A correction worth noting: Mayor Shirley Franklin helped THOUSANDS of kids go to college

I wanted to share this note that I received from someone involved with the Mayor’s Youth Program:

As do others, I have questions about Shirley Franklin’s letter, but you’re more than right about her helping Atlanta high school seniors.   The only thing that needs correction is that she helped thousands, not just hundreds, go on to college through the Mayor’s Youth Program, and raised millions of dollars of private money to do so.   She also met with each one of these students personally to give them guidance and encouragement.   For whatever reason, the media gave very little coverage to these truly amazing efforts, and the Mayor was never one to blow her own horn.   Mayor Reed has decline to be involved in the program, which is a tragedy, but I can’t think of any other public official who would exhibit the kind of commitment to this program that she did.   Thanks for weighing in on this on the blogs.

I wanted to share this because I think anyone who did what Mayor Franklin did deserves standing ovations instead of cheap shots. I find the anonymity of blogs allows people to fling dirt and trample other people’s good names and heckle their good works. I refuse to let that go unchallenged.

I doubt few of her critics, if any, could match what Franklin did for kids as an unpaid volunteer.  Nobody pays a mayor to meet with kids and encourage them on to college. That was her own doing and her own time. Shirley Franklin may have made more lasting change in those meetings with students than with all her meetings with the City Council or members of C0ngress.

176 comments Add your comment

mike

August 21st, 2010
6:46 am

Yes my daughter attended those college sessions put on by the City of Atlanta at City Hall East. She actually found a math and science program at one of these colleges where she was invited to attend a summer program. She eventually completed a undergrad and a Master’s in Physics. I am so grateful that I took her to those college session at City Hall East put on by the City of Atlanta because the interest started there. So stop with the bashing folks.

Ernest

August 21st, 2010
7:04 am

Thanks for creating greater awareness of this, Maureen. There are many people in the community that help children other than their own with preparation for life after high school. Most don’t look for publicity they just do it because it is the right thing to do.

You are right, most of Mayor Franklin’s critics could not match what she did as an unpaid volunteer. In fact the only skill most of her critics seem to have is simply sit on the side and criticize what others are doing. Mayor Franklin is not without faults but her outreach efforts have hopefully provided better opportunities for many children.

Concerned 1

August 21st, 2010
7:43 am

Mayor Franklin came to my high school and was not pleased with the behavior of the students. Still she did give of her time. One of my students got a free laptop because of the program and assistance with college. The student came back after her first semester and said we should have cracked down on them more as college was challenging. The former mayor needs to be commended. It was a great effort. She knew about the decline in the high schools and she was trying to do something about it. The high schools on the southside were not turning around. Only the demise of the projects and a decreased population is changing them now; nothing more, nothing less.

Concerned 1

August 21st, 2010
8:20 am

The mayor was great by the way! She could hang tough with the worst of the student hecklers. She initially would come at around 10am on a week day to meet with them and talk about the program. She even made adjustments for band students who had community service parades on Saturdays when the program took place. She interacted with the students and she was genuine. I do not sling mud. I try to say what I say without malice but truth is truth. I hate what has happened to APS. Nothing can change the fact that the leadership has brought us to this terrible point in history. We are on the inside, we know. The pressure was too great for some educators and we were told by administrators that we would lose our jobs because of those test scores being too low. It is horrible! Even the students only talk about testing! They make them retest to see if they can get their GHSGT scores higher! We’re talking about the ones who have already passed. You need to look at the role of the teacher. We spend 15-25 hours a week tutoring kids for free. Teachers are being criminalized by this nonsense which has the schools burning while some administrators fiddle. It is not about the former mayor! I am sorry Dr. Hall but why don’t you talk to your own teachers. Maybe you would learn a few things.

Lee

August 21st, 2010
9:05 am

Sorry Maureen, but Shirley Franklin brought criticism upon herself when she penned the letter to Arne Duncan. The fact that Franklin participated in the Mayor’s Youth program is not relevant to the criticism she received due to the letter.

Ernest

August 21st, 2010
9:14 am

I will also go on a limb and say this blog will probably have the fewest comments because the topic is giving credit to someone for doing something positive for APS and school children. There are far more positive things happening in our schools than negative however those things don’t seem to get the attention they deserve.

Yes, we should be aggressive and diligent to correct the issues that need correcting but let’s not paint a broad brush on everything APS.

Raquel Morris

August 21st, 2010
9:52 am

Mayor Franklin is not at issue here – Beverly Hall is. Beverly Hall has failed thousands of children and should leave office immediately.

J.B. STONER

August 21st, 2010
10:11 am

Mayor Franklin is a joke.Wants control over money, is not qualified to be dog catcher.

Logically fallacy

August 21st, 2010
10:29 am

Franklin helped kids go to college, therefore she is infallible in her assessment of Beverly Hall.

Nice try Maureen but totally invalid proposition.

@Ernest

August 21st, 2010
10:33 am

“Yes, we should be aggressive and diligent to correct the issues that need correcting but let’s not paint a broad brush on everything APS”

I’d say the with the cheating scandal, and the way APS has handled the cheating scandal, they did the painting, or more accurately the whitewash. The AJC just reported the whitewash.

catlady

August 21st, 2010
10:41 am

I can also speak well of Ms. Franklin, but her letter in support of B. Hall was a very poor choice. And we know you have to live with poor choices.

Logical consequence

August 21st, 2010
10:52 am

“There are far more positive things happening in our schools than negative however those things don’t seem to get the attention they deserve.”

A logical consequence Ernest, of APS bringing negative attention to itself for having the largest cheating scandal in Georgia’s educational history.

Bernie Madoff gave over three million dollars to charity, but no one talks about that. Is that the people’s fault or his fault?

MR. NADS

August 21st, 2010
10:54 am

What a terrible mayor, just like ‘fat’ Maynard,cheating Campbell , and corousing Andy (got your back,MLK).
Sam Massell was last of good mayors. Time to go back to reality.

JUST LIKE IN THE WHITE HOUSE!!

NWGA teacher

August 21st, 2010
11:35 am

I commend anyone who has had that sort of impact on lives, but I second Raquel Morris.

There are always personal and political debts to be paid, and the downside is that blowback can be cold. For that particular letter, it’s going to be very cold, indeed.

Shar

August 21st, 2010
11:36 am

Shirley Franklin’s personal effort on behalf of failing high school students merely points out the fact that she knew during her tenure that they needed more than APS was giving them. Using this as an excuse or mitigation for her desperate, and extremely inappropriate, appeal to her (Democratic) federal friends to try to intimidate the AJC and derail the intervention that was clearly coming from a Republican statehouse with a history of noncooperation with her former administration is unconvincing at best and disingenuous at worst. The character witnesses who come forward after a murder conviction to claim that the perpetrator deserves sympathy because she was a great Cub Scout den mother are similarly unconvincing.

MR. NADS

August 21st, 2010
11:37 am

I see catlady is back, tauting her love of the black mayor and president.

Tonya T.

August 21st, 2010
11:40 am

Shar summed it up. Helping kids is nice, but the city of Atlanta is a cesspool and B. Hall a fraud. Even the worst of humans has some positive attributes, but positive doesn’t cancel all the other negative.

Maureen Downey

August 21st, 2010
11:47 am

@Logically, I made no comment on the letter, which I think was an odd effort in that I am not sure what Arne Duncan could do or would want to do. I just get tired of the bashing on this blog made under the cover of dark. That is why I have to give Dr. Trotter credit; he signs his name. I don’t agree with Dr. Trotter on many things, but I admire his willingness to take ownership of his bristle. I suspect that someday mass media blogs — those on newspaper and magazine sites — will require names and registration. Yes, it will cut down on comments, but I think it will improve quality of both comments and discourse.
Maureen

Proud Black Man

August 21st, 2010
11:58 am

Thanks for the thread Maureen. Most decent people know what the deal is.

Keeping It Real

August 21st, 2010
12:02 pm

Mr. Nad is a hater and probably does nothing but criticize people who are trying to make a difference.

J.B. STONER

August 21st, 2010
12:06 pm

Mr.Nads makes very valid points regarding previous mayors in Atlanta.

This is an ongoing problem in all major cities due to white america being forced out of inner citys.

The solution is to move back in and take over.

Same holds true in Washington DC.

J.B. STONER

August 21st, 2010
12:09 pm

Keeping it Real nedds to do just that- keep it real.
Franklin has never made a difference,period.
Another money taking official who runs nothing but a big mouth.

Lee

August 21st, 2010
1:12 pm

“I suspect that someday mass media blogs — those on newspaper and magazine sites — will require names and registration. Yes, it will cut down on comments, but I think it will improve quality of both comments and discourse.”

By “improving qualiity” you mean the comments will become more bland and politically correct, then yes, requiring names will do that. But when a young lady of age can be forced to resign because of a picture of her merely holding a glass of wine, then it is little wonder most of us who are gainfully employed do not want to post our names.

BTW, John Trotter and MACE are one in the same. He uses this blog to promote his agenda and hopefully, enroll more members in MACE.

Ernest

August 21st, 2010
1:55 pm

I suspect that someday mass media blogs — those on newspaper and magazine sites — will require names and registration. Yes, it will cut down on comments, but I think it will improve quality of both comments and discourse.

Maureen, I agree with that point. Hiding behind the cloak of anonymity allows some to post things they would not dare say in a public setting. It would be interesting to see if the level of the discussion goes up as a result of that.

J.B. STONER

August 21st, 2010
2:02 pm

Earnest t. Bass- whats YOUR real name??

Dr. John Trotter

August 21st, 2010
2:21 pm

Maureen: Thank you for your kind words. I was just about to sign on under my name a couple of hours ago, but kept getting phone calls.

I too like Shirley Franklin. If I am not mistaking, I think that she hails from Philadelphia but married an Augusta man. I was reading the biography of Amanda America Dickson, a lady once heralded as the richest African American woman in America, who hailed from Hancock County, Georgia. She later moved to Augusta and died fairly young. I believe that Mayor Franklin married into this family. I could be wrong. But, from putting the pieces together (and I don’t have the book with me now; it is in the MACE library), there is the Mayor Franklin connection to Amanda America Dickson as well as to Holsey Temple C. M. E. Church in downtown Macon — the church, by the way, in which State Representative Darryl Jordan (D – Fayetteville-Jonesboro-Riverdale) and his family attended. (I attended one of Representative Jordan’s daughter’s wedding in this church and drove past this Washington Street church almost daily while I was attending Mercer Law School.)

Mayor Franklin has a rich history here in Atlanta, and I remember seeing this pretty lady walking the corridors of City Hall while she was Mayor Young’s Chief of Staff nearly 30 years ago. If she is indeed part of the Amanda America Dickson family, I then know that she was related to a man who was considered one of the South’s chief agriculturists of his day, David Dickson of Hancock County. His “mistress” was an African American slave named Julia Lewis, and their love was America Amanda Dickson. (It’s been said that this baby was the result of a rape, but Julia Lewis was openly treated later as his mistress, and went by the name of Julia Lewis Dickson. ) The daughter was Mr. Dickson’s only child and he doted upon her and the mother. He left virtually all of his huge estate to his child Amanda. A group of white relatives challenge Mr. Dickson’s will, but it was upheld in the Superior Court in Hancock County and later in the Georgia Supreme Court.

I believe that Methodist Bishop Lovick Pierce, who also hailed from Hancock County, had witnessed Mr. Dickson’s signature of the will and testified to its veracity in the courts. Bishop Pierce was a very popular Methodist orator and even served later in life as President of Emory. At one time, Bishop Pierce was the Presiding Elder in the Augusta area where Amanda America Dickson had a splendid house in the height of the time of the Black Codes after the U. S. Civil War.

My fourth great grandfather, Robert West Alston, owned a large plantation in the Shoulderbone area of Hancock County. In fact, at the time, he was the largest landowner in the county. This county was actually considered the cultural center of Georgia, right next door to the Capital in Milledgeville. The county had horse-racing, and many of the aristocrats of this era (before college football, heh?) spent much time and money on this activity as well as on cock-fighting. (How ‘Bout Them Gamecocks!) Governors Northern and Colquitt came from Hancock County as did Lovick Pierce, considered the Father of Georgia Methodism. (Bishop Pierce’s accomplishments are outlined on the historic plaque in from of the historic Mulberry Street United Methodist Church in Macon which is located less than a mile from Holsey Temple C. M. E. Church in Macon. By the way, Holsey Temple as well as Holsey Memorial C. M. E. Church in Sparta was named after Bishop Holsey who is also connected to the Amanda America Dickson family.) Robert West Alston had thirteen children and has an in-town house that is still being lived today. Some Dicksons were living in it the last time I checked. The last white superintendent of schools in Hancock County was a Dickson, and the first African American superintendent was Marvin E. Lewis, a man I have met and talked to on a number occasions. (Amanda Dickson’s mother was Lewis.) I can’t help but to think that Superintendents Dickson and Lewis were descendents from the same families of the aforementioned David Dickson and Julia Lewis. Hence, some connections, albeit convoluted, to Mayor Shirley Franklin.

I certainly take my hat off to Mayor Franklin for her unheralded and quiet work with the youth of Atlanta, ensuring that many had the funds to attend college. This is very commendable. But, I respectfully differ with the Mayor on the viability of the Beverly Hall Administration. I have witnessed people whose lives have been damaged by the asinine actions of the Reign of Terror on Trinity Avenue. The interests of the children are not being served when classroom discipline is jettisoned, and dubious testing machinations take place.

Maureen, I get carried away sometimes when I write about historic matters. Everything is so intertwined. By the way, did you know that the first Chair of the Atlanta Board of Education was ole Joe Brown, Civil War governor of Georgia and successful businessman from Dade County? Brown Middle School in West End is named after him. They were once the Rebels (when a high school during segregation) but now are the Dolphins, though I haven’t seen any Dolphins on Peeples Street and Abernathy Boulevard lately. Abernathy Boulevard supplanted the name “Gordon Street” — named after Governor John B. Gordon, a close political and business associate of Joe Brown, but this is another story. The third member of the famed Georgia Bourbon Triumvirate, besides Gordon and Brown, was Governor Alfred Colquitt who, as I mentioned earlier, was from Hancock County, but is buried in the historic Rose Hill Cemetery in Macon on Riverside Drive. Henry W. Grady, the AJC’s Godfather, was the huge promoter of this Triumvirate which dominated Georgia politics for about 25 years. My great, great grandfather, Robert A. Alston, was Gordon’s attorney and was Grady’s partner at the old Atlanta Daily Herald. He was DeKalb’s only State Representative in the late 1870s and was murdered in the Georgia Capitol. Governor Colquitt was crying at Alston’s side as he was dying. My grandfather, Robert Alston Trotter, Alston’s oldest grandchild, was born in 1883 at Meadownook, the old Alston house (second oldest house in Atlanta) on Alston Drive in front of the East Lake Country Club.

Gotta run! Taco Bell, baby! Now you know the rest of the story…and why I enjoy Georgia’s rich history! Mayor Franklin, don’t hide your children’s roots! (I do not mean to suggest that you are hiding their roots. Sorry.) They have a rich heritage from Augusta. Now correct me if I am wrong, OK? I’ve been wrong before…back in 1973. LOL! I might delve into Mayor Young’s family from New Orleans and his Denison University days! I have a lot of respect for Mayor Young.

Maureen, if I didn’t have folks occasionally fightin’ mad at me and calling me names (their favorite is “crazy,” which I often call myself), then I’d be questioning whether I was really living. I take to controversy like labs take to water! I love it! It means I’m living, not just existing. I agree so much with Thoreau (or was it Emerson?) who said that most men and women live lives of “quiet desperation.” Have a good weekend. You deserve it!

Dr. John Trotter

August 21st, 2010
2:27 pm

Maureen: I have one in the hopper…Probably got caught because of length. Gotta run to Taco Bell now! Eat like a pig one day and then Taco Bell the next day! LOL. Some nice comments about Mayor Franklin (she could use some nice words now; this blog is tough) and some history added to it. You guys have a good weekend! Oh, please release the fellow from the filter. Thanks!

J.B. STONER

August 21st, 2010
6:22 pm

Only thing Franklin has helped is HERSELF. Look it up.

Dr. John Trotter

August 21st, 2010
6:24 pm

“Ernest”: I beg to differ from you. I work for MACE which stands wholly on its own…and pays taxes both to the State and to the Federal Governments, by the way. But, thanks for the back-handed compliment anyway (I think). LOL.

Please forgive my typos and left-out words in the rather lengthy post above. I should have re-read it carefully.

I have no real problem with people (or the one person) who take shots at me fairly regularly — like the one I just addressed. I just take it as an opportunity to respond. But, I take lots of issue with some posters who nastily talk about adults’ children. Children should always be off limits, as well as someone’s pysical attributes. How God makes someone is not determined by that person. If I am short and want to be tall, it’s nothing that I can do about it. These types of things should be off-limits. Issues of integrity, honesty, policy, practices, and perhaps even political and/or educational stupidity are, in my opinion, fair game.

luangtom

August 21st, 2010
6:35 pm

Just what does whether or not Shirley Franklin helped a number of children gain further education have to do with the FAILURE of the APS? Well, Beverly Hall was hired under her watch as mayor. So, she may have personally helped individuals, but she did little to enhance the system and stem its FAILURE of the vast majority of the students within the system. By FAILURE, I mean a system that did little to improve or weed out those teachers and administrators that felt the need to cheat in order to promote the success of the system. So, Beverly Hall and Shirley failed the APS and the children. Period. By the way, where are the missing millions of dollars from the airport and other entities under Shirley’s watch that could have helped improve APS?

Logical fallacy

August 21st, 2010
6:36 pm

“@Logically, I made no comment on the letter, which I think was an odd effort in that I am not sure what Arne Duncan could do or would want to do. I just get tired of the bashing on this blog made under the cover of dark.”

Maureen, sure enough you made no comment on the letter. But there is a built in implication, IMHO, that you posted Franklin’s deeds to give more credence to the letter and to her point of view that Beverly Hall is the correct choice to lead APS at this time. If Franklin had called for Hall to resign, a position you’ve stated you do not agree with, are we to believe you would have been every bit as adamant about bringing Franklin’s previous contributions up?

If you did not in fact write this post to increase Franklin’s credibility because she is pushing, as you have admitted you are pushing, for Dr. Hall to stay, just say so. If you did not post this as part of any effort to influence public opinion that Dr. Hall should stay, then just state that for the record, and then it will be up to the readers to believe you or not, right?

Now I have a question about the anonymous nature of the blog. Isn’t criticizing someone’s point because they are anonymous, in essence an ad hominen attack? Does 2 + 2 not equal 4 because the person who posted it chose to remain anonymous? I don’t think so.

I can see your point in some cases. If someone anonymously says “X was drunk and passed out at Piedmont Park” that would be an attack that should not be allowed, because there is no way to verify it. But if it’s an opinion based on publicly acknowledged fact such as “A person who heads a school system where 58 schools have cheated has shown such a lack of institutional control that they should be replaced” how does the knowing who said it affect the validity of the opinion at all? The thing that should be verified in that case is the facts the opinion are based on are correct, and the AJC has done a more than adequate job of doing that.

Having said all of that, I’m glad Dr. Trotter is uniquely positioned, and very willing to tell it like it is. Ed Johnson and John Sherman as well. As far as Dr. Trotter, given how right he was in retrospect about APS and DeKalb, it might be time for the AJC to engage in turnabout is fair play and give him some credit, as many times as he has been attacked in the past by the AJC. Have you publicly credited Dr. Trotter for being one of the very first and most vocal people to talk about the specter of widespread, systemic cheating? Has Cynthia Tucker? That would be a “fair and balanced” approach, would it not?

J.B. STONER

August 21st, 2010
6:38 pm

Iuangton —

Spoken with common sence.

More should do so.
Get the blinders people and recognize trouble in office, Franklin was just that.

END OF STORY

J.B. STONER

August 21st, 2010
7:04 pm

Sam Massel — good mayor
Ivan Allen – ok mayor
Maynard Jackson- fat joke
Bill Cambell — thief
Andy Young -MLK wanna be
Shirley Franklin — worse than 2 above listed, couldnt control the money and help break the city.

Any more analysis needed???

NWGA teacher

August 21st, 2010
7:29 pm

@ Maureen: “Under cover of darkness” is the only way most teachers can comment on a blog.

J.B. STONER

August 21st, 2010
7:29 pm

CORRECTION-

Worse than 3 listed above.
Sorry for the typo.
I’m only human.

Donnie Touchdown

August 21st, 2010
8:02 pm

Reed and his entire staff are arrogant SOBs.

Dr. John Trotter

August 21st, 2010
8:03 pm

“Logical Fallacy”: Thanks for the kind words, but I don’t need to be credited. Really. My words (spoken rather boldly) speak for themselves. And newspapers will get things wrong occasionally, but it is good to have blogs like this one to get the other viewpoint out there. For the record, I was the first person (me, not MACE) who called for the resignation of Nedra Ware and Gang on the Clayton School Board way back in March of 2003. After my call for their resignations (and I had recruited and helped six of the nine board members to get elected — hence the heaping of blame on me), the Clayton News/Daily, the Clayton Chamber of Commerce, the AJC, and other entities started calling for their resignations. What the public did not know is that I had written a private letter (nine pages, single-spaced) to these board members (they were not talking to me then, but I was being called every name in the book, including “Puppet Master”) and told them explicitly that they could not micromanage and without risking the wrath of SACS. (I only wish that SACS today would hold the same standard for DeKalb and Atlanta). My letter later popped in a school board meeting.

Blogs are good because they allow the public to have input to correct the record. I had no problem being called a “Svenghali” (although that is one word I actually had to look up) or a “Dimestore Demagogue” (although I would have preferred being called a “Dollar General Demagogue”) or “race baiter” (although the media ignored the white candidates whom I had helped each election, even in school board races — like Dr. Sue Ryan whom I recruited and ran her campaign in 2002, and she won by four votes). I never asked any media outlet, including the AJC, if I could respond. I knew the truth would come out later, and my friends and family all knew what was happening, and this is really what matters. One journalist even wrote a column on me and said that I had “hypnotic powers.” Now this I wish were true! LOL.

I wrote a letter several years subsequent to this hype to Lyle Harris (who had scorched me quite well; he is a good writer and loved to call me a “Svenghali,” and I hope that I am spelling this word correctly) about an interesting and funny article which he had written. I signed my letter, “John Trotter, The Southside Svenghali.” He wrote me back and said that I was the last person whom he had expected to hear from. The fellow who described me as having “hypnotic powers” in a column in the Clayton News/Daily is one of my close personal friends to this day. We talk several times per week. Victor Hill mistakenly arrested me while I was at a school board meeting, holding up a very pointed sign with a political message — in the very back of the auditorium. I spend about 26 to 28 hours in “the hole” with cold air blowing on me in the dead of winter, was roughed up by some deputies (but you know that I was giving them an earful, right?), and had to rely on my friends to retain Steve Frye to go before the judge to get me out. A few days later, the charges were summarily dismissed. Victor and I laugh about that. He is a friend of mine, and I don’t care what anyone thinks. (Victor and I do not hide our friendship. This too is why I like Charley Griswell so much. He’ll come by my office or call, and we will end up in a very public restaurant. If Charley Griswell is your friend, he doesn’t really care who knows. He is your friend.) I have been in a few jails, but I can truly say that “Victor’s Jail” is the worst experience of all — a real disincentive to return!

In politics, you fight hard, but you cannot afford to hold grudges. I have had many a meal with Victor and friends since that cold January night in 2007. Oh how I was blistered in the local and national media about this situation also (”Union Leader Gets Arrested At School Board Meeting,” etc.). The truth always comes to light later. There’s no sense in taking years off of your life stressing, worrying, and harboring grudges. Even nice Jim Wooten wrote a whole article on the editorial page, excoriating me when I was attacking Roy Barnes back in 1999 for doing away with due process for teachers. I was rough on Roy. I admit this. I was mad as heck with Roy then. I don’t hold any grudges against Roy today, though. And I certainly hold no ill feelings toward Jim Wooten. In fact, Mr. Wooten is one of my favorites with the AJC. He’s a good Son of Willingham and had to work hard all of his life. He’s also a UGA grad.

Henry Grady said about my great, great grandfather Robert Alston after his murder in the State Capitol: Alston never stayed mad longer than about five minutes at a time. But, Mary Gay, in Life in Dixie During the Civil War, said that when he did get mad his eyes would flame like a lion’s (or words to this effect). Get mad but don’t harbor grudges. You’ll usually live much longer. Alston learned to control his genetically-derived temper. He came from “the Dueling Alstons,” and his father, Willis Alston, killed the Florida Speaker of the House, Leigh Read, after Read had killed his brother, Augustus Alston, the leader of the Whigs in Tallahassee, in a duel. (The Read-Alston Duel is probably the most famous of all duels in Florida history.) One last note, and I will call it quits for the evening (I hope): After Alston’s death, his partner in Alston & Calhoun on Broad Street was Patrick (Pat) Calhoun, grandson of the legendary John C. Calhoun of South Carolina, the South’s most noted fire-eater prior to the Civil War. Calhoun joined up with John Spalding and Alexander C. King to form the firm of Calhoun, King, & Spalding. Calhoun was involved in one of the most spectacular “almost” duels of the 1880s. Dueling was forbidden by law by this time in Georgia, and the parties left Atlanta for Alabama, but they later returned by rail car laughing, smoking cigars together, and, no doubt, sipping on the corn liquor. The story is on-line via the History of King & Spalding. Calhoun eventually left the firm and engaged in developments in Cleveland and San Francisco. But, he also married into one of the wealthiest families in Charleston, and the couple’s house, if I am not mistaken, is part of the Charleston Battery to this day.

RJ

August 21st, 2010
8:13 pm

While I didn’t agree with Ms. Franklin’s letter, I do think that she did a lot of good for the city of Atlanta. This is a great article that points out much of what she did for the city’s youth. Kudos for her making a difference in the lives of children.

J.B. STONER

August 21st, 2010
8:15 pm

Dr.Trotter needs therapy, mygod.

@Dr. Trotter

August 21st, 2010
8:24 pm

Would that be the same King and Spalding that just had a member of their firm on the infamous blue ribbon committee, seeing no conflict of interest even though King and Spalding has done hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of business with APS during Hall’s tenure?

My how things do come full circle in Terminus.

Dr. John Trotter

August 21st, 2010
8:29 pm

What’s up, J. B.? I thought that you had died a few years ago. No, I’m just chilling this evening. No therapy, but I did make it to my health club (my sons insist that I not refer to it as a “spa”) for the first time in two months — but I spent 31 days in Rio, and I have a good excuse. Five Fresco Tacos (crunchy) and a good walk this afternoon. Sipping on some sour mash, eating some cashews, and about to smoke on my pipe while I watch the NFL Channel. Live is good, especially when you aren’t hatin’ on folks. J. B., I do indeed appreciate your keen analysis of what I wrote, and I also appreciate the good work that Mayor Shirley Franklin has done all these years with the youth of Atlanta.

Dr. John Trotter

August 21st, 2010
8:43 pm

That would be the same King & Spalding. It appears to me that when a school board hires a big firm like King & Spalding that the board is buying influence or protection, if you will. The rates of these firms are outrageously high, but the senior partners know the judges quite well. It is always better to know the judges than know the law, as the old saying goes. By the way, Robert Alston’s two nephews, Robert Cotten Alston and Philip H. Alston, Sr., started in 1893 what has become, through various mergers, Alston & Bird. I don’t know if it is doing any school board work. I don’t think that it is. K & S and A + B (the latter firm uses the “+” symbol) are probably the two largest firms in Georgia (and perhaps the Southeast) which are headquartered in Atlanta.

By the way, President Woodrow Wilson (obviously before he became President Wilson) did some (very little, besides his aunt’s estate) legal work here on Marietta and Forsyth Streets in the old Grant Building in the early 1880s. A display of his office was replicated during the time of the 1988 Democratic Convention here in Atlanta. He was disgusted with Atlanta, thinking that it was too full of husksterism, with lawyers among the most hustling of types. He later became the President of Princeton, Governor of New Jersey, and was elected POTUS in 1912 and 1916. He married a Georgia girl here in Georgia.

Douchey Jones

August 21st, 2010
8:43 pm

Shirley Franklin didn’t help anyone, tax payers did. BTW she was a horrible mayor that allowed the corruption in this city to go on and on and on. if I murder 5 people but help 1,000 does that make me a good person? nope sure doesn’t

One the other hand

August 21st, 2010
8:44 pm

“I wanted to share this because I think anyone who did what Mayor Franklin did deserves standing ovations instead of cheap shots.”

You might want to ask the five cops The Sunday Paper profiled who, after suffering catastrophic injuries defending the citizens of Atlanta, had to go to court repeatedly to force Franklin’s administration to live up to even their most basic of legal obligations to those officers who sacrificed their careers and their long term health for Atlanta’s citizens.

She may have done some good work with the high school kids, but let’s not kid ourselves that we are bad mouthing Mother Teresa.

J.B. STONER

August 21st, 2010
8:47 pm

Dr. Trotter …………

I aint hatin’ on folks’ , just tellin the way it is.

If you think Shirley girl is all that (and she WASN’T) as mayor, then you must be enjoying circuling the toilet with your great president.

So have another PBR, eat another chalupa, and put that in your bong and toke it.

J.B. STONER

August 21st, 2010
8:48 pm

OH, Dr. Trot ….

see ‘One the other hand and Douchey Jones above…
Still lovin it,huh??

Earl of Ft. Liquordale

August 21st, 2010
8:51 pm

Batman always needs a Joker! The Mrs. and I are loving this debate! Pouring it on, Dr. Trotter! They can’t hang with an old Clayco Thug!

Hey Mayor Franklin, you helped my grand nephew too! You may remember him. He was probably the only light skin cracka in the program, but my brother and his son really appreciate what you did for him! He graduated from college, lives in Newton County with his wife and two kids! Thanks, Maureen, for pointing at the good that Mayor Franklin has done with all the kids in Atlanta!

J.B. STONER

August 21st, 2010
8:52 pm

A Clat Co. thug………

I thought I smelled a rat………..

J.B. STONER

August 21st, 2010
8:53 pm

A Clay Co. thug, I MEAN…………

Who can answer this?

August 21st, 2010
8:54 pm

Something I don’t think the AJC highlights enough. Maybe someone will shed some light. Have anyone ever talked with any teacher who said testing procedure at their school would allow the teacher the time and the space needed to make the astronomical amount of erasure marks that were made on the CRCT?

I’m sure there are other ways teachers can take shortcuts, but when it comes to wrong to right erasures, doesn’t the preponderance of the evidence point to the fact that only administrators would have the time and unfettered access to the tests needed to make such changes?

There still seems to be a public perception that teachers did this, and for all their good reporting, they AJC hasn’t mentioned, outside of a couple of occasions, how highly unlikely that would be in this particular scandal.

Teachers at the schools involved, if you don’t already see that you are being targeting as the low hanging fruit to be made a scapegoat of, you better open your eyes.