Peachtree City middle school meanness: Symptom of a culture gone awry or parents gone AWOL?

When the movie "Mean Girls" was made, kids still whispered rumors about one another. Now, the web delivers such poison in a far more efficient and expedited way. (Photo/Paramount)

When the movie "Mean Girls" was made, kids still whispered rumors about one another. Now, the web delivers such poison in a far more efficient and expedited way. (Photo/Paramount)

Apparently, some web savvy adolescents at J.C. Booth Middle School in Peachtree City created a site that listed the school’s best-looking and popular kids as well as those they suspected of being gay.

I am delighted that the school found out about the site and moved quickly to talk to students about its implications. There’s nothing new about middle school students rating who’s attractive and who’s liked.

But there are two new forces at play today that make such lists more problematic than 30 years ago: The culture itself re-inforces the social poison of middle school and the web delivers it with lightning speed.

I also wonder if parents contribute to the problem by allowing their children unfettered access to computers. I have found that some parents prefer their children be the alpha students making such lists rather than the ones who end up on the lists. (One of the surprises of my parenting life has been how invested mothers become  in their children’s social standing, probably because my own mother did not get involved at all.)

This story is from 11-Alive News news:

According to a letter sent to parents by principal Ted Lombard, someone created a site called “Booth Middle School Lists”, which included names under categories such as “Most Popular” and “Best Looking.”

The letter states that the site also listed ten names under a heading that included a crass term questioning the student’s sexual orientation. There was a picture of one student stamped with the same crass term.

“I wouldn’t know where to begin to tap into something like that and start posting things about people,” said parent Jill Burke. “They’re pretty bold.”

Parents waiting for their students to leave school Tuesday afternoon expressed outrage at the creator of the site.

“I think it’s horrible,” said Audrey Fincher. “There should be some serious repercussions.”

Administrators found out about the site last Thursday, and on Friday notified parents whose children were named. On Monday, the school held an assembly to discuss the site and assure students that the school was working to determine who created it.

The letter states that part of the site listed the first names of the people who allegedly created it, names that could possibly be linked to two 8th grade boys at the school.

Peachtree City Police are investigating to determine who created the web site, and if any laws were broken.

I also want to share an excerpt from a recent New York Times story about a topic that we have been discussing here on the Get Schooled blog –  how much the culture contributes to the  “mean girl” persona, now a staple in children’s TV, even the Disney channel.

According to the Times story:

Mean-girl behavior, typically referred to by professionals as relational or social aggression and by terrified parents as bullying, has existed for as long as there have been ponytails to pull and notes to pass (today’s insults are texted instead). But while the calculated round of cliquishness and exclusion used to set in over fifth-grade sleepover parties, warfare increasingly permeates the early elementary school years.

“Girls absolutely exclude one another in kindergarten,” said Michelle Anthony, a psychologist and co-author of the new book “Little Girls Can Be Mean.” When her own daughter was manipulated by a “friend” into racing down a slide booby-trapped with mud, making it appear to a group of boys as though she’d soiled her pants, Dr. Anthony was taken aback. “You don’t expect to run into that level of meanness in a 7-year-old.”

But at a time when teenage cyber-bullying is making headlines, parents fear that the onset of bullying behavior is trickling down. According to a new Harris survey of 1,144 parents nationwide, 67 percent of parents of 3- to 7-year-olds worry that their children will be bullied; parents of preschoolers and grade-school-age children are significantly more likely to worry than parents of teenagers. Such fears may be justified. One recent survey of 273 third graders in Massachusetts found that 47 percent have been bullied at least once; 52 percent reported being called mean names, being made fun of or teased in a hurtful way; and 51 percent reported being left out of things on purpose, excluded from their group of friends or completely ignored at least once in the past couple of months.

“The research literature on aggression is very clear that with relational aggression, it’s monkey see, money do,” said Tracy Vaillancourt, who specializes in children’s mental health and violence prevention at the University of Ottawa. “Kids mirror the larger culture, from reality TV to materialism.”We no longer live in the pigtailed world of Cindy Brady where a handful of channels import variations on sugar and spice, with prompt repercussions for the latter. “So much of what passes for entertainment is about being rude, nasty and crass,” said Meline Kevorkian, who studies bullying at Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale-Davie, Fla. “What we see as comedy is actually making fun of other people.”

Nicole Martins, a professor of telecommunications at Indiana University, has conducted a study linking aggressive behavior to shows with stars she deemed socially aggressive, like “Hannah Montana” and “The Simple Life.” “There was no effect on aggression on boys, but in girls, there was an increase among those who watched socially aggressive female models on TV,” Dr. Martins said.

129 comments Add your comment

Ne

October 20th, 2010
11:40 am

Hatred is learned at home.

Edward

October 20th, 2010
11:45 am

Children imitate their parents. Many, many adults behave like bullies now, it has become the norm. Your children see you doing it so they think it is not only acceptable but necessary.

Time to step up

October 20th, 2010
11:45 am

Call the assembly and ask everyone in the school who created the list. Following the silence, inform everyone that if someone doesn’t fess up then, if found later, they’ll be expelled. See if anyone answers. If they don’t, they can find out about the life lesson of repercussions/consequences for their actions.

Pandro

October 20th, 2010
11:49 am

If this isn’t nipped in the bud, imagine what monsters these kids will become by the time they reach college age.

EnoughAlready

October 20th, 2010
11:51 am

The web as a weapon; who would have thought. However, you are correct; a lot of parents don’t care as long as it’s not their child on the losing side. And the young ladies love to imitate those tv characters down to their exact words and body language.

My daughter started using a new word a few weeks ago and I still haven’t found out what it means or how to spell it. It’s not in the dictionary, I can tell you that.

Sam

October 20th, 2010
11:54 am

Capital punishment for bullies would solve the problem.

Woody Bass

October 20th, 2010
11:55 am

Time to step up: Unfortunately.. that would never work.

Edward/Ne: You have it mostly correct, but you also have the social stigma that is still directed at the homosexual community that is playing a large part of this coupled with the super neo-bible thumpers preaching about how sinful homosexuality is and how they should all go to hell.

The only way this is going to change.. is plain and simple.. education. There are plenty of misconceptions (granted there is some reality that feeds into those misconceptions) about the gay community. But people need to see it for themselves and not go by what they are being told by their parents or their preacher. I think they would find its not exactly what they think.

It is much better today than it ever has been… I graduated HS 20 something years ago… theres no way in hell I would ever have admitteded it.. even though most suspected I was gay. Kids are cruel and they fear what they do not understand.. and they take it out on what they fear.

V for Vendetta

October 20th, 2010
11:56 am

Hmmm, I still think this is much ado about nothing. The big difference here is that we put names on and sensationalize any and all aberrant behavior. This type of cruelty has been around for decades–even in young girls. It’s nothing knew. As I’ve said before, what really worries me is kids inability to deal with it–i.e., lack of self esteem.

Observer

October 20th, 2010
11:58 am

The article not withstanding I am pretty sure no crimes were committed. Only crime was one of decorum and decency.

V for Vendetta

October 20th, 2010
11:58 am

Woody Bass,

You’re absolutely right. As someone stated earlier, much of this is learned behavior . . . and not just from parents or TV. For every church pastor, minister, or priest who is preaching the evils of homosexuality and the eventual descent to hell for those who engage in them, there is a room ful of children listening, absorbing, and thinking. Hate is hate no matter how nicely you sweeten it.

a_mom

October 20th, 2010
11:59 am

EnoughAlready – try looking it up in urbandictionary.com. Just out of curiosity… what word is it?

AN

October 20th, 2010
12:02 pm

When I was 7, I watched the Smurfs. My niece is 7, and she idolizes Hannah Montana. I sat through one episode and was shocked. Definitely a show for pre-teens. Not something for my niece, who has been watching for two years. I tried very nicely to bring this up with her mother, my SIL, who told me “It’s on Disney Channel, so it’s fine.” That’s the problem with parents nowadays!

wussies united

October 20th, 2010
12:05 pm

Bullying is as old as time GET OVER IT! we are raising a generation of wussies that need every facet of there self esteem upheld every minute of every day. What are you going to do when they grow up and have a mean boss, or mean drill sergeant or mean neighbor??? Run over there and protect them PUKE! kids are kids some will be on the top of the pole and some will be on the bottom -that’s the way it is. All you jerk off parents and social morons that think every kid should be on the top of the pole –guess what the pole can’t support all those kids and it will snap and they’ll all be on the ground

Dr NO

October 20th, 2010
12:06 pm

Much-a-do about nothing. Let the kids have their fun.

ATF

October 20th, 2010
12:08 pm

What those young people did may be cruel, but it probably isn’t illegal. Can someone be kicked out of school for intentional cruelty? I would hope for at least a two-week suspension. Then, the kids should be put to work after school sweeping school floors, dusting school furniture, emptying trash cans, etc. – an hour a day for, say, four months.

And, the authors of the web site should be made to apologize to those they denigrated. It could be a quiet meeting in the school principal’s office with the students and parents attending. But, the parents need to be there.

Girl N

October 20th, 2010
12:09 pm

I saw a movie preview in D.C. this week for “Fair Game” and there’s a scene in which two people are yelling at one another to make a point, and the one character says if “I yell louder, does it make me right.” Well, just because bullying and taunting has been around for decades, that doesn’t make it right. Our world is mean because we allow or want it to be mean, and adults enable the meanness in children. Children should not have to go to school to be subjected to bullying and it has nothing to do with self esteem but everything to do with the bully’s lack of self control and respect for self. The bully is actually the one with the self esteem problem and using his/her influence to create havoc to feel better about their life. So unfortunate and sad. Someone tried to bully me in middle school and I fought back. She never tried it again and we actually became good acquaintances throughout high school. But I had to fight back and that had nothing to do with self esteem but self preservation.

Maureen Downey

October 20th, 2010
12:10 pm

@An, I would be curious what parents of middle school students think about “Glee.” I have now watched several episodes, and, while I think the show is clever, it seems far too sexual for the middle school following it has developed in my town.
Does anyone allow their middle schooler to watch the show?
Maureen

Runs With Scissors

October 20th, 2010
12:15 pm

I agree with the first post. How many times do you think these parents uttered a negative and or hateful remark and not consider the consequences.

Ashley Cudsik

October 20th, 2010
12:16 pm

You may find this of interest, in light of your SELP Project and stand in life. It’s happening your own backyard.

Hey Teacher

October 20th, 2010
12:21 pm

I love GLEE but I don’t think it should be on at 8:00. When I was in middle school, the TV show James at 15 (anyone remember that show? ) was off-limits because of mature subject matter, but it was on at 10:00 PM. Most middle-school kids are still up at 8:00.

[...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Fishing Tweeter and Marilyn Morehouse, Maureen Downey. Maureen Downey said: Peachtree City middle school meanness: Symptom of a culture gone bad or parents gone fishing? http://bit.ly/cHsq8t [...]

ATLMom

October 20th, 2010
12:30 pm

As a girl I was bullied and it has stayed with me forever. I’m now the mother of a 12-year-old girl and I witness bullying every day. I am probably overly sensitive to bullying because I’ve seen first hand the harm it can do. I”m the parent who notifies the school when a child (not always my own) tells me about bullying and intimidating behavior. I’m shocked with the number parents who feel that bullying much worse than this is just no big deal as long as their kid isn’t being targeted. I’m even more shocked when I learn that a school doesn’t inform the parents when such behavior is taking place. Kids need to be talked with about bullying at school & home. While this school doesn’t like being associated with this sort of thing, I applaude them for confronting this situation head on.

ml

October 20th, 2010
12:32 pm

as i’ve said before, one main reason a lot of people are having kids today is to prop up their status, ‘i’m a parent’, ‘i’m a mom’ like they won the nobel prize or something.
we put kids first and our elderly last, wrong wrong wrong
in our media, tv and movies, men are all idiots and bad. moms are now greater than Jesus. and for what? they got pregnant and had a child. now they take care of their own child. what’s so great about that? it seems like that is what you are supposed to do. and taking care of your own child is something you do for you. kids are portrayed as smarter than their parents. and everywhere you look is some woman hitting a man(promoting violence against the opposite sex, the last thing women should be doing) and acting like that is cool, independent, strong…it’s not, it’s just mean.
you can’t be a good woman if you are always trying to prove how bad a man you are.
men have made the most improvements over the last 40 years and get so little credit for what they have done, to the point a lot of men are giving up at trying. the next group to legitimately organize to fight for their rights in the future will be men.
and why shouldn’t they, the most manly thing the NFL actively and aggresively supports the fight against breast cancer. name a female organization that fights prostate cancer. and men getting raped in prison is treated like it’s a joke or deserved. it can’t be justified, an eye for an is wrong. as Gandhi said ‘an eye for an eye just makes the world blind’
women need to stop building themselves up by tearing men down.
and need to stop finding entertainment from watching people like kyra sedgewick, holly hunter, cameron diaz, kate hudson, sandra bullock,etc., belittle and violent attack anyone, even if that person happens to be a so-called ‘worthless, stupid, possessed by the devil’ man.

Forsyth County mom

October 20th, 2010
12:32 pm

RE: V for Vendetta, 11:56

“As I’ve said before, what really worries me is kids inability to deal with it–i.e., lack of self esteem.”

And how does their self-esteem go down so low? By being constantly BULLIED AT SCHOOL!!!!! Have you not been paying attention to the seemingly constant national stories recently about kids committing suicide because they’d been bullied to that point? And no one in authority at school had done anything about it. The kids cry out for help, and in some instances their parents go to the school asking for help to stop the bullying, and time after time they are told things like “If we don’t see/hear it, we can’t deal with it”, or “I’ll have a little talk with Johnny (or Suzy), or my personal favorite, “Kids will be Kids”. With the attitude you are showing you are part of the problem. Just because “This type of cruelty has been around for decades–even in young girls. It’s nothing knew” doesn’t make it ok. It means that we still haven’t done enough to protect those who are being bullied to death.

An advocate for public education change & choice

October 20th, 2010
12:34 pm

@ V for Vendetta – Excellant point about coping skills. I just recently learned from my wife about how upset my son got about being called “Tuxedo Boy” by another 9 year old. I was struck by how upset the young man was over the reference though he had NO IDEA what the heck it was supposed to be referring to. I believe many I have so coddled their kids to the point where their emotional toughness is nil. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t support the idea that any child should be called out of their name or harressed by another child, but on some level our kids have to be taught/developed in such a way that the shake off these insults. Certainly harsh words have been batted about between kids for decades. Now they the opportunity to be more widely broadcast and seem to have deadlier consequences as a result. In closing, I’ll say I would be tread carefully over the extent to which we should expect the public education system police the “free speech” rights of even kids when they engage in discourse within the public domain, outside of school and using personal resources that the school has no dominion over. Furthermore, we must guard more carefully the extent to which zero tolerance policies in schools are feeding kids into prison pipeline at earlier and earlier ages.

@ Girl N: I agree bullying has been around for ages and I agree that fact doesnt’ justify its existance. However, as I’ve stated above we are headed toward as slippery slope to head down the path of agreesive, no-tolerance like punative approaches to dealing with this age old concern.

Fatties United (FU)

October 20th, 2010
12:35 pm

Whatever happened to “sticks and stones”? Why are we raising these whiners? Teach your child he/she is the only person in control of their feelings. Teach them early in life not to care what other people think. Do not empower others to determine your happiness. Toughen up! It’s is and has always been a harsh world!

Rob

October 20th, 2010
12:36 pm

This is the same as “Slam Books” we had in the mid 80’s and my parents had in the 60’s and 70’s. We have just become to politically correct and everyone has to “feel good”. It is that same environment that the story yesterday about the teachers allowing students who fail tests to retake and retake until they pass. It is not about growing up in the real world, it is about making everyone “feel good” and be accepted. Before long, I will not be surprized to see school systems cutting out Homecoming queens and proms, because someone may not get invited to go and will feel ‘different’ than the other kids. It may sound heartless, but when these kids get out in the real world or college, they will not have local school systems there to protect them from getting picked on or from failing a test. They will be unprepared for the future and end up not being able to handle real life situations and be one of the nutjobs who end up killing themsleves or someone else because of the pressure.

Forsyth County mom

October 20th, 2010
12:37 pm

Oh yeah, and let’s all blame the victim.

Kat

October 20th, 2010
12:40 pm

lightning speed

World of Hate

October 20th, 2010
12:41 pm

It’s not that we’re raising wussies,it’s that kids are relentless these days. A friend of mine’s sister, was teased at school in a very harsh way. Her mother had just recently passed away, another student at the school said something to the affect of “we’re having a cook-out, you should invite your mom – oh wait! You can’t, because she’s dead!”. This little girl was only in middle school when this happened. Now, back in the old days, we’d punch the kid in the nose and call it a day, but we can’t do that. Kids are more fearful of getting in trouble or expelled for violence when sticking up for themselves, that they don’t know what else to do. Yet, we aren’t fixing the real issues, the BULLY! The child who would throw the first punch would get in the most trouble, usually that is the child who is defending themselves from something said or done to them first. The other child, who got hit, would get a slap on the wrist, or a “talkin’ to” and that’s it. So, we’ve taught our kids NOT to fight, but haven’t given them any other avenue to fight back, except words. And words can be more harmful than fists. We need to fix the ROOT of the issue…Maybe parents need to sit down with their kids more an explain right from wrong, watch their tv programs, monitor their computer usage….it’s just a thought…

V for Vendetta

October 20th, 2010
12:46 pm

Forsyth County mom,

Take your meds. I don’t condone bullying, and I would be the first to straighten my kids out if I caught them doing such a thing. It is thuggish and pathetic. However, that having been said, it IS part of growing up. Kids are far more cruel than adults can ever pretend to be. Part of it is because they don’t know better; they’re testing their boundaries and figuring out what’s acceptable. Part of it is learned behavior: they see such actions from their parents or on TV and try to recreate it with friends and other kids.

Stopping bullying after it has already started is a waste of time. At that point, it is too late. The best thing to do is teach kids how to be thoughtful and respectful when they’re young–and how to handle themselves if someone doesn’t afford them the same respect. They should have a high enough sense of self worth that they understand someone else’s words mean very little. They should have the self esteem to stand up for themselves and be their own advocates. They should have the moxy to close their fists if needs be and fight back. (And enough about kids with guns. If you live in an areas where every kid is armed, you’ve got bigger problems.)

Sorry, Forsyth County mom, but it sounds like YOU’RE part of the problem. Not me.

V for Vendetta

October 20th, 2010
12:49 pm

World of Hate,

“kids are relentless these days.”

These days? They’ve ALWAYS been relentless. Nothing has changed. We’re just not teaching them to deal with it. And, in point of fact, if either of my children retaliated physically against a bully who had first gone after them, I frankly wouldn’t care what stupid punishment the school gave them. Why can’t we teach kids to

1. respect themselves
2. walk away
3. verbally confront
4. if needs be, fight back

Seems like a pretty easy progression to teach to a child.

joe

October 20th, 2010
12:53 pm

Back in the day, us kids were terrified when we got caught acting up because we knew our Daddy would deliver a butt whoopin like none ever seen. Nowadays, parents don’t tan their kids hides at all and they get away with things like this scott free. So, I blame the parental units for failing to discipline their kids. Thats what happens when you “make everyone winners” and “play without keeping score” so you don’t hurt little Johnnie’s or Jane’s feelings. Time outs make for sissies. Next time, make the kid go outside and pick a switch.

bhamfornow

October 20th, 2010
12:53 pm

Welcome to PTC. Home of Conservative Christian Republicians (Teabaggers). Accountability has long left this town. “My kid can do no wrong”. If the parents only knew what was going on at the high schools, they wouldn’t believe it.

Candy

October 20th, 2010
12:54 pm

My daughter goes to high school in Marietta and several kids have created Facebook pages called “Marietta Burn Page”, just like in the movie “Mean Girls” where they made a “burn book” about everyone in the school. On the facebook page they posted pictures, had stamped derogitory words printed over the pictures, gave out phone numbers where you could find the person, etc. The pages were made by kids posing as another kid. Several of the kids were beat up pretty severely by students who really thought that they were the creator of the page and in fact, they were not. This stuff is getting really out of hand. But how do we reign in on the proper way to handle this?

George Johnson

October 20th, 2010
12:55 pm

God!! You people make me sick!!

This is a FREE SPEECH issue. Let the peer pressure work it out. You can’t just go in there and shut this sort of thing down, you people are willingly tossing your (scarce) freedoms right out the window.

You should publicize it, and let the peer pressure work. You people that willingly toss your freedoms away, freedoms that people fought for and lost their LIVES over, make me want to PUKE!! I’m ashamed you even call yourselves Americans.

There are FAR better ways of working with something like this than just going in there and telling these fools they have to shut something down, because somebody is offendddddeeddd…… (freaking cyrbabies….)

I wish you idiots would grow up for a change. You’re pathetic.

Forsyth County mom

October 20th, 2010
12:56 pm

I actually had a discussion about bullying over the weekend with my 20 year old daughter, who was home from college for a family emergency. She has a 10 year old sister, who was bullied on the bus last year. I asked her if bullying was worse now for elementary/middle school kids than when she was that age. She said that it is so much worse for those kids now because it can all be done anonymously, by text, facebook, myspace, etc. And that the bullying is even more cruel and hateful, just because it can be anonymous. These bullies have unlimited access to the internet, their own phones, and no one checking up on them. Their parents LIE FOR THEM to get them on facebook (you must be 13 to have a facebook page), never get their passwords, never do any checking up on what sites they’re going to, who they’re chatting with, etc., and they see this as a license to do anything they want. They have no parental supervision so they get away with anything. It’s time for us all to stand up against this kind of bullying in school and hold those kids responsible for what they say/do/post.
BTW, did you know that today, Oct. 20 is “Wear Purple to support anti-bullying” and to “support those kids & teens who are thinking about (or have committed) suicide because they can’t take any more” day? Are you wearing purple????

JATL

October 20th, 2010
12:56 pm

@V for Vendetta and all the rest who see this as no big deal -the differences today from when we were kids are a) the school administrations take a “head in the sand” approach because they’re SO afraid of being sued -by the bully’s parents; b) the bullies know they can get away with quite a bit that they would have been expelled or sent to alternative school for back in our day (or just plain had their a**es kicked -but the victims get expelled if they do that now); c) -the biggie -with Facebook, Twitter, MySpace and the internet in general, there aren’t just one or two bullies or mean girls in school these days. Every gutless little puke who has no self-esteem himself/herself so they must pick on others is texting and posting away. They get to hide behind a keyboard so it doesn’t matter how big or popular or good-looking they are. Often, they can get the egotistical “popular” crowd to befriend them simply by putting something awful together about another student or students. and of course -last but not least d) Lack of parenting -so many parents today are teaching their kids NOTHING about manners, empathy, social skills, etc. They expect the schools and television to do it all for them. The parents are so self-absorbed that they had kids as an accessory and spend no time with them instilling any character whatsoever. They’re the first ones to jump up and say their kids would NEVER do some of these things and they’ll sue the school system if their child is targeted as a bully! Since they never pay any attention to their kid, they actually have no clue what he or she might do.

Kat

October 20th, 2010
12:57 pm

A very interesting discussion taking place here today. My thoughts are that just because it’s been around forever does not make it inevitable. Some diseases are inevitable, but we still fight them – right? It also sounds like “wussies united” probably has a kid who is a bully judging by his comments telling others to toughen up. I’m all for kids letting comments roll off their backs and ignore them – sometimes that does work. Other times, you have to stand up to the bully. But, there are bullies everywhere – including the AJC Blogs where (when hidden behind an IP address), people will say things that they would not dare say in public as it would be rude and childish. As for any type of punishment for the children who did this, I don’t think there is anything legally wrong with it, but perhaps morally there is. Parents should know what their kids are up to. And, if a student turns the originators in, they may become bullied themselves. It’s a vicious cycle!

yolanda

October 20th, 2010
12:57 pm

Get real folks. I am nearly 50 years old and, yes, from early childhood on up have been the subject of and, yes, perpetrator, of “bullying” (seems to me it was referred to as teasing when I was young). Regardless of what you call it, some kids will be picked on (most actually) and some kids will be “popular.” If you teach your child to be a “victim” as opposed to teaching them that life is not always roses and some folks are cretins to be ignored, they will be so throughout their life. We’re not automatons, life is not perfect, and, with a few glaring exceptions out there, folks need to get over it.

Rod

October 20th, 2010
1:00 pm

“Stopping bullying after it has already started is a waste of time” – what? That is the dumbest statement I’ve read in a long time.

No, V – YOU’RE the problem.

So, if your kid is getting bullied – you’re not going to try and stop it? If your kid is constantly ridiculed and BEATEN UP, you’re not going to stop it? Either you’re a liar or a pathetic parent.

southern hope

October 20th, 2010
1:00 pm

V for Vendetta , I don’t mean to be argumentative….but I”m very happy that my kids don’t go to school with your kids.

Kat

October 20th, 2010
1:01 pm

Not sure any of our soldiers’ first thoughts when fighting for our freedom are thinking about a bully’s right to trash talk about fellow students, but perhaps they do?

SpaceyG

October 20th, 2010
1:02 pm

So… Hannah Montana is threatening to the geek moms. *yawn*

Fatties United (FU)

October 20th, 2010
1:04 pm

We all knew how to stop bullies when we were little. My son went through the same thing in day care. We went to the owner. It did not stop. As usuall, the bully was much bigger and was picking on 5-7 younger boys. One on one, my son and his friends were no match. I told him to get all the younger boys to agree the next time one of them was bullied, they were all to jump on the bully and beat the hell out of him with whatever they could. When finished, they were to tell him if he ever bullied anyone else, all of the boys would do it again. He was never a problem after that. The owner did not like what I told my son to do but I reminded her I went to her first and she could not stop the bullying. My way did. To this day, that bully, now a fine young man, still apologizes to my son when he sees him. Bullies do not like a hard target, they want an easy target. Teach your kids not to be easy prey! School officials wont like it but are they protecting your kids now?

David Sims

October 20th, 2010
1:06 pm

Ha! Note the language skills of the person who wrote: “Peachtree City Police are investigating to determine who created the web site, and if any crimes were broken.”

I thought that crimes are ~committed~ when LAWS are broken, such as, apparently, the laws that prohibit people from expressing opinions about homosexuality contrary to those held by homosexuals.

Or laws that prohibit people from expressing opinions about race contrary to those held by liberals.

Or laws that prohibit people from expressing opinions about the behavior of the NSDAP’s Schutzstaffel during the Second World War which are contrary to those held by Jews.

Or laws that prohibit people from expressing opinions about gender roles contrary to those held by feminists.

Or laws that used to prohibit Russians from expressing opinions about Marxism contrary to those held by the Communist Party of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics.

Anybody who disagrees with them, and gets caught doing it, will get an organized, public ostracism and the pedantic scrutiny of various civil authorities, who will end up doing to the dissidents as much actual harm as they are legally allowed to do. Which, except for that last category, isn’t much, since it remains legal to look askance at homosexuality, at the idea of racial equality, at exaggerated Holocaust claims, or at women being made firefighters even though they can’t carry a heavy man down a ladder or even get over that darn barricade wall.

So far, that is. If these various leftists have their way, though, it soon will be illegal to dispute with them about what is right and what is wrong—every social discussion will become as dangerous to dissenters as it was to Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn.

allyanaz

October 20th, 2010
1:07 pm

Ne, you are correct. This behavior is learned AT HOME and the parents are solely to blame. Whether it is a lack of time spent with the child, or instilling in them to achieve. People are putting a lot of blame on the internet, but note it is the children of a certain generation…the “me” generation that do these things.

Kat

October 20th, 2010
1:09 pm

I don’t think I quite understand how “yolanda” seems proud of her (hopefully, former) bullying status. A lot of bullying can be avoided by kids simply understanding manners and appropriate social skills, which the parents are responsible for teaching their children. From the comments, I suspect that some people on this blog who were bullies have never gotten out of that role. Some people actually grew up and understand that appropriate behavior takes you farther in today’s world than being a teaser, bully, or whatever you want to call it.

SET

October 20th, 2010
1:10 pm

The students involved should be transferred to another school. Publicly.

Until then a good dose of shunning them and their families is called for.

SpaceyG

October 20th, 2010
1:10 pm

I knew this anti-bullying thing would get to absurd levels of PC and societal nonsense. And this is raising the red flag! Anti-bullying initiatives and eduction and information are great. When we start blaming a silly, non-violent, funcapes, dopey, FICTIONAL teen TV character for societal woes then we’re veering WAY into ruining-the-message territory. Not to mention just-please-shut-the-f-up territory.