When UGA student can’t park his scooter, he rides parking services and ends up with disciplinary charges

parkingShould a student be punished for mouthing off?  The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education doesn’t think so, and is claiming another victory  involving a public Georgia university and student speech. (A few weeks ago, I posted an entry about the Valdosta State student who also won his case with the help of the group, which advocates for individual rights, due process, freedom of expression, academic freedom, and rights of conscience on colleges and universities.)

University of Georgia student Jacob Lovell used a bit of strong language to complain in an e-mail about the lack of scooter parking on the Athens campus. (Apparently, he doesn’t subscribe to the old adage about getting better results with honey than the F-bomb.)

The peeved parking services folks forwarded his e-mail to the Student Judiciary, which proceeded to tell Lovell that he was being charged with two violations of UGA’s University Conduct Regulations, stating, “Specifically, it is alleged that Mr. Lovell engaged in disorderly conduct and disrupted parking services when he sent an email to them that was threatening.” Lovell was required to make a disciplinary appointment by Sept. 13 or he would be flagged from registering.

Here is the e-mail with the bad language removed:

Subject: Scooter parking
Message: To: parking@uga.edu

Why isn’t there any scooter parking near Aderhold, according to your parking map? There’s like a billion places to park on north campus and over by the Georgia center, but nothing anywhere close to Aderhold. What the hell? Did you guys just throw darts at a map to decide where to put scooter corrals? Can I expect you guys to get off your a**** and put in a corral near there some point before I f****** graduate and/or the sun runs out of hydrogen?

Thanks for nothing, ever,

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: UGA Parking Services
Date: Wed, Aug 18, 2010 at 3:40 PM
Subject: Re: Your Parking Services Request – Case 000000000016711

Your e-mail was sent to student judiciary.


Request: Scooter parking

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Jacob Lovell
Date: Wed, Aug 18, 2010 at 8:34 PM
Subject: Re: Your Parking Services Request – Case 000000000016711
To: UGA Parking Services

So that’s a no?

In coming to Lovell’s defense, FIRE wrote to UGA President Michael F. Adams and the student learned last week that the matter was closed.

“If a student can’t complain about scooter parking, how can students be expected to feel comfortable taking on anything genuinely controversial?” said FIRE Vice President of Programs Adam Kissel. “Yet, on campus after campus we have seen that schools have forgotten that truly fostering a ‘marketplace of ideas’ necessarily means sometimes hearing things you do not want to hear.”

This is off topic a bit, but I spent a night in a first floor Ivy League dorm last weekend – in a room set aside for visitors –  and heard students coming in late at night. I was struck by their deep attachment to the f-word, which has become their adjective of choice as well as their standard rejoinder to statements to which their elders might say “wow” or “no kidding.”

I am a different generation and still find the word off-putting, but there is a greater concern: If these teens use this word so often, aren’t they worried about it slipping out in a workplace internship or while chatting with a supervisor?

Can it become a bad habit they can’t shake?

Or is it acceptable now in daily discourse and complaining e-mails?

119 comments Add your comment

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money

September 23rd, 2010
5:45 am

No, it is not acceptable. The school must simply prohibit the use of profanity in its By-laws/student rules much like the Code of Conduct that high school students must follow that can be found in most HS agendas.

WE lost our way

September 23rd, 2010
6:06 am

Maureen, I agree with you 100%. My son goes to UGA and being there for one day to visit makes you wonder what language they are teaching. I know it has transferred to the the business world and may become the norm. My wife still works and she tells me about the use of profanity by employees and supervisors on a daily basis. It is the new way to express yourself all the time.

God Bless the Teacher!

September 23rd, 2010
6:17 am

Don’t start blaiming schools about the filthy language coming out of students’ mouths. It’s the culture to which students have been exposed growing up. Peer groups determine acceptable behavior, whether in the school yard or work place. As long as “free speech” means media outlets (i.e., music, movies, etc.) are able to use just about any language they want, then don’t expect students or adults to never use filthy language. Shouldn’t the bigger issue being discussed here be why UGA has not thought out how to better accommodate those students who are actively trying to help the parking situation by driving to school a more reasonable mode of transportation? If not, then let’s count the number of responses it takes before complete blame is placed on schools (i.e, students’ teachers) for the student’s e-mail rant.

teacher&mom

September 23rd, 2010
6:42 am

I wish I could say I was shocked by the young man’s email. I’m not and I bet he just received instant “hero” status on campus for his foul mouth. While the young man had a valid point about the lack of parking, his choice of words negated his entire purpose. UGA should have held firm on the disciplinary action.

WE lost our way

September 23rd, 2010
7:06 am

Just for your information,UGA has a bus transit system throughout campus and has outside service with Athens Transit System at no cost to the student. You can live off campus and still get anywhere on campus with the bus system. Yes, you may have to walk from one building to another for a class but it want kill you. Also they schedule classes 15 min. apart so you can walk to the next class or jog(good exercise). Class scheduling ahead for the next semester will solve a majority of these type problem.

catlady

September 23rd, 2010
7:06 am

It probably would have been better, rather than giving this foul mouthed blowhard the glory, to just have replied, “Thank you for your suggestion. We are looking into your complaint.”

As a professional, i don’t have to listen to people cuss and threaten as part of my job. I am simply not paid, nor dispositionally inclined, to do so. I will leave the room or call the police.

While many people use the F word...

September 23rd, 2010
7:16 am

..as a common adjective these days, I have found that it is more of a “northern” thing – your experience in an Ivy League atmosphere probably made it more pronounced. As such, I am reminded of the movie ‘My Cousin Vinny’ – it was hilarious, and I thought that it would be great for my mother in law to watch – however, upon watching it with her I obviously had forgotten how much the F word was used in that movie. Needless to say I was mortified, though the MIL did not say anything and did enjoy it.

When telling my wife of my concern and embarrassment for suggesting such a foul mouthed movie, she reminded me that that is just how people in NJ and the north regularly speak, and it is true – though with many having now gravitated to the south, it is much more prevalent down here, too. And, yes, I am old (over 55) and true to my southern roots…

Dr NO!!

September 23rd, 2010
7:41 am

The use of scooters should be immediately discontinued and this young man expelled.

Philosopher

September 23rd, 2010
7:52 am

The email is appalling! Period. No excuses. Period. Where in the world did that brat learn to speak (write) to anyone that way?! He clearly has little respect for anyone. My oldest kids are college kids and would speak to NO one in such a manner…for any reason. HOWEVER…my son would have approached the parking services, asked to speak with a person in authority and when he finished discussing the issue with them, his scooter would have been moved and parked for him and he would be fast friends with all of them. When we have no respect for others, we clearly have little for ourselves, either, and it shows in every aspect of American life right now. We had better wake up, folks. Children need to treat others respectfully, understand that we can’t always have our own way…and how speak and write well- all elements that are missing in this email. Lastly, in our house, the old adage “cussing is the crutch of the crippled conversationalist” is also respected.There are so may better words to use and they are impressive. You CAN raise kids that don’t use profanity.

teacher&mom

September 23rd, 2010
7:58 am

Of course Mr. Lovell’s infamous email can be found through a simple Google search of his name. Future employers may not be as impressed with Mr. Lovell’s choice of words. You know what they say about karma ;)

Teacher

September 23rd, 2010
7:59 am

If you would like to see where kids learn to deal with problems in this manner, come take a look at the nonsensical emails that are sent to teachers by parents to defend their lying children. Usually these emails are sent after 10pm, presumably after a bottle of wine.

Mike

September 23rd, 2010
8:04 am

His language has become more and more mainstream. Read any article in Rolling Stone or Men’s Journal.

Athenian

September 23rd, 2010
8:04 am

I have heard plenty of people drop the F-bomb with a perfect southern accent on the UGA campus… I don’t believe it is just a NJ or northern thing. I recommend a persuasive writing class for the student, and a refresher on the constitution for the people in Parking Services.

Elizabeth

September 23rd, 2010
8:08 am

UGA should have stood firm and disciplined that yong man. This languafe is on TV, in every movie, in most books including juvenile literature and rampant in our schools. It is what students hear at home and everywhere else they go. I have sat through more than one parent conference in which the parent has a foul mouth and continually uses these words. I am am required to listen and say nothing because it is an adult, the parent, talking. Yet we discipline kids for that.

I inform my students every year that words like “bull, crap, sucks, hell, damn,” and expressions like “that’s gay” are NOT allowed in my classroom. Both parents and students are amazed to discover that I consider such words inappropriate for use in everyday life.

Our language is disintegrating because a correct and varied vocabulary is no longer valued. It is one thing to place a few bits of profanity in a novel IN CONTEXT ( such as in a novel like To KIIll A Mockingbird or The Grapes of Wrath) and another to lace a book with multiple profanities because that is the fashion of the day. I have been unable to read the Run with the Horsemen series by Ferrol Sams because of this. The story is wonderful but the language made me unable to continue because most of it was not needed to tell the story.That being said..

Please don’t write mkultiple blog entries condemning my lack of “sensitivity” or old fashioned values. I stand by my assessment, and if you read the words IN CONTEXT in this response, you will under stand that I am NOT comdemning all such language in literature.

Atlanta mom

September 23rd, 2010
8:09 am

There are two issues here.
First is the f bomb. This is not a northern thing, believe me. While the word has never been used in my home, I hear my children use it with regularity when talking with their friends. I used to find it appalling, now it is merely disconcerting.
The second is how one makes an inquiry and requests a change. This young man fails. But, I’m guessing he did learn this delightful behavior at home.

Drew

September 23rd, 2010
8:25 am

I curse like a sailor in my daily life (I’m 25), but it’s never once slipped out in the three years I’ve been teaching a class of kids. It’s a different mindset when I’m just hanging out with my friends. The above e-mail is obviously stupid and he obviously is not going to get what he wants, but he shouldn’t be punished.

stw

September 23rd, 2010
8:35 am

The kid’s got a lot of class…too bad it’s all low..

Dr NO!!

September 23rd, 2010
8:40 am

The use of scooters should be discontinued and this young man expelled immediately.

Lynx

September 23rd, 2010
8:40 am

Your statement that you are of another generation tells the story. Most adults older than say, 35, still regard the f-word as jarring and vulgar. Not so for younger adults. As you note, it has become a part of regular speech, used casually as well as an expletive when angry. The English language and usage are very fluid – grammar and punctuation are not the only things that change.

Here’s what Wickipedia says about profanity…http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Profanity…that swear words are stress relievers and “…that university provosts swear more than librarians or the staff members of the university day care center.”

In the South, I hear parents insist on their children using “ma’am” and “sir” to adults, which to the parents conveys politeness. The irony of this forced politeness was apparent to me when I heard an in-laws child (11 years old at the time) turn to his mother in a fit of anger and say, “F— you, ma’am!” I promise I didn’t laugh (out loud).

Shan

September 23rd, 2010
8:41 am

The bottom line is that this young man is adult, and although he could have opted to use less coarse language, that doesn’t make his argument any less valid. Also, universities need to realize that they cannot simply arbitrarily charge students with violating campus codes when they have actually not done so. Let this be a lesson to Valdosta, UGA and the like!

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Philosopher

September 23rd, 2010
8:50 am

Dear Drew: At what point, if any, would you consider firing foul language and foul rhetoric at a person to be abusive? If your mother was one of the parking department employess, would you think it OK for this person to speak, email in such a manner to her? If we have no expectations for decent behavior one to another, we have anarchy. If we do have lines we draw beyond which is indecent treatment of another and someone crosses that line, he/she should be held responsible…can’t have it both ways.

Shar

September 23rd, 2010
8:57 am

Using the f word as adjective, adverb, exclamation, noun, verb and subject noun is, sadly, universal. And, as I told my kids, it’s boring. My son went to Grady, and it was common to hear the word used four or five times in a sentence during casual conversation. In a way, this was a convincing reinforcement to my argument that good conversationalists don’t rely on any one word, or a word “tic” such as “like”, to make their speech or writing interesting and persuasive. I also taught them that word choice should reflect the person with whom they are speaking. They may, and do, use the f bomb when speaking with friends, but they don’t when they talk to me, to their employers or their grandmothers.

My daughter is a freshman at UGA, and during orientation we were told repeatedly that scooters had to be registered on campus and that there was limited parking for them. The entitled Mr. Lovell has bigger problems than his banal and incorrect writing, into which he incorporated the weak and pointless “like (a billion places…)”, the use of the f-bomb (obviously a verb) as an adjective, and suggested that he is unlikely to graduate until “the sun runs out of hydrogen” (which, given this sample of his verbal skills, may be the truest point he makes). He obviously cannot hear the clear instructions, both written and verbal, that we all received from Parking Enforcement; he is unable to act in accordance with rules, and he is so utterly convinced of his right to special treatment that he freely abuses and ridicules those whose responsibility it is to find ways to share scarce resources.

He also cannot read a map. Aderhold has a large parking lot directly to one side, and it has a big bus stop directly in front. It is also across the street and down one block from additional lots near the Coverdell Center. Apparently, however, these options are not good enough for Mr. Lovell, who seems to have a pressing need to park mere feet from his destination.

His limited skills in vocabulary and writing, his imperious sense of entitlement, his reliance on abuse and petulant demands to get his own way and his refusal to accomodate the needs of others are far more damning to his future than a pitiful, adolescent use of “bad words” to buttress his claim to adulthood. With this letter permanently in cyberspace for any potential employer or graduate school to see, his chances of enhancing his future prospects are significantly poorer than those of his fellow students, particularly in a tight job market.

Mr. Lovell may feel smug at having the University back down, but that is a rather predictable reaction from the foolish, short-sighted and smug.

lyncoln

September 23rd, 2010
8:59 am

Well, it certainly isn’t the the most eloquent way of expressing his displeasure. I agree that his message isn’t actually going to change anything. Better to just respond with “Your comments have been taken into consideration. Thank you” and move on with life.

I found the Student Judiciary’s statement to be just as foolish. Where in the e-mail did he threaten the parking services people? Also, I can’t imagine a single e-mail was actually capable of disrupting the operations of the parking system of UGA. Perhaps they were all standing around the office arguing how to respond to the e-mail and thus did nothing else during the day?

As for the use of profanity, all I can do is point to a statement that has long been part of culture “Sh$% Happens”. Bumper stickers like that suggest that cursing is becoming more culturally accepted.

Kristal

September 23rd, 2010
8:59 am

If this is the same Jacob Lovell who previously attended the University of West Georgia, then I’m not surprised he would casually drop the f-bomb. To put it midly, he can be a bit crass when it comes to expressing his opinions.

Dr. T

September 23rd, 2010
9:02 am

Filth is filth, and shoudk be treated as such.

F***ing Right

September 23rd, 2010
9:13 am

The student of course had the right to complain. The decision to close the case as it was framed was correct.
However, the student should not have the right to be disrespectful to employees and other students on campus.
A warning should have been issued to curb the language when communicating with employees. Everyone on campus should have to act respectfully to everyone else, teachers, students, etc. (probably is in the student handbook).

This whole situation stems from the current problem of teachers giving grades so marginal students can attend GA public schools under HOPE.

Roy Barnes Lipstick

September 23rd, 2010
9:25 am

The use of scooters should be discontinued and this young man expelled immediately…yes immediately.

JATL

September 23rd, 2010
9:31 am

Who CARES about college kids using the F word? Geeez -UGA parking has been insane for years. I’m 40 and was there in the late 80s -it was HORRIFIC! Good for him. He certainly shouldn’t have been sent to student judiciary for telling them the truth. Sounds like whoever sent it is just a low level bureaucrat paper-pusher who will never be more.

teacher&mom

September 23rd, 2010
9:35 am

“This whole situation stems from the current problem of teachers giving grades so marginal students can attend GA public schools under HOPE.”

Bahahahahaha…..yeah right blame the teachers. How predictable….

drew (former teacher)

September 23rd, 2010
9:51 am

Profanity has been around a long time, and it’s not’s going anywhere. It’s just words, people…it ain’t like it’s sticks and stones. And to compare the profane words of one generation to those of another, is pointless. Ditto for the North/South comparison…I’ve seen southerners who can cuss circles around New Jersey!

There’s a time and place for everything. I’ve discovered that my own propensity to “cuss” has varied over the years (I’m 54), depending on my social environment. When I’ve worked with people who used lots of profanity, I’ve found myself doing the same, both in and out of the workplace. But during the time I was teaching I found myself using less profanity, mainly because the profession demanded it, and those I worked with used little profanity. Now that I’m back in the private sector, working mostly with men my age, who don’t shy from profanity, I’m right there with them (it’s like riding a bike). And you don’t want to hear what comes out of my mouth sometimes when I’m driving. If this makes me a bad, or disrespectful person, then so be it. I’m guilty as charged.

And while the “profane” email in question may not be respectful (or productive), I think the writer makes good use of profanity to clearly convey his level of frustration with parking services. When conveying thoughts and feelings, sometimes a profane word is the best word. Plus…sometimes it just feels good!

I don’t use the same language with with my kids, mother-in-law, pastor, or God forbid, a judge, that I use with my friends. Like I said, there’s a time and a place. Yes, it’s a habit, but one that most people can control.

Philosopher says:
“My oldest kids are college kids and would speak to NO one in such a manner…for any reason.”
Seriously? For real? Not even a sh_t or a dam_? I don’t think you know your kids as well as you think you do.

Maureen Downey

September 23rd, 2010
9:58 am

@Kristal, I thought his message and his short response were clever rather than crass with the exception of the expletives, which negated the message. His tone ensured that his concerns would not be taken seriously. Maureen

Tony

September 23rd, 2010
9:59 am

Right to freedom of expression comes with a responsibility to treat others respectfully. It is sad that a group is advocating for a person to have the right to berate others in such a demeaning way. Just because a person wants to shoot of at the mouth does not give them any special dispensation.

FIRE’s response about “hearing things you do not want to hear” is lame, especially in a case like this. Back in the 60s when protests against the Vietnam war were taking place, you definitely heard things you didn’t want to hear. There is a huge difference between this kind of expression and the kind of berating language Jacob chose to use.

Bottom line – Jacob needs to grow up.

LLL

September 23rd, 2010
9:59 am

What kind of a whimp are these parking office people to feel “threatened” by this e-mail? I think people in the law enforcement (not sure if parking office is exactly a law enforcement office) should learn to deal with unhappy customers the way service industry people have to deal with them. Sending an e-mail is not a criminal act, even if it contained some vulgar languages. The Judiciary office should have sent the e-mail back to the parking office and told them to “grow up” and “learn to deal with him.”

Tony

September 23rd, 2010
10:02 am

One more thing – the employees of UGA have a right to work in a place free from abusive situations, too. If the University fails to protect their rights, they can also sue. In this case, choosing to support the employees was the right call.

Sounder

September 23rd, 2010
10:39 am

He’s a dumb kid. He made a childish mistake. The use of profanity in his email makes him sound like an idiot, and ensures that his complaint will not be taken seriously. If he just wanted to vent, I guess he was successful. If he actually wanted to affect change, he failed.

I can tell you that if I was an employer considering hiring this guy, and someone brought that email to my attention, his resume would go straight in the trash. No one wants a person who is unable to communicate effectively working for them.

LLL

September 23rd, 2010
10:43 am

Tony,

Is an e-mail with some profanity an “abuse”? I think people in the offices like the Parking Enforcement should develop much thicker skin.

Mid GA Retiree

September 23rd, 2010
10:46 am

The student showed his maturity level with his vocabulary. His disrespect for the institution that he is paying to educate him is evident. I totally agree with Sounder. Any resume I got from him would go straight into the trash. I wish someone at UGA had the intestinal fortitude to tell this student “Perhaps we are not the college for you. We wish you well as you pursue your education elsewhere!”

AlreadySheared

September 23rd, 2010
10:47 am

From “Planes, Trains & Automobiles”

Car Rental Agent: [cheerfully] Welcome to Marathon, may I help you?
Neal: Yes.
Car Rental Agent: How may I help you?
Neal: You can start by wiping that f***ing dumb-ass smile off your rosey, f***ing, cheeks! And you can give me a f***ing automobile: a f***ing Datsun, a f***ing Toyota, a f***ing Mustang, a f***ing Buick! Four f***ing wheels and a seat!
Car Rental Agent: I really don’t care for the way you’re speaking to me.
Neal: And I really don’t care for the way your company left me in the middle of f***ing nowhere with f***ing keys to a f***ing car that isn’t f***ing there. And I really didn’t care to f***ing walk, down a f***ing highway, and across a f***ing runway to get back here to have you smile in my f***ing face. I want a f***ing car RIGHT F***ING NOW!
Car Rental Agent: May I see your rental agreement?
Neal: I threw it away.
Car Rental Agent: Oh boy.
Neal: Oh boy, what?
Car Rental Agent: You’re f***ed!

Drew

September 23rd, 2010
10:50 am

@Mid GA Retiree

Expel a kid for dropping the F-work?? Are you serious?? Drop the holier-than-thou attitude.

Drew

September 23rd, 2010
10:50 am

sorry, that should be “word,” not “work”

TheCapn

September 23rd, 2010
11:00 am

I have heard “abusive” talk without a so-called profane word ever entering into the speech. I have worked with people who simply considered ANY profanity to be “abusive”, so this doesn’t surprise me. It’s simply a bunch of power-hungry people who look for ways to gain the upper hand by claiming abuse and “disruption” simply to have someone they can’t or won’t deal with to be dealt with by someone else. It’s also the kind of people who think that every person who deals with them absolutely MUST conform to their own set of values. It makes them feel good to have that student brought up on some idiotic charges, because they need to be able to exert some false dominance over them, or prove that they have to respect whatever ridiculous rules they have for inter-personal communication. Kind of like the cops who think that their every command must be slavishly obeyed, and when someone dares question them, they get charged with “disorderly conduct” or “interference with an officer.” Again, it is petty little people with power issues, who think that fear of their position somehow makes that position better. I have a lot of respect for people just trying to do their jobs, police included, but these people, police included, need to understand that a badge or a title does not put them in any sort of position above anyone else. In fact, when I see these people trying desperately to exert this pretend dominance, they lose my respect altogether. As for the arguments about transit, then, you could argue that any and ALL parking spots should be promptly eliminated, since this transportation is so convenient, and so much better than the alternative. His argument is still valid: why have dozens of specialized spots at one place, and not another?

Dr. John Trotter

September 23rd, 2010
11:18 am

Maureen: I too find the F-bomb quite “off-putting” (as you put it). But, I have certainly had many police and government officials to attempt to abridge my non-F-bombing speech. I have been locked up on a few occasions for my “free speech.” I am quite amazed how that those in power (even little bits of “power” like student judiciaries) actually think that it is their right to police someone’s speech.

Georgia and other states refused to ratify our Constitution without the additional ten amendments (our “Bill of Rights”). The first is Freedom of Speech. When we start allowing the speech police to get their way, then we are in trouble. I have found that police officers seem to hate pickets. Heck, our country was founded in dissent and protest. This is pure Americana.

I take personally my ability to say what I want to say. I know the parameters about hollering “Fire!” in a crowded theatre. But, allowing little weasels to get by with abridging your speech just because they are uncomfortable with it is beyond the pail. I have been arrested, but I have never been convicted of one thing because charges are dropped. Prosecutors know that they don’t have a leg to stand on when a police officer makes a false arrest about speech that he or she just doesn’t like — or, more likely because the superintendent or some other booger-eater wants the police officers to shut me up. I am not easily shut up. I know when my speech is appropriate and permissible. I do not disrupt meetings, but when the meeting is over, I know that I can talk. And I know that I have a right to quietly hold up a sign in the back of the public meeting room, as long as it does keep others from seeing what is going on. I was arrested for this also. Charges were summarily dropped.

One time a police officer admitted to me that he knew that we (at MACE) had a right to picket but they he was just going to solve an “immediate problem” by arresting us. Can you imagine? Of course, he apparently changed his mind when we whipped out the video camera!

The Constitution protects uncomfortable, unpleasant, and unpopular (even if just unpopular with the government officials) speech. Pleasant, nice, and sweet speech needs no protecting.

Maureen Downey

September 23rd, 2010
11:38 am

To all, Someone posted a response to this blog under the name Jacob Lovell, but the posting did not pass muster with our filter because of a string of F-bombs. But I thought his point was worth sharing, so I am posting it here with my edits. Jacob, if that was you, the F word may not be a curse, as you note, but it still can’t survive the filters of most blogs. (I also think that you are probably going to provoke a lot of people into saying it’s you who ought to “grow up.” )
But to free speech and free debate, here is Jacob’s post:

Just a side note – a few weeks after I sent the email, but before the charges were dropped, a new paint job was given to the motorcycle parking areas right near where I wanted to park, and one of them is now exclusively for scooters. Just wanted to share that with everyone who keeps saying “more flies with honey.”

Also, f***ity, f***, f***, f***. It’s four letters, and magic doesn’t exist, so it’s not really a ‘curse’ or otherwise going to hurt you. Grow up :)

Stevie Bee Goode

September 23rd, 2010
11:51 am

By the way, how is The Georgia Gang going to operate these next few Sunday mornings…with one of their principals, Jeff Dickerson, apparently working overtime trying to shore up the “beat-up” images of the Atlanta Public Schools, the DeKalb School System, and Bishop Eddie Long? Will Dick Williams be his usual chipper self? My guess is that they will handle these matters delicately and gingerly, especially since colleague Jeff Dickerson makes his money (apparently a lot) helping these entities in their Public Relations. Perhaps the Clayton County School System should have hired ole Jeff, and Dick might have given Clayton a free pass. Dick lives in Dunwoody, right? No, he wouldn’t want his house values to plummet like in Clayton County. Yep, poor little ole Clayton County was beaten to a pulp by the media likes of Dick Williams and Jeff Dickerson. Now it seems that a more seedy situation is sitting in their back yards. Hmm…life is interesting.

AlreadySheared

September 23rd, 2010
11:58 am

Yep,
F***, f***, f***ing f***. And, while we’re at it, n****r, n*****r, n****r.

I’m guessing these are pretty much the same psychotic egotists who get fussy when, behind the wheel of a car, their ability to run 20+ mph over the speed limit is impaired. And who do their best to mow down pedestrians in crosswalks.

Mid GA Retiree

September 23rd, 2010
12:04 pm

I would absolutely expel this young man for his flagrant abuse of good manners. It is high time that people took a stand and try to bring civility back to our culture. Expelling students for crudeness and gross profanity is a start. And next, let’s do the same to politicians. If the truth be known, he just might have learned the word from a politician.

Maureen Downey

September 23rd, 2010
12:09 pm

@Mid Ga, If we expelled college students and legislators for a lack of manners or bad language, I suspect that we could turn UGA into a cow pasture and the Statehouse into a homeless shelter.
Maureen

LLL

September 23rd, 2010
12:15 pm

Do people ever watch Cops on TV? Don’t those police officers use the f-word pretty frequently? Why is it ok for them to use the word?