Advocate

December 9th, 2010
10:36 am

Speech, occupational, physical therapy and nursing services are federally mandated health related education services for students with disabilities to attend school per the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. These are not luxury services and are non-negotiable for school districts.

Gwinnett Teacher

December 9th, 2010
10:37 am

Not sure what this means to you guys. But I have been a northern transplant who came down to teach here in GA. I have aspirations of eventually running my own school, but will not here. We live in America and I understand times are tight, but to run an effective school is no different then any other business. It needs money. If the state govenrment will not support education then I will find another state that will.
I know I am fortunate to have a job and luckier then others. But to ask a teacher to compete with other states that spend significantly more per student is difficult. Here are 2 charts to look at. The first is from 2001-02 and then the 2nd is 05-06. Gerogia during that period dropped from 26th to 36th and have been cutting ever since.
http://www.epodunk.com/top10/per_pupil/
http://www.edweek.org/rc/articles/2009/01/21/sow0121.h27.html

I know things are difficult, but simply to offer tax cuts to businesses, just to neglect the fundemental educational system is crazy. Reducing the money spent per student is not going to pull GA out of the bottom of education.

HS Public Teacher

December 9th, 2010
10:38 am

What a question!

Let’s see…. without flexibility (which is what Deal assumes we had before him), the people in charge of school systems in GA awarded themselves pay raises and bonuses and cars and conferences and etc. All the while, teachers were furloughed, class sizes increased, teachers pay were frozen, etc.

With more flexibility, somehow money will be saved? Somehow the people in charge of school systems will make better decisions?

Wow! Is there any end to the stupidity of the republicans in Georgia?

ChristieS.

December 9th, 2010
10:40 am

Maybe when districts begin to close schools for lack of funding and someone’s little darlings have to get up an hour earlier to catch a bus to a school 45 minutes away, folks will begin to see the big picture.

What's best for kids?

December 9th, 2010
10:45 am

Hey, Student Advocate,
When we are spending upwards to 36k on an individual student while the majority of students’ funding is being cut to the bone, then we have to make some tough choices. The feds mandate a heck of a lot more than they subsidize, so we are in a bit of a conundrum, aren’t we?
Occupational therapissts can be given a bigger case load. Physical therapists can be given a bigger case load. Nursing services are NOT federally mandated, either.

Dr NO

December 9th, 2010
10:46 am

This is just another big crock propogated by these egg-head education enablers. Just as in business and everything else in life one must make do with what is available.

No doubt there are plenty of areas in which to cut or eliminate costs and why should Fed or State programs be the exception. Lets begin with teacher and administators and supers salaries…most of these are HIGHLY overpaid.

These pitiful arguments and hand-wringing amount to a mental landfill.

Dee DeLeGal

December 9th, 2010
10:47 am

85% of your taxpayers funds go to the funding of salaries in our schools then we want to complain about our children not getting an education. The problem is you can not get an education only within the confines of a building and classroom it takes the parents participation at home. Cut the sports and other extra curricular activities for one or two years to see what results you get from your students. If those parents want them so much let them pay for them or have local business sponsor them. As for the senior citzens remember they have already done their part by providing you with a place for your education not it is your turn to do it for your children. The free rides are over take a deep breath folks it is going to be a long one.

d2

December 9th, 2010
10:49 am

What about the Perdue appointees? How much raise did they receive? What about the ones from the Ag office? How much raise did they receive? All these created posts? How much does a “transition team” cost Georgia? How many advisers do we have to pay? What about the unecessary testing that is required by the state? How much does that cost? Do we need both ITBS, CRCT, and the bunch of others? What about putting a limit on how much a school county chief makes? What about the paid bloggers the state hires? How much do we pay for them? THANK GOD for the Football hall of fame.

Lee

December 9th, 2010
10:57 am

Sorry, no sympathy here. For years, many of us on this blog have been questioning our school system expenditures. Bloated Central Office staffs, $80/90/100k + salaries for folks that have no basis in market realities.

Interesting that the topic of athletics was brought up. Just this week, my hometown newspaper included a story of how our local BOE was touring the facilities in anticipation of spending SPLOST dollars. One recurring theme was upgrades to athletic facilities.

You’re furloughing teachers but going to build a new field house. Really??

It’s always interesting to peruse salaries: http://www.open.georgia.gov/

A few nuggets:

ESOL $110 million. There is a cost to having 20-30 million ILLEGAL aliens waltzing across our borders. Add another $10 million for INTERPRETERS to that figure.

In-School Suspension teachers – $21.6 million. For a glorified study hall monitor? High was $97k for one individual.

APS – Business Services Secretary / Clerk $92k + $16k reimbursement. For a SECRETARY????

APS – Public Relations $740k

APS – Security Officer, two made over $100k

Cobb – 26 Fin/Bus Svc Mgr at a total cost of $1.8 million.

You could spend all day on that site and find enough waste equal to the Gross National Product of some countries.

When they start handing out pink slips to head coaches, then I might say they are serious about cutting expenditures. Until then…..

catlady

December 9th, 2010
10:57 am

Student advocate: I understand that those are required by federal law, however, as I understand it the government is billed for those services by the provider, through the school system. Just take it outside of school, as it should be, and let providers come to the home. Providing for the child is a parental function, not a school one. Schools should provide educational opportunities, and any “impediments” (whatever they may be) is for the parent to take care of, with whatever help the government can give.

randome thoughts

December 9th, 2010
10:58 am

Public education should focus on providing the “basic” education to all students – including academics, arts, physical education. Anything beyond the “basic,” – including extracurricular activities AND advance courses beyond the “basic” – should be fee-based. Parents of athletes, bands, etc. already pay some to have their kids participate in those programs. I think parents whose children are enrolled in AP courses should also pay fees.

Speaking of extra curricular activities, I would support making those more of community activities – much like what you see in Europe. Let schools lease their facility to those community programs. Basically extend Little Leagues etc. to HS age groups, too.

Love conquers all

December 9th, 2010
10:59 am

To whom less is given, expect an increase in wrongful doings. In other words, if we are lacking in a good education what can one become without it. This increases the criminal mentality because they too(criminals) have to survive. I do not condone wrong by any means but please understand what we are creating in our society. Lack of funding in such an important aspect as education, while the rich gets richer is a very selfish and dangerous dream. In today’s reality, just continue to watch the news and you will soon understand that our duly elected officials are going about it in the wrong way. Everyone must be cared for, not just some.

blackbird13

December 9th, 2010
11:05 am

“Let schools lease their facility to those community programs”

Great idea. And if removing the sports programs from the schools discourages participation, that is all to the good; perhaps more time would be spent on academics.

teacher&mom

December 9th, 2010
11:05 am

I may be misinformed but most sports programs support themselves. Our football program (and we don’t even have a “winning” program), followed by basketball revenues supports all sports (middle and high school) in our county. We are a small rural system and a home varsity game will easily rake in $5-6,000/per game. Eliminating sports won’t solve the problem.

clueless

December 9th, 2010
11:05 am

Meanwhile, according to Georgia Public Radio, state revenues have been up for the past few months. But still more cuts to education?

HS Public Teacher

December 9th, 2010
11:17 am

@clueless….

This has nothing to do with state revenues. It has everything to do with the republican agenda. And, that is to destroy public education piece by piece.

The economy and state revenues are only convenient excuses for them – real or not. And sadly, the Georiga voters will simply accept whatever these republicans say…. and then blame the democrats.

blackbird13

December 9th, 2010
11:17 am

“I may be misinformed but most sports programs support themselves.home varsity game will easily rake in $5-6,000/per game.”

You do realize that the amount you cited would not support even coaches salaries? Yeah, I know some coaches would remain as teachers, but not all. Plus you are not considering facility maintenance costs, utilities, referees, gas for bus trips, etc.
You are also not counting things like facility maintenance cost,

me

December 9th, 2010
11:22 am

Lee – Hall County had a substitute teacher making 109K a couple of years back. Too funny!

An American Patriot

December 9th, 2010
11:25 am

blackbird13

December 9th, 2010
9:42 am
If we are going to get serious about education and competing with nations that are leaving us in the dust, and do it with less money, at what point do we talk about eliminating all sports programs from k-12? I have no numbers about what these cost, but at this point every non-essential-to-education program must be up for elimination. If we keep doing things just because that’s how we always have, we will fail to keep up with a changing world.

@blackbird13…..I think you need to do a little more research into sports expenditures at public schools…..the last time I heard, Ad Valorem TAXES collected from property owners for school systems cannot be used to fund extracurricular activities such as a football program……these have to be self-supporting…..this is why most high schools have booster clubs. Revenues derived from attendance is used to pay for uniforms, officials, field maintenance, etc. I say this to you and “Catlady”…..”this is not a very well thought out solution”

You know, right now our state has a budget deficit…..we’ve got to make it up someway or the other. I say we’ve got to cut expenditures across the board or raise taxes to get back in balance. School Systems are gonna have to cut out the fat…..all of ‘em have it, there’s just some tough choices to make and some don’t want to make ‘em.

Bill

December 9th, 2010
11:31 am

k-12 needs to be preserved as much as possible. But some of our colleges with only a 20-35% graduate rate after 6 yrs need to be closed down. Why pay colleges that let professors visit foreign lands for months and not working with students. If college professors do not want to work with kids we do not need them. They should put in 40 hours a week on campus working with kids.

DeKalb Educated

December 9th, 2010
11:31 am

In DEKALB County we could get rid of our TV show on cable, the people who run it and over half the Central office. When I was in school, we had two principals – not four at each high school. Eliminate bus service since we live in areas where kids can walk or ride bikes – much healthier, car pool or take MARTA if Mommy and Daddy can’t take them. Do we need so many security guards? Our local one has 2-3 guards riding around in golf carts. Have teachers who teach and get rid of the admin staff. No PR and Communications needed. Let each school run their own IT and get rid of area coordinators. Get rid of all coordinators – just let the teachers at the schools run their classrooms rather than all the extra layer of people paid high salaries just to shuffle paper and demand more paper from teachers. Without the micro managing, teachers can teach.

teacher&mom

December 9th, 2010
11:32 am

“You do realize that the amount you cited would not support even coaches salaries? Yeah, I know some coaches would remain as teachers, but not all. Plus you are not considering facility maintenance costs, utilities, referees, gas for bus trips, etc.
You are also not counting things like facility maintenance cost,”

You do realize that in smaller, rural systems (which make up the bulk of GA schools), most coaches (not “some”) also teach. Referees, gas, and maintenance fees are paid for out of the athletic funds….which is funded through ticket sales. Facilities in our county were built with SPLOSH funds. They are consistently used throughout the school day and on the weekends by different community organizations.

Mid GA Retiree

December 9th, 2010
11:36 am

So what is the answer? To stop cuts in education we cut or eliminate other state agencies? Which ones? Do that and the unemployment rate increases even more. Do we eliminate tax breaks for companies in Georgia? Do that and they go to other states, and again unemployment increases. Do you raise taxes on thoses of us that still have jobs? We are struggling to pay our bills now, increased costs for gas, groceries, utilities, etc. The property owner and worker winds up footing the bills for all of this. As a side note, my school system says it has cut positions in the central office, and eliminated teacher positions through attrition. I have walked through a couple of the schools in our district, as well as the central office. I have yet to see a single vacant classroom or office. I think that the central offices are protecting their own at the expense of the classrom teacher.

blackbird13

December 9th, 2010
11:46 am

Patriot:.”I think you need to do a little more research into sports expenditures at public schools”

This article is a few years old, but note that it mentions that Georgia football coaches are paid on average 55% more than other teachers (NOT including bonuses and perks from boosters), and a third have no other or minimal teaching duties. In no way do booster clubs and attendance foot the entire bill for sports.

blackbird13

December 9th, 2010
11:47 am

blackbird13

December 9th, 2010
11:51 am

Oh, and just to be clear, we are only talking about monetary costs, not the time wasted for students who have no future in sports beyond high school (the vast majority) and yet are spending more time on athletics than studying.

sissyuga

December 9th, 2010
11:56 am

Football is not a subject. Cut the sports.

God Bless the Teacher!

December 9th, 2010
11:56 am

1) Stop paying folks for advanced degrees in areas for which they are not employed (e.g., current science teacher (T-4 level) getting paid for a PhD (T-7 level) in leadership). Such people should not be on the gravy train, and the savings in personnel costs would be TREMENDOUS.
2) Charge parents for each additional year, semester, or class it takes for their child to finish K-12 in 13 years (on time).
3) Have teachers pay out of pocket expenses for having a substitute. Talk about motivation to come to work every day!
4) Charge for parking at sporting events. I’ll bet parents will still pay to attend.

HS Public Teacher

December 9th, 2010
12:02 pm

Cutting sports overall really doesn’t save big money. The reason is that because for the most part, sports are self-sustaining…. they can generate enough revenue to pay for themselves.

What does cost big money that is not self-sustaining?

Foreign language departments – some of these departments are larger than the math departments in high school. Few colleges have a foreign language requirement any more. Is it good to know another language? Of course. But if something were to be cut, then I vote for this.

Music and theater departments – some of these departments require a lot of money…. for stages, materials, teachers, instruments, etc. Is it good to offer these? Of course. But if something were to be cut, then I vote for this.

Special education services – most all of these departments are the largest in all of high schools. I know that the law has certain requirements, but if the State budget is really that tight then maybe these laws should be changed. If something were to be cut, I vote for this.

Physical education – these facilities cost a lot to build and a lot to maintain. Even though our children are obese, if their parents don’t care, why should the public fund PE? I vote to cut this.

What should certainly NOT be cut? The basics such as math, English, science, and social studies. These are the 4 legs of the education stool. These should NEVER be touched until all else is totally cut out first.

HS Public Teacher

December 9th, 2010
12:10 pm

@God Bless The Teacher!

Your #1 is already implemented. No longer are teachers paid for higher degrees unless it is in the area of their current job.

You cannot be serious about your # 3… Teacher salaries are already low. And, they have been frozen for some time. And, teachers have been forloughed (work with no pay). And, teachers regularly pay for classroom supplies out-of-pocket due to cut backs. And, now you want a sick teacher to pay out-of-pocket for a substitute? Talk about rubbing salt into a wound! I think that this would create an even more severe teacher shortage of good/qualified teachers – who the heck would ever go in to such a profession????

say what?

December 9th, 2010
12:15 pm

@Dekalb educated- yep kids needs to walk on those newly installed sidewalks that Vernon Jones paid for with SPLOst funds. I see buses with 15-25 kids leaving the building. Buses need to be filled to capacity for better ROI. There have always been 3-4 APs in DeKalb schools ( I graduated in the 80s). Now what I don’t agree with is the AP of instruction, AP for Test administration, AP for each grade academy,etc. Since so many APs and Principals are always giving homage to the teaching staff they should be glad to get back in the classroom with all of the stellar knowledge they have received from on high. As contracts are annually, this is the year to give those APs a contract back into the classroom. The TV station could be privatized as I can not see much of what they do for the salaries.

School systems do need to review what is paid by the state and federal govt’, which are mandated services, and see where we can trim.

@Catlady- your attitude toward Special Needs students is the reason why there are so many mandates and lawsuits. But you are not alone; a DCSS BOE member says just the same (paraphrasing here: DCSS will never be good again because of special needs students). These attitudes of indifference toward those who are not like you will always be cause for policies on funding formulas, and who gets what. If it was not mandated that 1% of Title I funds be for parent involvement activities, that money would be spent on ribeye dinners for teacher appreciation (as was in the past).
And Parents are ultimately responsible for the education of the student, not the teacher. So how about we shut down public schools, make this a Homeschooling STATE, allowing teachers to practice their wares as tutor?

HS Public Teacher

December 9th, 2010
12:16 pm

@God Bless The Teacher!

I wonder why your suggestions did not include….

Cut pay of superintendents making more than $200,000 per year. Some of these jokers make almost half a million a year!

Cut all tax payer perks such as: free car, free trips to administration conferences (think Hawaii), sometimes two personal secretaries, etc.

Why do you immediately go to the pitiful front-line worker that is already abused?

teacher&mom

December 9th, 2010
12:21 pm

“3) Have teachers pay out of pocket expenses for having a substitute. Talk about motivation to come to work every day!”

Really??? So when my child was hospitalized last year, I should have dumped him off at the hospital and gone to work? What about funerals for parents/grandparents? Unfortunately I’ve already had the flu this year. Should I have come in to work during that time?

blackbird13

December 9th, 2010
12:28 pm

“Cutting sports overall really doesn’t save big money. The reason is that because for the most part, sports are self-sustaining…. they can generate enough revenue to pay for themselves.”

But if jobs have to go, the jobs related to them should be the first to go. Most coaches teach p.e., which, again, if cuts have to be made, should also be the first to go. In fact, those cuts should have been made already.

God Bless the Teacher!

December 9th, 2010
12:38 pm

@ HS Public Teacher. I’m a teacher, and I know for a fact in my county teachers are grandfathered in to get paid according to the highest degree earned, regardless of current position. Many systems do this (I’ve work in three, and all three are doing it).

@ teach&mom. Just throwing out options. Do you honestly think any BOE will vote to cut athletics?

Sorry, Wrong Answer

December 9th, 2010
12:40 pm

@Teacher&Mom… Your numbers on sports programs being self-supporting don’t add up. You say you can gross $5,000 per varsity game. Let’s say your school plays 7 home games, or even 10 if you are in playoffs, so that’s $35,000 to $50,000, which pays for field and team equipment, field maintenance and utilities, concession licenses and health inspection, salaries for the head coach, assistant coaches, expendables like trainers supplies, chalk, stat sheets, etc., referee fees, summer and spring training, football team’s share of weight room facilities cost, and public safety (off duty police for crowd control).

This cash flow ($50,000 in, $200,000 out) rivals the miracle of the loaves and fishes. Maybe your athletic association should be managing the DOE budget.

blackbird13

December 9th, 2010
12:44 pm

“Do you honestly think any BOE will vote to cut athletics?”

Nope. But it needs to be pointed out, no matter how futile it is, that the priorities of our education system are completely out of whack, regardless of budgetary concerns.

blackbird13

December 9th, 2010
12:48 pm

@Sorry, Wrong Answer

It sure doesn’t add it up because it isn’t including salaries, which are higher than for other teachers. Go look at the audit reports. How many of these coaches are teaching anything else or are monitoring dodge ball games for a few hours?

HS Math Teacher

December 9th, 2010
12:52 pm

Maybe it’s time for the Gov. to propose a temporary state sales tax hike. When most systems have already cut to the bone, you’ve got to look at the revenue side of the equation. I don’t think any additional burden should be put squarely on property owners, especially in the poorer regions of the state.

TopPublicSchool

December 9th, 2010
12:55 pm

I did contact the Governor’s office…
Of course there is so much politics involved in this.
The GBI will not investigate possible misuse of funds by APS until a police report has been filed to them from the Atlanta Police Department

I called the Atlanta Police Department to report my concern.

They said…they do not handle anything to do with Atlanta Public Schools.
All of the issues involving APS are to be reported to the Atlanta Public Schools, Detective Unit.

I think this is TOTAL CORRUPTION.

Reporting possible wrong-doing to anyone holding hands with APS would not produce a fair investigation.

So, What to do now?
Any suggestions?

I hope someone within Governor Perdue’s office will investigate the information detailed on the Youtube Channel:

http://www.youtube.com/user/TopSchoolAtlanta#p/u
Concealing Segregation in Atlanta Public Schools

http://www.youtube.com/user/TopSchoolAtlanta#p/u/7/0tCFMSuQBTQ
Blatant Discrimination/Jackson/APS Leadership

The disgraceful leadership within Atlanta Public Schools under the umbrella of Dr. Beverly Hall has soiled our reputations as citizens of Atlanta, Georgia.

I am asking the governor to open a full investigation to unravel ALL PROBLEMS with the possible misuse of public funds and the possible segregation of our children in the Northside schools of APS.

http://www.TopPublicSchoolCorruptionAtlanta.com