The race is on. But does everyone want to run with the Race to the Top money? And where are we going with it?

In discussing the $400 million Race to the Top grant that Georgia won this week, U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan said he was not concerned that the November election might usher in new state leadership ambivalent about the federal dollars and anxious about the federal oversight.

“This is bigger than any governor or any school chief,” he said. “Hundreds and hundreds of individuals put in a huge amount of hours and came up with a great plan. This isn’t about any one person.”

But is it about 10 or 20 people? Georgia is about to elect a new governor and new school superintendent who could be leery, if not hostile, to federal intrusion into Georgia schools. That new regime might well result in a whole new slate of leadership at the state Department of Education. So it could be that more than a few contributors to the state’s RTTT application are not in place come January.

GOP school chief candidate John Barge has already had an apparently mutually unsatisfying stint at DOE, and some agency officials say privately it is unlikely that he would keep them on staff or that they would stay.

While Barge says he will accept Race to the Top funds now that Georgia has won one of the coveted grants, he has also said, “In my view, the amount of money we could receive from Race to the Top does not justify yet more federal government intrusion and bureaucratic micromanagement of our local schools.”

And Republican gubernatorial candidate Nathan Deal has been so conflicted on whether he would even accept Race to the Top dollars that he prompted Sonny Perdue to give a little speech for his sake at the press conference where the governor announced the grant: “I want to say once again, for many who have feared that this is federal intrusion, the feds gave us no rules. They said, you put together a plan that you can implement.”

And that is why the governor’s policy director, Erin Hames, has moved to DOE, to convert the 200-page Race to the Top application into action. Two hours into her new DOE chief of staff job Thursday, the former-teacher-turned-attorney talked to me about why all of Georgia, not just the 26 partner school districts, should be thrilled with the grant.

These districts, which make up 41 percent of public school students in Georgia, are: Atlanta, Ben Hill, Bibb, Burke, Carrollton, Chatham, Cherokee, Clayton, Dade, DeKalb, Dougherty, Gainesville, Gwinnett, Hall, Henry, Jones, Meriwether, Muscogee, Peach, Pulaski, Rabun, Richmond, Rockdale, Spalding, Valdosta and White. By the numbers, the districts include 46 percent of Georgia’s students in poverty, 53 percent of Georgia’s African American students, 48 percent of Hispanics and 68 percent of the state’s lowest achieving schools.

These districts get half the $400 million to underwrite a series of innovations and pilots that are outlined in the application, Hames said, but that still leaves $200 million for the refinement of a student information system, the creation of teacher evaluation tools that use student growth as their basis and improved professional development for all educators.

Hames hopes that the new leadership will keep her on the DOE staff, noting that she came to the post with the full support of the State Board of Education. “There are 37 governor’s races right now, so 37 states are going through the same thing,” she said.

“This was developed with a large group of stakeholders and a strong commitment of local Georgia systems,” she added. “When the new leadership sees that local commitment, I don’t think this is going to fall apart.”

Susan Walker works with one of those stakeholders; she is policy and research director for the Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Education. There’s concern about the impending leadership shift and about possibility the state could jeopardize its Race to the Top grant, she said.

“The governor and the state school superintendent have most of the power in how we implement this, so there is this big question mark,” she said.

“I hope that everyone can see that this is a huge chunk of money for a state that is still reeling from the financial crisis,” Walker said. “Ultimately this is going to benefit our kids. It is going to help us keep going with the good things we have put in place. It is important that this momentum continue.”

And if it doesn’t, Secretary Duncan said the feds will call the race. “If any state does not implement well, we will simply stop funding them,” Duncan said.

An unprecedented federal education program that dangled $4.35 billion in competitive grants to accelerate school reforms, Race to the Top will affect 13.6 million students, a million teachers and 25,000 schools in the 12 states that won the money.

“These are taxpayer dollars. We want to make sure that each dollar is spent extremely wisely. We have every hope and every reason to believe that states will be successful,” Duncan said. “But, if at the end of the day, we are feeling that a state is not acting in good faith or doesn’t have the capacity, will or courage to implement their plan, we are absolutely prepared to stop funding a state. . .But I have every confidence that Georgia will do a great job and take student achievement to another level.”

64 comments Add your comment

Lisa B.

August 27th, 2010
10:22 am

It is my understanding that only the school systems who accepted the invitation to participate in the RTT application process with receive shares of the money. Many systems received no invitation and were not given the opportunity to participate in the process. If my understanding is correct, we must now implement the mandates without receiving RTT dollars.

HS Teacher, Too

August 27th, 2010
10:31 am

Does anyone else notice that the 2 school systems caught cheating on the CRCT are included on this list? Isn’t that a bit odd? And a third, DeKalb, is currently under investigation. And a forth, Clayton, has been so horrible that their accreditation had been revoked?

Now, the State of GA is going to TRUST them with millions of dollars?

Who is the fool?

Maureen Downey

August 27th, 2010
10:39 am

@LISaB, I think a broad invitation went out to all school systems to participate. The state was looking for a lot of participation as that was a consideration. There will be some programs that will go statewide, but some funding will go to specific local efforts. The most likely statewide thrust will be teacher evaluation tool and a student growth model.

Folks, I have a great new study by some of the most influential ed researchers that challenges the reliability of test scores to evaluate teacher performance but it is embargoed until Sunday but I will post the second that I am cleared to do so. You will find it fascinating and it will generate a lot of discussion on whether we can fairly link scores to teacher performance, even using growth models.

catlady

August 27th, 2010
10:47 am

We have spent years and millions of dollars and STILL don’t have a student tracking database as was promised. Hold those who promised this years ago accountable for their failure!

V for Vendetta

August 27th, 2010
10:51 am

I agree with HS, Too. We are playing into the crooks hands with this one.

Also, isn’t it interesting to notice how the politicos start going back and forth on the issue because they don’t know what the public wants to hear? “Do I say it’s bad because it’s fed money, or do I say it’s good because it helps education?”

They don’t care. They just to get elected. And we wonder why we’re in this mess . . . ?

RG

August 27th, 2010
10:57 am

No Child Left Behind is a great concept in theory but in all reality it is very unfair. I think we should hold our kids to high standards but at the same time we need to understand that those standards are different for everyone. In a perfect world every child can go up to be a Doctor, Lawyer or anything they want to be but that is not REALITY. I think it is important to teach our children that they need to find their own way and that whatever they become is ok as long as they put in the effort. I also agree that simply looking at test scores to measure a teacher’s performance is not only unfair to the teacher but to the students they help everyday.

What's best for kids?

August 27th, 2010
11:01 am

Another ridiculous new job under RT3: math coaches!

A Concerned Parent

August 27th, 2010
11:15 am

This is a part of what Cobb Superintendent turned down

Race to the Top Assessment Program
Aligned to goals:
•1.4: Increase the transparency of the grant application and award process.
•1.5: Maintain up-to-date information on the Department’s website about Department offices and key programs website.
•1.6: Foster more transparency in the larger educational community.
•2.1: Provide more insight into the agency’s decision-making process.
•2.3: Collect and use input from the public and other stakeholders in decision-making.
•3.1: Enhance collaboration with other federal and non-federal agencies, the public, and non-profit and private entities.
The Race to the Top Assessment Program is a $350 million grant competition designed to fill an urgent need in the nation’s educational system. It seeks to provide valid and instructionally useful assessments that provide accurate information about what students know and can do. These assessments will be anchored in standards designed to enable every student to gain the knowledge and skills needed to succeed in college or the workplace by the time he or she graduates from high school.

These grants will support the work of a consortium of States that develop and implement common, high-quality assessments aligned with common college- and career-ready K–12 standards. The use of common assessments based on common standards will promote a culture of higher expectations as well as collaboration on best practices. States will use these assessment systems to expand instructional practice and support continuous improvement that meaningfully improves school and educator effectiveness and enhances program impact.

•Comprehensive Assessment System grant. To fully meet the dual needs for accountability and instructional improvement, States need assessment systems that are based on standards designed to prepare students for college and the workplace, that more validly measure student knowledge and skills, that better reflect good instructional practices, and that support a culture of continuous improvement in education. The Comprehensive Assessment Systems grant category supports the development of such assessment systems by consortia of States. MSWord (573K)

•High School Course Assessment grant. In our nation’s high schools, the rigor of courses offered varies and, in many cases, is not sufficient to prepare students for success in college and careers. To promote consistently high levels of rigor in high school courses across a well-rounded curriculum, the High School Course Assessment grant category supports the development of high school course assessment programs by consortia of States

Increasing funding. Our proposal contains the largest request for ESEA
funding ever—both overall and for funds targeted towards teachers and
leaders. It requests historic funding for teachers and principals—a 10-percent
increase over the 2009–10 budget, to $3.9 billion.

▶▶ Responding to teachers’ voices. We’ll require annual surveys of teachers
and require districts to report the results. Teachers will collaborate in the
design of new evaluation systems.

Sharing responsibility. The responsibility for improving student outcomes
won’t fall on the teachers alone. States, districts, and school leaders will
share that responsibility. Districts that are not supporting their schools,
principals, and teachers will face interventions.

Improving evaluations. Working with teachers, principals, and other stakeholders, districts will improve evaluation systems for teachers and principals. These systems will consider student learning and other measures and will provide educators with better information to improve their practice.

A Concerned Parent

August 27th, 2010
11:17 am

Rewarding success. Great teachers will have advancement opportunities and additional compensation.
▶▶Focusing on growth. Teachers will get credit for accelerating the learning of students of all abilities. They won’t be judged simply by their students’ meeting absolute benchmarks.

▶▶Supporting teachers in closing gaps. Schools and their teachers will not be labeled as failing if one group of students is not meeting targets. Instead, we will put in place supports to help them focus on closing achievement gaps, giving local officials the flexibility to choose how to do so.

▶▶Improving achievement through flexibility. In the vast majority of schools, districts, school leaders, and teachers will have the flexibility to decide how best to improve their schools and raise student achievement. They won’t be required to offer tutoring or school choice.

Our Plan Gives Teachers Time and Support by:

▶▶Increasing collaboration time. There will be more support for time for teachers to collaborate, mentor, and work together to improve their practice.

▶▶Holding preparation programs accountable. We will make sure teacher and leader preparation programs are accountable for preparing their graduates to be successful in classrooms. We will increase the investment in preparation.

▶▶Funding relevant professional development. We will provide districts with support to implement professional development that is proven to give teachers knowledge and skills that help them improve their classroom practice.

▶▶Improving principal leadership. More focus will be put on principal development and improving the quality of school leadership, including holding principals to the same effectiveness standards as teachers.

catlady

August 27th, 2010
11:19 am

And yes, quite a few people want to “run with the money”, but not in the way you suggest.

A Concerned Parent

August 27th, 2010
11:19 am

How come the news paper has not researched the requirements from the US Dept of Ed? The citizens will want to know what was the real requirement the counties would have the establish in order to receive the grant.

A Concerned Parent

August 27th, 2010
11:22 am

Why should we have equal education in all schools?

Awful, Awful, Awful

August 27th, 2010
11:31 am

This is money that will just be “Flushed down the toilet”. Folks, it’s our tax money…..demand responsibility. Our current federal administration is killing our country……rebel against it…..vote on November 2nd.

Devil's Advocate

August 27th, 2010
11:37 am

Bush killed it…Obama is just trying to bring it back to life. But with so many brain dead right wingers out there, it will take time.

A Concerned Parent

August 27th, 2010
11:39 am

Why would Cobb county want to listen to its teachers? Why would the GA Dept of education want to implement test is related to the curriculum taught? Why would Cobb county want to go outside the box to educate the students? Why would Cobb county want to teach students outside the test? Cobb county is now sharing text books among classes in HS, some HS schools do not have online text books some schools are sharing print copy, and not using vocabulary in their HS Literature class in some schools. The biggest issue, why not use AP Math and high performance Math Teachers to create a Math book that works. What decisions involve our teachers voices?

teacher&mom

August 27th, 2010
11:47 am

One of the potential drawbacks of accepting federal money is the real possibility it will be taken away. My school applied and won a Comprehensive School Reform (CSR) grant. We were making progress and things were going well. The original grant period was three years. At the end of the first year, the federal government decided to stop the program. We managed to squeak out a second year of reform but were never able to implement the full program due to lack of funds. It was very discouraging. The outside evaluators told us that we had one of the strongest reform models. We tried to implement as much as possible, but key training sessions and supports had to be pulled due to lack of funds. It forever made me leery of relying on federal money.

Until Georgia is willing to truly fund education at a meaningful level, specifically the classroom level, we will falter. I’ve taught 16 years years and I have my EdS. I’m happy with my income level. I want more money to spend in my CLASSROOM. Our science lab is down to 8 working microscopes. We’re using up our chemicals with little hope of having money to replace them. My classes are bursting at the seam, and I’m having to beg, borrow, and steal supplies from other schools.

V for Vendetta

August 27th, 2010
12:22 pm

A Concerned Parent,

Don’t confuse equal education and equal opportunity to an education. We currently have neither.

Dr. John Trotter

August 27th, 2010
12:25 pm

RTTT. Race To The Trough!

By John R. Alston Trotter, EdD, JD

CRCT, NCLB, QBE, APEG, Minimum Foundation, A+ Program, RTTT, and on and on. None have or will significantly improve education here in Georgia. What we need is Discipline In The Classrooms (DITC), Motivation From The Students (MFTS), and Decent Parents At Home (DPAH). But, how do you fund these essential components? Harping on these essential components will not secure politicians any votes, so they think. But, I think that they will secure votes! Nonetheless, President Obama and Arne Duncan, like most politicians (George W. Bush and the late Ted Kennedy included), continue to adhere to Blame The Teachers First (BTTF). Added to this is the destructive program called Let Administrators Run Roughshod Over Teachers (LARROT). Educational Rot. This educational stench is so strong to every fair-minded and intelligent nostril. But, the masses will continue to eat the slop until someone points out that this slop is really for educational swine. RTTT? Race To The Top? No, Race To The Trough. (c) MACE, August 27, 2010.

V for Vendetta

August 27th, 2010
12:38 pm

A Concerned Parent,

I like your idea of teachers taking control of the educational process from the ground up, so I’ll take a stab at it. It doesn’t happen anywhere I know of, and it would be interesting to see how a school comprised of highly educated teachers (probably because they received multiple advanced degrees, since many claim those don’t matter) who had the autonomy to teach materials of their choice and/or creation would fare. My guess is that it would be highly successful. If it were a private institution, the pay of the teachers could be commensurate with the academic prestige of the school, which would make more sense than linking it with standardized testing scores. (Note: “academic prestige” does NOT mean financial prestige. Expansion would be the next logical step.) Of course, this all sounds a lot like capitalism, and we know how our government feels about that . . . .

But what about poorer communities, you ask? Charitable donations from various private organizations (such as the Gates scholarships) can plant the seed. Good teachers can be hired with the promise of attractive paychecks, but they can just as easily be fired for poor performance. (Anyone who currently works in education knows EXACTLY who some of the worst, laziest, and most ineffective teachers are. Firing just HALF of these teachers would send a message to the others and improve teacher quality. You don’t need tests to figure this out, just admins with good intentions and spines.) Over time, the school’s academic prowess would grow–and hopefully the community along with it. Bad students would be removed, and, after a minimum of chances, they would be removed PERMANENTLY. Frivolous and basless lawsuits would be dismissed by courts.

Sounds like a world in which I’d like to teach. Can it ever happen?

teacher are left behind

August 27th, 2010
12:51 pm

Who will monitor how the money is spent…..??? Will this really trickle down to the kids classroom and teachers having less students in classroom. What is the plan this grant is trickle on….It makes me wonder what the governor purpose of getting the money at the end of the election…..the governor has mismanaged money cut mental healthcare and placed most of the funding with his buddy in gwinnett and hometown of Warner Robins…..We need change!

A Concerned Parent

August 27th, 2010
12:55 pm

V for Vendetta

Believe me I know we do not either and it will continue if counties are not made to allow it.

GOB

August 27th, 2010
12:59 pm

So the half of the money has already been designated to be used for things that have been “in the works” for years already? The student tracking system was supposed be done quite some time ago and wasn’t a new evaluation tool just rolled out last year? Good use of $200 million dollars.

This money is not going to have any real impact on education. To start with, it’s $400 million, but split over 4 years. Half of that is for the student tracking and teacher evaluation tool.

That leaves $200 million. Assuming that the entire remaining amount goes directly to local schools (I know, I know….), that means each system that agreed to participate will get about $1.9 million dollars a year. That’s less than 2% of the Gwinnett’s budget shortfall. Does anyone truly expect that kind of paltry sum (in comparison to what is currently spent) to make any difference at all? Even if the full $400 is given straight the systems, it’s less than $4 million a year per participating system. The numbers get even smaller if money goes to systems not originally signed on.

What an enormous waste of time and energy all the way around.

A Concerned Parent

August 27th, 2010
1:01 pm

Good teachers are live urban schools because of parent non-involvement, which means parents are not looking or comparing the curriculium in various schools and how it is taught. There is the watered down education and the higher to acheive education. Parents need to fight for equal education cross the board, not by how much money is in the area. Cobb County is facing that now. Parents need to get more involved in the PTA not for fundraisers, but the help provide good education all around and to give teacher a voice without punishment.

Shar

August 27th, 2010
1:14 pm

Concerned Parent, if you are advocating spreading education dollars evenly across districts when you cadd for “equal education across the board”, I can’t agree. I live in the City of Atlanta and pay APS tax rates, and I’ll be darned if I want to pay those into some “equalization” fund where districts that do not choose to increase property taxes for K-12 education get subsidized by districts that do. But your idea of teachers directing curriculum by school, as long as they meet graduation and college entrance norms, sounds like a testable charter school idea. I wonder how many teachers would start off with some form of tracking to allow classes to be customized to the needs of the students?

EnoughAlready

August 27th, 2010
1:16 pm

This in 2010 and in many communities:
Want to be class president? Not if you’re black, in one Miss. school

The memo indicates that only white students can be president of the school’s eighth grade, while only black students can be vice president. In seventh grade, whites are the only ones who can be both president and vice president, while the only position a black student at Nettleton can apply for in sixth grade is that of the class reporter.

People like to isolate these cases to Proms and student dances; but it’s very common in communities that are unwilling and don’t ever plan to change. When I go into some communities, it’s like going through a time warp, because you get stared at and words thrown at you for pointing out ignorance. People in these communities have restaurants, churches and YMCA’s that are segregated just because of location (my side of town and their side of town).

I take my civil rights very seriously and the same goes for my family. It’s a shame that some people would still try to curtail individuals in this day and age.

"Involved Parents" needed, not just "Decent" Ones

August 27th, 2010
1:18 pm

John Trotter’s supposition that we need “Decent Parents At Home (DPAH) is more glib than substance. I would prefer to see “Involved Parents At Home” as opposed to examining their morals.

catlady

August 27th, 2010
1:55 pm

I don’t think Dr. Trotter meant “decent” as in morals, although that would be nice. I think he meant “not half-baked.” Of course, he can dispell the confusion much better than I!

I cannot believe that N. Deal can be in support of such a misuse of taxpayer monies! No matter what his friends tell him to do! And there will be a lot more of that if he is elected!

Georgia needs to get its act together!

Shar, my poor rural county taxes at 16.25 mils and STILL sends millions to places like Gwinnett for “equalization” but I can’t for the life of me figure out why! We have ONE factory in town!

EnoughAlready

August 27th, 2010
2:05 pm

CatLady, as a Gwinnett resident; I’m positive our money is going to rural communities. Gwinnett has way more taxpayers than most rural communities.

GW

August 27th, 2010
2:05 pm

Within a school, class size is the number one thing that actually affects a student’s education. Common sense should tell any human being that. The more attention one gets, the better one usually performs in any facet of life. A teacher with a manageable class size won’t need a high dollar data tracking system to know each student’s strengths and weaknesses. Any program, grant, scheme, etc. that does not lower class size will just be another waste of money and state DOE hodgepodge. In four years everybody will still be bellyaching about education and this grant will have been forgotten except for the bill to the taxpayers.

[...] The race is on. But does everyone want to run with the Race to the Top Leave a comment » The race is on. But does everyone want to run with the Race to the Top money … Atlanta Journal Constitution (blog) I think it is important to teach our children that they need to find their own way and that whatever they become is ok as long as they put in the effort. … http://blogs.ajc.com/get-schooled-blog/2010/08/27/the-race-is-on-but-does-everyone-want-to-run-with-... [...]

Cobb Teacher

August 27th, 2010
2:31 pm

While serving in the military, we used a term quite frequently that was simple in nature but adequately described a soldiers life. “Hurry up and wait.” The school systems who will get this massive chunk of cash have gone from pinching pennies to being concerned about how they are going to spend all these millions in a given period of time. Time to change gears and quickly go from one mindset to another. I thought those days were over.

Booklover

August 27th, 2010
2:35 pm

I’ve decided “Race to the Top” = “Sh*t rolls downhill.”

I fear that most districts will put the money toward support staff such as “math coaches.” Why not spend the money on FIXING the math curriculum and making math classes smaller by simply hiring more math teachers instead?

I will be shocked, *shocked* if I see ANY of this money in my high school language arts classroom. The only “improvements” I am likely to see are more interference from know-nothings, more paperwork, more constrictions, and more students in every class.

jw

August 27th, 2010
2:37 pm

My understanding is the money is for systems that have Needs Improvement Schools or schools that didn’t make AYP – in Georgia, those districts had to decide if they wanted to “opt in” and those dollars to help the schools that didn’t make AYP – it’s money to raise the standards of those schools, not to help all schools – folks need to remember that part.

V for Vendetta

August 27th, 2010
2:50 pm

Enogh Already,

Where did all of that civil rights nonsense come from? What does that have to do with anything? We are well aware that racism still persists in some areas of the country, but it has little to do with the conversation at hand. And, for the record, if you want to talk civil rights, I would argue that gay people have for more to complain about in this day and age than you do. At least you can get married if you want to.

Teacherkoolaide

August 27th, 2010
2:57 pm

Any chance politics will be involved in the spending of this money? Yeah, yeah, I’m joking of course.

EnoughAlready

August 27th, 2010
3:18 pm

V for Vendetta

August 27th, 2010
2:50 pm

Civil Rights Nonsence? You are totally out of your mind. Gay rights is a civil rights issue.

And my civil rights statement has to do with students running for whatever elected office they choose (whether they are black, gay, old, disabled or from MARS). That goes for homes, work, school, marriage, etc…. I will also take it as fars as being illegal and muslim in this country.

When you are keeping me from doing what others are allowed to do, then you are stepping on my civil rights.

oldtimer

August 27th, 2010
3:19 pm

John T…Too funny and so true!! BOAH would be any teacher’s dream.

EnoughAlready

August 27th, 2010
3:21 pm

And furthermore you don’t have a clue about what I have to worry about in this country; if you are gay, you don’t have to tell anyone. It’s between you, your partner and GOD. I can’t hide my skin color.

gilbert witherspoon

August 27th, 2010
3:23 pm

Considering the stage of turmoil at APS, the significant cash on hand already there, one would think they should be the last to be rewarded with additional funds

Booklover

August 27th, 2010
3:28 pm

My understanding is that, as the strings attached part of the RTTT funding, all Georgia school districts will have to incorporate the RTTT reforms during the following (’12-’13) school year WITHOUT additional funding. If I am misunderstanding this, feel free to set me straight. Thanks.

Teacherkoolaide

August 27th, 2010
3:39 pm

Any chance some of the money will be used to investigate the cheating scandle?

Lee

August 27th, 2010
3:54 pm

Government money ALWAYS comes with strings attached. Excuse me, let me rephrase: TAXPAYER money, which has been confiscated by threat of legal and physical force, that is doled out to the government subjects, is ALWAYS attached to the agenda of the residing party.

Heck, even the alleged teachers on this blog can’t agree whether or not it is a good thing.

I don’t know. Maybe this crop of students can learn enough to become productive citizens so they can repay China for their generous loan which probably funds this boondoggle.

catlady

August 27th, 2010
4:13 pm

EnoughAlready: I believe if you read the list of “receiving”, you will find Gwinnett. At least, that is what our superintendent has told us. I will try to find a cite.

catlady

August 27th, 2010
4:38 pm

EnoughAlready: My county has 70+% of its students on free lunch, yet acc. to the supt we “lose” 2-3 million on Fair Share, to counties including Gwinnett. I have contacted the Georgia School Council Institute for their list. Maybe it will shed some light on it.

oldtimer

August 27th, 2010
6:01 pm

I believe students and teachers will receive little to none of this money. I think class size is not the most important thing. After 32 actual years I have taught classes from 42 to 18. The 42 actually really learned!! They worked, did what I asked, and I had support of parents to keep them after school if they did not. The last reading class I had in 2006 of 18 boys, who all failed the 5th grade CRCT all passed the 6th grade test, but it was like pulling teeth. I also got called down because do many failed the first 6 weeks. Many months latter he apologised as I had the highest pass rate in the school. And all but two (180) passed the SS CRCT also…They were terrified of me and so were parents so they came to tutoring! I had been in that school forever and did not “give” grades to anyone.
Doctor John Trotter..you are correct in saying discipline is the number one thing and DPAH number two!

oldtimer

August 27th, 2010
6:07 pm

Ans Enough alread ILLEGAL immigrants really have N rights as they have already broken the law by being here. Go home nad come in legally and then they have rights…..

oldtimer

August 27th, 2010
6:08 pm

Harold

August 27th, 2010
6:11 pm

Not a penny of the Stimulus funds reached DCSS classrooms. It was spent on non-teaching positions and the scripted learning program America’s Choice for 2009-2010. See DeKalb BOE notes from 4/17/09. Instead of improving achievement, DCSS had more schools than ever that DID NOT MAKE AYP. For the BOE, Audria Berry, Director of the Office of School Improvement, who made the recommendation, and the rest of the administration who supported this program – no accountability and they took responsibility. Bear in mind this is a “scripted” learning program where the teachers follow the “script” so you can’t say they weren’t doing what Dr. Berry and her department were asking them to do:
“Presented by: Dr. Audria Berry, Executive Director, Office of School Improvement

Rationale:
“This year, the United States released an unprecedented amount of Title I funds to support the education of the most needy children, American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA)….. The additional focus is providing intensive and effective turnaround support for the lowest-performing schools…..”

Summary:
“The America’s Choice Program Design of Rigor and Readiness helps schools change patterns of low performance and close achievement gaps that may have existed for many years. ”

Financial Impact:
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Funds of 2009 will be used for this project. The cost for 14 elementary schools is $1,750,000.00, 13 middle schools is $1,950,000.00 and 13 high schools is $2,275,000.00, and Service and materials and supplies are $2,189,703.20. The total cost is $8,164,703.20″

“Requested Action
It is recommended that the Board of Education approve the purchase of America’s Choice Programs: Intensive Design and Rigor and Readiness for the 2009-2010 school year. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Funds of 2009 will be used for this project.
The total cost is $8,164,703.20

Of course the DCSS BOE approved this.

Not one teacher was added to our classrooms for direct instruction of kids. “

V for Vendetta

August 27th, 2010
6:34 pm

Enough Already,

I understand the concept of Civil Rights. Thanks. I was simply mentioning that it had no relevance on this particular blog topic. Maureen posted one in regards to the Mississippi issue.

And, are you seriously suggesting that you deserve a bigger pity party than a gay person because he can HIDE who he is? Get real. Light-skinned blacks did that often until the Civil Rights movement. It doesn’t excuse the treatment of blacks, does it? And why should a gay person have to hide it? Why can’t they be openly in love with their partners? Issues don’t always have to be about race (unless you live in Mississippi!).

Hmmm....

August 27th, 2010
10:21 pm

Enough Already, you are right…..according to what my principal has told us, funds are taken from Gwinnett and sent to counties that don’t have the tax base to ‘equalize” things……We would have more money for our schools if it didn’t get sent elsewhere……Kinda sharing the wealth, huh?