New national dropout rates: 25 percent of all students; nearly 40 percent of black and Hispanic kids fail to graduate on time

Today brings grim national data on high school graduation.

Among the findings of the  National Center for Education Statistics entitled, “Public School Graduates and Dropouts from the Common Core of Data: School Year 2007-08:

-In the report, Georgia’s average graduation rate was 65.4 percent. Our lowest rate was among Hispanic students at 55.4 percent.  In 2007-2008, Georgia had 20,135 dropouts.

-There were 613,379 dropouts from high school (grades 9 through 12) with an overall event dropout rate of 4.1 percent across all 49 reporting states and the District of Columbia in 2007–08. Indiana and New Jersey were tied for the lowest dropout rate at 1.7 percent while Louisiana had the highest event dropout rate at nearly 7.5 percent. The median dropout rate across the 49 reporting states and the District of Columbia was 4.1 percent

-Across the 47 states that were able to report high school dropouts by gender, the dropout rate was higher for males than for females at 4.6 percent and 3.5 percent, respectively.7 The dropout rate was higher among males in every state. The male-female gap ranged from 0.3 percent in Nevada to 2.7 percent in Louisiana.

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan issued this statement:

“Today’s report confirms that our nation faces a dropout crisis. When 25 percent of our students – and almost 40 percent of our black and Hispanic students – fail to graduate high school on time, we know that too many of our schools are failing to offer their students a world-class education.

“President Obama’s agenda addresses the dropout crisis with an unprecedented commitment to turn around our lowest-performing schools, including the 2,000 high schools that produce half of our nation’s dropouts and as many as three-quarters of minority dropouts. With $4 billion available for these turnarounds, we have the resources to transform these schools from dropout factories to college graduation academies. Our agenda also includes new resources to support states’ efforts to build data systems that measure whether students are on track for graduation – and how to help them if they’re not.

“I believe that improving our nation’s graduation rate is absolutely essential to the future of our economy and the future of our nation. I look forward to working with educators across America to raise graduation rates and improve the lives of millions of high school students.”

119 comments Add your comment

Tony

June 2nd, 2010
11:35 am

Obama said, “When 25 percent of our students – and almost 40 percent of our black and Hispanic students – fail to graduate high school on time, we know that too many of our schools are failing to offer their students a world-class education.”

Excuse me for being so blunt, but the schools alone have not created this problem. To make the claim that the schools are “failing to offer” is an outright lie, because in every case there is a high school located in the area where these students are dropping out. The school is offering an education to everyone who shows up to take advantage of its services.

The socio-economic problems that lead to the drop-out crisis are being ignored when politicians try to place the blame squarely upon the schools. Poverty is one of the biggest predictors for drop-out rates. In areas where schools are struggling, you will also find high proportions of students affected by poverty and crime. There is also a connection to families’ values for education. Schools in these areas face unprecedented problems that are insurmountable by the school alone. Social services, crime prevention, healthcare for children and many other services must become part of the equation.

There are some cultures that reward drop-outs with low-paying jobs. The earlier a teen is able to go to work, the better it is for the family. One family I met with this year was very unconcerned about their child’s lack of progress in math. “All he needs to be able to do is count chickens.” Can you believe this? Is the school to blame when families bring these beliefs to the table?

Improving the graduation rate should be a priority, but schools can not bear the sole responsibility for doing so. Joint programs must be developed. Communities must examine their beliefs and practices the support completion of high school.

Stop beating up on schools for a problem that is much bigger.

Dekalb County taxpayer

June 2nd, 2010
11:38 am

The metro-Atlanta area is filled with illegal immigrants who do not appear to have reached a very high level of education in their home countries. Their children, though bright, are going to be strongly affected by being brought up in households with parents who are poorly educated and perhaps even illiterate in their native language. For Mr. Duncan to brand the schools as failures without mentioning this elephant in the room is ridiculous.

Ashley Nicole

June 2nd, 2010
11:42 am

these two groups also have the highest teen pregancy rates so lets stop splitting hairs. In pevious generations parents always told their kids what else do you have to do between the ages of five and seventeen education is your job. Parents wanted their off-spring to be prepared for society and all the ills that come with it , at least get a high-school diploma thats not asking to much, besides kids have more opportunities now but they don’t want to work for it what a waste

[...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Stacy Skelly, Maureen Downey. Maureen Downey said: New national dropout rates: 25 percent of all students; nearly 40 percent of black and Hispanic kids fail to gradu… http://bit.ly/du19mc [...]

JB

June 2nd, 2010
12:05 pm

Tony, Obama did not make that statement.

ScienceTeacher671

June 2nd, 2010
12:06 pm

Tony already said it all.

Education in this country will never improve so long as all the responsibility and consequences are assigned to the schools and teachers.

JB

June 2nd, 2010
12:07 pm

But I absolutely agree with your statements

EnoughAlready

June 2nd, 2010
12:10 pm

It doesn’t matter the reason; the issue is that once they drop out of highschool, they drop into prison or on welfare.

I would rather have kids chained to a desk and chair; than take care of them in prison or on welfare.

I’m willing to do anything to educate these kids. It might sound extreme, but the consequences are much worse.

Tony

June 2nd, 2010
12:11 pm

I apologize for the inaccurate reference. Duncan said, “…

An advocate for public education change & choice

June 2nd, 2010
12:11 pm

There is no uniform definition of what constitutes a “dropout” which is a key point when examining these reported metrics.

Furthermore, there are differing definitions to determine what constitutes a high school graduate for the purposes of these metrics as well.

I say all this to say, I know there is clearly a problem on the ground to be dealt with, but the metrics reported around the problem may not be helping us really drill down on the issue.

There are any number of contributing factors not the least of which is the fact in GA by law teens are allowed to take themselves out of school at 17 when they are not even in the eyes of the law legally adults. Go figure.

catlady

June 2nd, 2010
12:23 pm

Enough already: the problem with your chained to the desk scenario is that those kids are disturbing the learning of the others around them. I would make it easier to drop or be kicked out, and immediately, mandatorily into the military or bootcamp or mandatory training program. When a student has decided they don’t want to be a part of middle or high school education, they should be removed into something that will give them a skill and some discipline (and rendered temporarily able to be a part of conception).

We have too many kids who put in time starting in 5th or 6th grade, meanwhile dragging the real learners with them.

lyncoln

June 2nd, 2010
12:39 pm

Yes, studies will have different definitions of ‘dropout’ and ‘graduate’ but the study defines what they mean for their purposes.

Oddly, the dropout rate for Georgia doesn’t go up for the senior year. Actually it goes DOWN. Apparently Georgia loses higher percentages of students during the 9th, 10th, and 11th grade years than 12th grade. I wonder why?

I’m guessing the dropouts were held back/delayed and reached 17 before becoming a senior. Or, the students just stop attending school but haven’t reached 17. In the latter case, it would be the courts/law enforcement to enforce truancy laws, not really the school’s issue. In the former case, that would suggest that schools are demanding students to actually learn material and pass classes and students are electing not to try/give up on learning the material.

I had your same reaction Tony. If 25% of delayed graduates aren’t receiving a ‘world class education’, then what are we giving to the 75% who do graduate on time? Those graduating students must have been in similar classes at the same school. They must have followed the same curriculum set by the school board/state. They must have had similar teachers and similar textbooks. I would hate to think that those graduating students are also failing to receive a ‘world class education’ too.

Nikole

June 2nd, 2010
12:47 pm

Is it wrong if they graduate, but not on time?

Angela

June 2nd, 2010
12:53 pm

Let’s keep in mind people Hispanics and African Americans are the reported ones. The other families tend to pay for aborations, send their daughters off, send them to other schools, etc. Hispanics are of a difference cultural tradition and beliefs two of which is no birth control and condoms. As for the African Americans I think we tend to seek more attention and lack proper guidance.

As for the caucasians who seem to be never mentioned when it comes to teen pregancy again, these students have parents who pay for aborations, etc. And, lets all be for real sex is promoted in every sense of the word, in clothes, television, music, – phones, parks, cars, bill boards, (as in advertisement) etc, I see young ladies (girls) whose parents are buying the clothing that screams SEX – and this is NOT limited to just Hispanic and African American females – Walk the Malls!!!!!!!!!!! And, these are the students who have been given material LOVE and not emotional LOVE!

high school teacher

June 2nd, 2010
1:16 pm

Notice the huge disparity between the dropout rate and the graduation rate. The acutal rate of students who graduate is 95%, a far cry from the 75% figure of graduating in four years. Failing to graduate on time is different than not graduating. “Extended time” is by far the most common accommodation that I have seen on IEPs, and I have seen a lot of them, yet when kids need extended time to graduate, the schools suddenly become “failng.” Arne Duncan makes me sick. Maybe we should blame the national school figurehead for our failing schools. He has just as much responsibility as the rest of us.

Kay

June 2nd, 2010
1:20 pm

Well said, Tony.

joe

June 2nd, 2010
1:24 pm

Some of the blame needs to lie at the feet of the parents…but when these drop outs entertain a life filled with gangs and drugs, and the money the can earn as runners, lookouts, dealers, etc that “get paid now” life trumps any thought of them flipping burgers as a teenager and staying in school and going on to college. My parents raised me right, I did flip burgers for a while and also worked in a grocery store, graduated, then went on to college. I praise my parents for being tough on me back then as it paid off. Just wish today’s teens took the same approach.

Confussedd

June 2nd, 2010
1:30 pm

Yes, we will solve this problem by President Obama “efforts to build data systems that measure whether students are on track for graduation – and how to help them if they’re not” This translates to wasting millions on tests, computer programs and consultants. We do not need more data to know that kids from poor minority neighborhoods with little family support or functional families for that matter will often be dropouts. The school and teachers cannot control all of that but a test sure will not. Another commission is the political solution. President Obama is just as out of touch as President Bush . The Obama children go to a high speed, expensive, elite private school he could care less, the guy is a snake.

Ashley Nicole

June 2nd, 2010
1:41 pm

I agree with joe I graduated in 1976 and had a job each summer and I did it in four years taking six subjects each year. We didn’t have all this computer technology, stop making excuses for these kids in 2010 they should be able to graduate in four years or less, giving them more time is giving them more excuses , that type of thinking is really preparing them for the real world,not.

Tony

June 2nd, 2010
1:42 pm

nikole and hs teacher hit on a very important point about graduation rate. As it is presently calculated, the graduation rate is nothing more than an efficiency statistic. That it, the only grads that count are the ones who complete all the hoops within four years. This was eased slightly when summer school graduates were allowed inclusion in the calculation.

We are expected to run at 100% efficiency regardless of the raw material that comes our way. Is there any industry that has the same kind of standard? Most industries have some upper bound or limit for feasible efficiency. To push for higher efficiencies requires even more resources (yes, you can translate this as more money). This is a fact that politicians don’t want to admit to.

BIG NICK

June 2nd, 2010
1:45 pm

Hard to graduate when you are sitting in prison or have to care for (with my tax dollars) three kids…

An advocate for public education change & choice

June 2nd, 2010
1:47 pm

@ High School Teacher: Your comments drive home my original point. The metric reporting concerning this issue often confuses what’s happening and why its happening. This leads to people charging off creating new process and procedure to deal with a symptom(s) that isn’t necessarily the root of the problem at hand.

The question of the timing it takes a student to graduate high school and how that plays into the metric reporting is a subject that should be discussed at large. It begs the questions is it better to graduate a student with potentialy a better understanding of the material presented to them in a longer period of than considered “normal” or for them not to graduate at all or for them to graduate within the “normal” timeframe but lack the ability to grasp understand of what they have covered during the period?

Again without uniform definition and tracking of these metrics its hard to really make heads or tails of some of this stuff. Is there a big problem or little one?

The Cynical White Boy

June 2nd, 2010
1:52 pm

The classic liberal statement from the Obama-nominated and Democratic-Congress-Appointed Education Czar contains both the problem and one big cause for the problem….

…It’s OUR fault for NOT OFFERING an education..? Huh?

Last time I checked my checkbook, I am paying (out the nose) for FREE educations for all (legal and illegal, I might add). And it’s uh, MY fault they are too lazy to stay in school? It’s the already burned out teacher’s fault for not uh, engaging them?

Classic liberal thinking. Avoid any personal responsibility. God forbid that any level of the Obama-controlled-government demand any individual responsibility.

It’s OUR fault, not theirs.

Lynn

June 2nd, 2010
2:01 pm

What will happen to graduation rates in Georgia with the Math I, II, III,IV program? Many more students are failing. The class of 2012 that is the guniea pig class of this Math experiment is also the class that is now held back if one academic subject is failed. While, I don’t think a student should be promoted, keeping that same student in a 9th grade homeroom the next year who is lacking one 9th grade course may lead to higher drop out rates in the coming years.

Do we have the numbers yet on how many class of 2011 students failed Math versus the class of 2012?

john konop

June 2nd, 2010
2:18 pm

How come the DOE not be held accountable for using false numbers for graduation?

The state of Georgia does not count all the kids that left the system before 12th grade. The true number is closer to 50% drop-out rate.

In the business world the above math would be illegal to report to stock holders without FULL disclosure!

And no legitimate company I know of would report breakage of inventory that way. By what standard does Kathy Cox think this is proper? In my world we would call it fraud!

Math Specialist

June 2nd, 2010
2:22 pm

It is evident that prisons is where our officials want these kids to be. Charter schools get $3,500 per student to attend the school, but prison systems get $18,000 per inmate. Hmmm, even though I know math very well, it doesn’t take much to see that GA is paying more to keep a person locked down than keeping them educated. I tell students that they have to fight this by not doing anything that would lead them to prison, plain and simple. One good way for students to fight this is by continuing their educational endeavors.

Ashley Nicole

June 2nd, 2010
2:25 pm

What exactly is Math I, II. III. IV is it anything like 8th grade algebra ,9th grade geometry 10th grade algebra II/trigonometry 11th grade analytical geometry 12th grade calculus? these are the math courses I took in high school , {I took pre-algebra in the 7th grade} in the 70’s. Why are you assuming they will fail ? By the way guinea pigs are highly intelligent.

Angela

June 2nd, 2010
2:25 pm

@The Cynical White Boy

This problem did not start with Obama. Teachers have always be blammed for the lack of. It is a most Cynical statement to blame Obama (though I do have some major problems with the comments about teacher, school, etc.) This economy, educational systems and laws are not in this state because of Obama. Obama did not sell oil, stake and interest to other countries to place us in the state – but who did? Think back if you can honestly admit it.

So, many blame Obama based upon skin color (yes, the race card) please keep in mind Obama was not – WAS NOT reared in any African or African American environment. He is infact a true African-American based upon parents and genes. However, he was reared in Hawaii and Indonesia – now just how many Blacks are around there. His grandparents were all Caucasin in Hawaii and in Indonesia guess what not Black! So, just how Black is he really? Remember, if you know this how many Blacks placed – electorial votes (those are the ones who place him in office)!!!!!!!!!!!!

Educator for Life

June 2nd, 2010
2:31 pm

@ john konop, whay do you (and others) always refer back to the DOE and attempt to place blame on them? GA is a local control state, unlike other US States. This means that each county system has its own rules that are in place. For example, the state says that a student (special ed for example) can graduate with 3 years of math is they completed two years of math support. But, some counties say, “No, all of our students are required to take 4 years”. From a math standpoint, the state makes the standards, but the local systems can choos how to teach them and from what textbook to use. In terms of the graduation rate, do you honestly believe that the local systems report accurate information to the DOE? Stop trying to find fault with Superintendent Cox and the DOE unless the fault is appropriate, such as the governor cutting educatinal positions and money. She isn’t perfect, but a lot of you try to highlight the things wrong. Personally, I believe most of us will complain about anyone holding the position. No one is immune from criticism. If you have a problem, go to the county systems. But, be careful because I have known county systems to place the blame on the DOE just to pass the buck.

Atl1netime

June 2nd, 2010
2:31 pm

Reality-most of us do not understand other peoples realities. It is easy to sit back and criticize the families with dropouts to be either illiterate or drug-related and though that can be the case for many it is not the rule. Truth is jobs are not scarce but jobs that produce incomes in which 1 person or parent can take care of a household is. The average single mom or dad cannot take care of a single child household with only one job. If two or more jobs is needed then there is a gap with home care with the child. If this same single parent has bad credit(which is most likely) then the rates for everything cars, loans, etc. is even higher producing more payments for products that tend to need more repairs in the end spending more money. If this same parent attempts to move out of the lower income neighborhoods then he must obtain more work to pay for the increased quality of living. If you were born into a household where things maybe got tight but your parents were still able to get by then you dont know the reality of a household where everyday is a struggle just to eat. Not really my situation but I have been a football coach of jr. high athletes for going on 12 seasons and even in the well-to-do neighborhoods these everyday struggles are the truth…not movie or fairy tale.

Educator for Life

June 2nd, 2010
2:34 pm

@ Angela, why are you even wasting time responding to the cynical boy crap? Stick with posting the good information. GA has always been 49th or 50th in the US since the 90’s, when Obama wasn’t even heard of. Anything that can be said about Obama will be said.

Atl1netime

June 2nd, 2010
2:38 pm

Understanding my prior comments then maybe we can see why these teens are choosing the streets. They are often seeking employment way too young to help the household or in some circumstances themselves. They are not receiving the best parental supervision because the parents have to work so much so they are in many cases raising themselves. Now on top of all that they can choose in the state of Ga at the age of 17 not to go to school but to get a job full time or emancipate themselves and move on without the parents consent……..How can we control this…..I say as long as we have the freedoms of choice( which I fully believe in) we cant. This is just one of the hiccups in our freedoms that we have to live with.

Educator for Life

June 2nd, 2010
2:40 pm

@Ashely Nicole, Maths I-IV are exactly like those courses, but taught is a different manner. I amsure you agree that MOST, not all, teachers stood in front of class and talked the entire class. Students, not teachers, should be the focal point of learning. The new way of teaching, standards-based, requires teachers to improve the questionging in class toimprove students’ critical thinking skills. Yet, the material is still Algebra, Geometry, and Statistics. But now, in Math I for instance, 9th graders get all three strands. Math is not made up of separate parts. Algebra, Geometry, and Statistics can be integrated as one. So, our 9th graders under GPS learn more about Statistics than a 12th grader under the QCCs. I hope that helps. If you need more, i will be glad to give it.

Angela

June 2nd, 2010
2:41 pm

@Educator for Life

LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Dan

June 2nd, 2010
2:56 pm

@ Atl1Netime there is some truth to what you say, which of course is the nature of life. The opportunity to succeed is available to most your contention that these days it is harder to run a family on one income is over simplistic. That has changed little, what has changed far more is what is considered “necessary” from electronics to cloths to entertainment. These are the things that have outpaced income. If you are struggling to pay rent or mortgage and put food on your table, you don’t need cable/sattelite you should purchase all of your cloths at second hand stores or the very least discount stores, misplaced priorities are a much more cogent reason for the problem. I came from an environment with 10 people in a 4 bed 1 bath house, and in my experience if you show up for work on time you are above average, you show up and work hard you have no problem makeing the top 25%,
Sure there are some who struggle as you say through no fault of their own but that is a very low number

catlady

June 2nd, 2010
3:01 pm

lyncoln: by senior year you have already lost the ones you are going to lose–survival of the fittest.
As long as we continue to promote illiterate kids, we will have lots of dropouts. In 9th grade they have to actually start PASSING THE CLASS (whether this shows mastery or not is debatable. AreEOCTs better than the CRCT in showing mastery?)

Here is where I can support merit pay: Give me kids on grade level, let me dismiss those who want to cause trouble,give court-ordered help for those who are neglected, and I WILL be able to teach the remaining students anything on the GPS. Measure my merit on working with viable raw material. As long as we continue to send kids on year after year without mastery (as seen in those 5th graders I had last year who had not mastered 2nd grade gps), and our efforts to teach 5th grade skills will be spitting in the wind. And they will never graduate.

I feel embarrassed sending kids to middle school who can “read” 160 wpm on third grade material but cannot tell you what they have read, who cannot immediately tell you that 5 plus 6 is 11, who wait for you to tell them the answers so they can parrot them back to you. Yet, through the wonders of RF, “exposing them” to concepts in math, and scripted programs, that is just what we are doing. Why, exactly, are we surprised?

BILL LUMBERG

June 2nd, 2010
3:08 pm

its always whiteys fault

Dan

June 2nd, 2010
3:41 pm

catlady I agree with much of your post, we should indeed dimiss the trouble makers and instill that education is an opportunity not a right. However wouldn’t an exceptional teacher be able to take the below grade level kid and bring him up? Inspire him to take advantage of the opportunity presented? By the same token isn’t the ability to take kids at grade level and teach them to grade level merely satisfactory? Isn’t it more commendable for a teacher to guide a fourth grade student from a 1st grade level to third than third to fourth? Easy to impress the dinner crowd with a prime filet mignon, but it takes more skill to do so with a rump roast (pun partially intended)

oneofeach4me

June 2nd, 2010
4:05 pm

I value education. My daughter wants to be a re-constructive cosmetic surgeon. She is only 9!! She also didn’t meet the state standards in certain parts of English, Writing, and Math. I cannot afford a tutor, and we visited as many websites as the teacher suggested. Granted, my daughter has little to no patience with the subjects she isn’t interested in. But that doesn’t mean I am okay with her less than stellar performance. I just understand that, unfortunately, she has to hear something at least 4 times to get it. She is a hands on learner and zones out with auditory lessons (hence, Math and English). It really does come down to the “one size fits all”. She doesn’t learn the same or as fast as her peers. She also doesn’t disturb the class either. She just gets left behind.

One thing I can tell you. The math she was told to do in the 3rd grade I didn’t see until 5th grade and I graduated in 1995. Maybe the problem is we expect too much from children these days and expect ALL kids to be “gifted”.

drew (former teacher)

June 2nd, 2010
4:17 pm

Dan: “However wouldn’t an exceptional teacher be able to take the below grade level kid and bring him up? Inspire him to take advantage of the opportunity presented?”

Yeah, the exceptional teacher who doesn’t have another 25 or 30 students to teach, and can devote several hours a day to this “below grade level kid”, MIGHT be able to bring him up to grade level, but only if the student has a strong desire to learn and good work ethic. And how did this kid get below grade level? Sure, there are exceptions, but most of the “below grade level” kids are where they are because they have chosen to NOT do the work necessary to obtain an education. Furthermore, their parents have also chosen not to make education a priority in their child’s life.

It’s sad, but there comes a point when schools have to decide to cater to the masses (i.e., those who chose to work for their education), or neglect the masses and devote their efforts to “bringing up” the ones who have spent years as dead weight in schools.

Tony

June 2nd, 2010
4:30 pm

john konop – Georgia is not using “false” numbers. They are using the best available numbers and every kid is counted. The starting point for the calculation is ninth grade four years ago (when the current seniors started high school) and it goes from there. Dropouts from all high school grades are considered and students who do not earn a full high school diploma are counted, too. One of the sad points about articles like this one is that we are pounded over the head with data from two or more years ago. Current data in our state indicate improved graduation rates. However, that does not make for juicy headlines.

Georgia has difficulty tracking students who transfer around the state and country, but so do all the other states.

[...] New national dropout rates: 25 percent of all students; nearly 40 percent of …Atlanta Journal Constitution (blog)Indiana and New Jersey were tied for the lowest dropout rate at 1.7 percent while Louisiana had the highest event dropout rate at nearly 7.5 percent. … and more » [...]

Proud Black Man

June 2nd, 2010
4:47 pm

“Tony, Obama did not make that statement.”

It doesn’t matter to the white right now does it?

Proud Black Man

June 2nd, 2010
5:03 pm

“its always whiteys fault”

Please take the time to study the history of education in amerikkka and you will see that your response in jest is factually true.

john konop

June 2nd, 2010
5:34 pm

Educator for Life,

It nice of you to admit the STATE DOE/KATHY COX is knowingly reporting false data!

Angela

June 2nd, 2010
5:54 pm

@BILL LUMBERG

Let’s not be ignorant to facts. Remember, at one point as you say – whitey did not want any other culture or race to have an education. That my dear is a fact.

But, you cannot stop us now!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! (that is those who choose to have an education). I wonder what is your educational background.

[...] report on the number of kids who drop out of high school each year. I read over Duncan’s comments, but I was not shocked. Nor surprised. I didn’t cuss, fuss, shake my head, or throw anything. [...]

History Teacher

June 2nd, 2010
6:21 pm

I am going to give an example that sums up the problem. I had a student in United States History who had a 73 average for the year. He was very smart. However he simply did not want to do any work. His average was passing becuase he did pretty well on tests.He made a 68 on the EOCT. The person who gave him the test said he finished each section in about 10 minutes and went to sleep. After calculating his average, he was still passing by the skin of his teeth. All he needed to do was take his nine weeks exam and made a 70 on it. I gave the class a study guide, went over it with the class. All the students were prepared for the exam. He would have had no problem passing it. On the day of the exam he did not show up. My students said he wasnt going to take his nine weeks exams. I called his mother and she said she would “try” to get him to come take it. Three days of exams later, he still did not show up. I called his mother again and she said she could not make him come.(However she has not problem paying for his cell phone and paying for a car for him to drive. ) I told her that I would have three days of post planning and If he would come and take it, I would still give it to him so he would not fail the class for the year. He never bothered to come and he failed the class. Think about what’s wrong with this picture. I know that as a parent, my child would have taken that exam or he would no longer have a car or a cell phone. I am sure they both assume that I will bump up his grade so he will pass. They are going to have a rude surprise when his report card comes in the mail. There was failure but it wasnt my failure or the school’s failure. The attitude of “something for nothing” is pervasive in our schools and until we figure out how to change the attitude, we are going to continue having students on the five year plan.

Lee

June 2nd, 2010
6:49 pm

Well, well, well. It’s been almost 60 years since the ill-advised Brown vs. Board decision and here we are still talking about the black achievement gap and drop out rates. Still making excuses. Still throwing money down the drain – a measly $4 BILLION this time, but hey, it’s only taxpayer money that we are now borrowing from China.

“….transform these schools from dropout factories to college graduation academies.”

ROFLMAO on that one. Hallelujah!! Nothing but milk and honey from now on.

The bottom line is there are disparities in the IQ’s between the races and no amount of money is going to change that. You cannot expect a student with an 85 IQ to perform on the same level or achieve the same results as the student with a 110 IQ. The federal government will blow through that $4 billion and in a few years, they will still be talking about the achievement gap and dropout rates of minorities.

…. oh yeah, and they will still be blaming whitey.

pwest2986

June 2nd, 2010
6:55 pm

First, the government need to get rid of welfare.This will decrease teenager preganancies.Currenty, the teen- age mothers are rewarded with monetary, health and other benefits.This money could be used to improve the school system and pay educators more money which they deserve.
Second, if the kid drops out, make them ineligible for drivers license, and certain benefits. Simply put, the system need to do more to deter droputs. Besides that, punish the parents with monetary fines.Make it illegal to drop out of school!