AJC review: Cuts spare highest ranks of central office school staffs

The AJC examined the oft-made charge that schools are not cutting many high-salaried central office while they slash and burn their way through the teacher ranks. Turns out it’s true.

The AJC analysis found that while metro school districts have laid off  “central office staff,” most of those cuts are lower-salaried jobs, not high-paid administrators. (Many of these folks function as cabinets to the superintendents, and I think few leaders ever want to get rid of their personal posses.)

In the story, central office staffs are defended as behind-the-scenes lifelines, who help and support schools. But are these folks in “adviser” and “expert” roles any real help to teachers and students? Or do a lot of people at the top only put more pressure on the bottom?

According to the AJC analysis: (This is only an excerpt. Please, read the whole piece.)

More than 1,000 public school administrators in metro Atlanta earn more than $100,000 a year, an Atlanta Journal-Constitution review of school salary data shows.

The review shows that Atlanta Public Schools, the smallest of metro Atlanta’s major school districts, has the highest administrative costs. Cobb County, while having the second-largest student population in the state, has one of the smallest central-office staffs and some of the lowest costs. DeKalb schools have more people making $100,000-plus a year than any district.

The AJC analysis comes as metro school districts are laying off more than 1,500 teachers, increasing class sizes and cutting budgets by tens of millions of dollars. While districts say they are also cutting “central office staff,” most of those cuts are lower-salaried jobs, not high-paid administrators.

Stuart Bennett, executive director of the Georgia Association of Educational Leaders, says central office pay is not out of line.

“I don’t think they’ve just pulled these salaries out of thin air,” he said. “A lot of districts have done salary studies with private industry. It looks like a lot of people are making those salaries, but we have a couple of districts whose budgets are around a billion dollars.”

On average in Georgia, the central office accounts for 5 percent of a district’s operating budget. In metro Atlanta, that average increases to 6 percent. But Atlanta Public Schools spends nearly 10 percent of its budget on administration.

The difference is even more pronounced by another measure: spending on central office per student. The metro average is $550 per student. Atlanta spends $1,392 per student.

APS spokesman Keith Bromery said accounting practices explain why the APS administrative costs appear higher.

“The differences in central office costs between APS and other local school districts reflect APS’ financial management practices that allocate costs where they are managed rather than where they occur,” he said in an e-mail to the AJC.

Central office cuts

This is a brief sketch of plans to cut central offices in selected metro school districts:

Fulton County: Fulton County schools, with 440 central office jobs, will cut 53 vacant positions and 10 that are staffed. Fulton is also eliminating three higher-ranking, $100K positions, such as an assistant superintendent for instructional services, a chief leadership development officer and a director, spokeswoman Allison Toller said. All of the cuts will total about $3.7 million.

Gwinnett County: With 489 central office positions costing $35.5 million, Gwinnett says it will freeze hiring for central office positions, except critical need, saving $8.5 million.

Clayton County: With 494 jobs in the central office, Clayton plans to cut three cabinet-level posts, three directors, one assistant director and 10 coordinators, all of which are higher-ranking jobs. It also plans to cut about 35 lower-ranking central office jobs, such as administrative assistants, for a savings of $5.3 million, district spokesman Charles White said.

Cobb County: Cobb plans to cut 45 of its 360 central office positions. It did not list the jobs except to say that it has eliminated an associate superintendent position. It’s cutting another 23 slots, but they are positions such as custodians, bus drivers and mechanics, according to an e-mail from the system’s chief financial officer. The cuts are projected to save about $4.9 million.

88 comments Add your comment

Joy In Teaching

May 23rd, 2010
9:11 am

In my experience, if teachers ever see these people at all, it is bad news. In my county (a small one), it is the running joke if we ever see any of those instructional lead teachers, we’ll be told that we aren’t “Learning Focusy” enough and receive an NI on an evaluation. I have no idea what they do other than occasionally observe a class. Neither do students or parents.

Northview (Ex)Teacher

May 23rd, 2010
9:15 am

Is anyone at all surprised by this? As you read the article, note that each county has a (well-paid) spokesperson spewing forth the spin from the Board and Superintendent. Every teacher is expendable, and every central office employee is essential. This is especially true of these PR types, who add nothing to the education of students and detract considerably from the ability citizens have to trust anything the school system does or says. All PR people should be fired immediately.

Parents, would you rather that your tax dollars go to support PR leeches, or people who actually do something, like teach your kids?

Honestly, I’ve just gotten so sick of all of this. A school system is not a business; a school system is (in Georgia, “should be”) a school system.

doh

May 23rd, 2010
9:16 am

UH……..DUH

I needed an article in the newspaper to tell me this?

concerned DCSS parent

May 23rd, 2010
9:16 am

My problem isn’t just the size of DeKalb’s central office, but the salaries of and lack of competence of many of these central office employees. While only one member of the current board has children employed by DCSS (and I don’t think those children are in the central office), many former board members and high level central office employees have children and other relatives making way to much $$$. They aren’t competent and even if they were, the salaries for their positions are out of line with reality.

concerned DCSS parent

May 23rd, 2010
9:18 am

stuck in the filter?

V for Vendetta

May 23rd, 2010
9:18 am

I agree with Joy in Teaching. We rarely see our central office staff, and, if we do, it is usually to herald something about which we would rather not know. Some of them are “failed” principals and administrators, meaning they couldn’t hack it at those positions and were moved up to save face.

(It would be interesting, Maureen, to see if statistics are available for such movements. I know of more than a few in my own county.)

The central office is, in most cases, a big joke. Their jobs are nebulous at best. But those on the front lines will continue to suffer.

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td

May 23rd, 2010
9:25 am

If you are not in the classroom instructing students then you are expendable. This should be the only statement coming out of these county offices. This includes all the assistant, associate principals in the schools. Why do elementary schools need three of four administrators?

Maureen Downey

May 23rd, 2010
9:30 am

@V, Not sure how you would distinguish the principals moved up because they were competent and those who were moved because they couldn’t do the job. I doubt their personnel files would tell that story. In my own system, we just had a very strong principal moved into a central office job because he wanted the change.
Maureen

DunMoody

May 23rd, 2010
9:31 am

The central office mindset is centralized control. The reason there are so many “instructional coaches,” “area superintendents,” and legions of assistants is that school system bureaucracies live to continue their own existance. In a school system, that means they are panicked by the thought that schools might make management choices that are good for their students and teachers but contrary to the one-size-fits-all central office standard – and mean that far fewer “managers” are needed to run the show. And, of course, the cost of such bureaucracy is huge. Every time I attend a meeting with the bureaucrats, there is one person who makes the decision and a host of others who sit around nodding or shaking their heads in agreement.

thrashfanmax

May 23rd, 2010
9:44 am

Do not let the tone of the article fool you. Cobb County has a bloated central office as well, not to mention an unscrupulous Super who takes 6 figure pay raises while sacrificing teachers. What does Gwinnett County know that everyone else does not? Privatize non-essential student service such as bus service and food service with a caveat that they hire the existing personnel to do the jobs they do already….duh….the ignorance that is rampant in bureaucracy is amazing. If you do not think these things are safer, healthier, and work simply search them on Google…lots of money saved and improvements made!

Fericita

May 23rd, 2010
9:47 am

Some of the instructional coaches are helpful in training teachers on newly adopted textbooks, curriculum, etc. But, as we get more furlough days and less in-service days in which to have those trainings, their job becomes a bit more irrelevant. Good teachers don’t wait for a coach to tell them how to use a new textbook; they figure it out on their own anyway.

The Cynical White Boy

May 23rd, 2010
9:49 am

Give Clayton County time. It’s well on it’s merry way to becoming a dysfunctional political machine that will make Atlanta government look efficient by comparison.

I’m sure the Clayton County “in crowd” read with absolute horror that another school district (Dekalb) had more 6-figure salaries than they did. Look out Clayton County taxpayers, (what there are of you).

ScienceTeacher671

May 23rd, 2010
9:53 am

In our smaller mid-sized county, most of the central office people don’t show up in the schools, but we have assistant superintendents, deputy superintendent, directors, etc. Most of the departments have more than one secretary, some of whom make more than beginning teachers (and a couple making more than many experienced teachers.) We have executive directors who also have directors and assistant directors reporting to them.

We’ve had a couple of training sessions this year where central office departments sent 3-5 people from their department to read a powerpoint to the teachers for an hour. They split the powerpoint up and had one person read one section, another person read the next, etc. It was rather like watching students present a “group project”. We could only assume that they were trying to justify each job.

We also have several academic coach types who are out in the schools “helping” teachers. Oddly enough, some aren’t even qualified to teach the subjects they are “coaching”. There are curriculum coordinators at each school, and there are several curriculum coordinators at the central office. No one is sure what most of them do.

From the point of view of the teachers, there is plenty of fat to be cut at the administrative level. The district seems more inclined to cut classroom teachers and classroom supplies, however.

ScienceTeacher671

May 23rd, 2010
9:57 am

@thrashfanmax, Chatham County has contracted out its bus service, but from reading the reports and complaints in the newspaper, I’m not convinced that it’s safer, cheaper, or more efficient.

Northview (Ex)Teacher

May 23rd, 2010
9:57 am

Agree with most of the posters. One area that could be cut immediately is professional development. I cannot ever remember a single one of their sessions that was even remotely useful. Teachers would be better off taking college courses than listening to that drivel.

Agree also that central office is never useful or helpful in any way. It’s all about control. I never saw the Area Superintendent (Nagler) unless she was hassling a teacher on behalf of the loathsome and despicable Ashley Widener. What does she do for $175K? Anyone know?

How about counselors? Why are they paid more than teachers for a much easier job (those at Northview know how to make it a VERY easy job, BTW)? Anyone know what they do?

JD

May 23rd, 2010
9:58 am

Teachers, paraprofessionals, and other underlings in the school system have known this for years. Too bad others are now figuring this out.

HStchr

May 23rd, 2010
9:58 am

“A lot of districts have done salary studies with private industry…” Have they done salary studies with private industry for teachers, custodians, or paraprofessionals? (totally rhetorical question)

In my system, we have ONE curriculum coordinator who does her job well. I came here from a system that had three coordinators for each subject, and they were known to often be less than competent administrators moved to the county office to mitigate damage at the school level. I’m thankful to be in a district that doesn’t have the money or size to get so out of balance. However, coaching supplements haven’t been cut- and that’s paid entirely out of local funds. There’s our imbalance.

ABC

May 23rd, 2010
10:01 am

Geez, what a surprise.

what can be done

May 23rd, 2010
10:03 am

one example would be B Hall, if you cut her pay in half, she still makes in excess of $150,000 a year. You could employ 3 classroom teachers with that.

Concerned

May 23rd, 2010
10:08 am

There are many valuable positions at the central office in FCS, but so many more layers that need elimination because they do not truly support the local schools. Yes, we need someone to select textbooks, yes we need a payroll dept., yes we need technology. But what about HR? Why do we need HR AND Application Processing? Starting with the HR dept. where the director of HR has a vested interest in keeping the “graduation coaches” in schools because his wife is one. Also, the criteria that was utilized for RIF-ing personnel was subjective at best. How is it that a first year teacher who happened to teach in special education this school year, received a contract, or a first year band teacher at the middle or high school received a contract, but teachers who returned from a medical/maternity leave, with 15 years of experience were “reassigned” to Pre-K positions at other schools, with the salaries lowered to the state salary schedule? Does Dr. Loe truly know what is going on in her HR dept? Does she know how the director makes decisions that are not in the best interest of the local school? Principals know what they need to make their schools successful. The HR dept. “hand-cuffs” principals and prevents them from making crucial personnel decisions that work for their particular school. Why did the two Area Superintendents that retired this year have to be replaced? Each of them made a minimum of $150,000. How many teachers could have been spared with that amount of money? All data and research has proven that smaller class sizes are most beneficial to the students. So . . . has the data now changed? Will children learn better with more students in the classroom? What about at the middle and high schools where teachers were let go according to the subject area they taught? Will your child be successful being taught Science by someone who doesn’t have that certification? Will those schools be able to even offer students all of the classes they truly need to be successful in college? I fear the central office has forgotten why we are in the business we are in. The children are supposed to be first and foremost. Unfortunately, in FCS and other districts in metro ATL, they are not. It’s very sad.

Dekalbite

May 23rd, 2010
10:08 am

2 concerned DCSS parent

“While only one member of the current board has children employed by DCSS (and I don’t think those children are in the central office), ”

I believe both Zepora Roberts and Sarah Copelin-Woods have relatives employed by DCSS. I don’t believe any are teachers.

Echo

May 23rd, 2010
10:14 am

Teachers (and some others) have been saying this for years. So the AJC does an “investigation” BFD…it isn’t like anything will be done about this. The board office will protect its own and teachers will still lose their jobs.

John Trotter vindicated once again

May 23rd, 2010
10:19 am

While PAGE and GAE were twiddling their thumbs and reigning accolades on some of the last people on Earth who deserve them, Dr. John Trotter was telling the truth.

Light years ahead of the other organizations when it came to cheating.

Light years ahead when it came to the corruption that permeates DeKalb County schools.

Light years ahead of the other organizations when it comes to the systemic disregard for teachers, and the blatant abuse of their legal rights.

Light years ahead when it comes to top heavy administration that destroys budgets and hamstrings teachers with paperwork whose main objective is to justify the top heavy administration.

Time to give credit where credit is due.

M George

May 23rd, 2010
10:30 am

I’ve written this before but no one seems to care. Okay, with the salaries for central office people in Fulton. But what is their real salary. How do you know how much is salary and how much is for gasoline and use of their cars? Is it an additional $100? $200? $300? $400 $500? or $800 per month? Do all Fulton employees get these monthly perks in their salaries or do they get paid by the mileage they travel. Might not add up to keeping teachers on the payroll but it sure makes no sense for them to have these perks. No money in Fulton? Most be for some.

M George

May 23rd, 2010
10:41 am

To Concerned:

Surely Loe knows what is going on. She gets paid enough to know. Principals are too scared to talk . Loe and others get back at people if they talk.

Northview (Ex)Teacher

May 23rd, 2010
10:54 am

Good points all about FCS. Perhaps the saddest thing is the lack of vision that has marked the system for years. When times were good, they didn’t plan ahead: tax cut, tax cut, tax cut. Now that times are not good, they don’t know how to prioritize.

Imagine what a visionary leader could accomplish in such times. Instead, we have Loe, who is sort of an empty (but rather large) suit. She has no vision, no ideas, no morals, no anything, except an understanding that the Board wants to do nothing. She is willing to cut everything mercilessly, so long as she can take home her fat (I didn’t call her fat!) paycheck. Scr*w you, Cindy Loe!

Cut music? Sure! Cut social workers? Sure! Cut teachers? Sure! Cut PR and other useless central office types? Never!

I’ve been thinking for quite some time that nothing would change until parents felt the cuts. I think that’s why Katie and Ashley were so intent on dumping on teachers as much as possible. After all, three teachers are not worth as much as one spokesperson who can explain why we’re dumping teachers in a school system, while maintaining central office staff that contribute nothing at all to education.

Stop abusing teachers and children

May 23rd, 2010
10:55 am

In theory you can be really committed to quality education, yet legitimately claim to be concerned about education spending.

There is more than enough administrative bloat to make those two positions not incompatible.

But, if that’s what the Legislature is arguing, why didn’t the Legislature mandate that every school system post online, in a format the voters can easily navigate, the position, salary, and duties of each staff member of a school system, along with an explanation of how they directly benefit the classroom student.

Mandate that it stay online at least two full weeks before the local school board votes on job cuts; then the voters have a way of holding the school systems accountable for what positions they chose to cut.

Of course they may choose to stay at home and watch American Idol, but at least you gave them a fighting chance to participate.

The Librarian

May 23rd, 2010
10:57 am

Six years ago a lunchroom worker stood up in front of her church and cried because her husband’s business had failed and she was in danger of losing her BMW. The superintendent at the time came down out of the choir loft and, in front of the church, offered her a clerical position in the finance department at the central office. She has no education beyond high school, yet she makes $63,000 while I, with a master’s degree and 14 years’ experience, make $52,000. When folks at the central office were questioned, they claimed she was a CPA. This is simply not true.

@td, I don’t know if you meant to include the school librarians in your statement or not. I am no longer in the classroom teaching on a daily basis, but my job is an integral part of student learning. I research and select books and computer databases based on our curriculum as well as books for pleasure reading that will egage our readers as well as enhance their education. I locate professional resources for our teachers and am available to collaborate with them on lesson plans. Over the course of each school year, I do teach formal classes on using reference resources, information literacy and research skills, and our kids are coming to us from elementary school without the ability to use programs such as Word and PowerPoint, so I will probably start teaching them the basics of these next year. A lot of people, including legislators, principals and even some teachers, think that all we do is check books in and out and that a parapro or parent volunteer could do the job, but that is just not true.

Sorry for the rant. This was not meant as an attack on td, I just don’t want people to think that because we are not all in the classroom all the time we are expendable.

Dekalbite

May 23rd, 2010
11:09 am

I question the AJC figures. I know you guys got them off of the state Salary and Travel audit report, but our titles in DCSS may be different than the state titles so unless you know what these employee functions are, where they actually work, and what their classification is, it’s difficult to decipher.

Here are some departments below that you may want to look at. There are many other employees besides all those $100,000+ managers, directors, assistant directors, assistant superintendents, associate superintendents, Deputy Superintendents, etc. that no doubt were in your calculations.

$9,000,000:
Did you include benefits – estimated at 20% to 25% in DCSS?
That figure alone would have bumped up the DCSS $49,000,000 AJC calculation to $58,000,000 (using the more modest 20% in benefits). $9,000,000 more spent in benefit money would buy an awful lot of teachers.

$18,000,000:
Did you consider MIS (Information Systems)? This department of 290 employees consumes $15,000,000 in salary and with 20% benefits $18,000,000. Many of the titles are “hidden” in the state Salary and Travel spreadsheet. Here are the personnel titles you should have considered that fall under the MIS budget:
Technology Specialist, IS Personnel -Transportation, IS Personnel – Support Services, IS Personnel – Other Support, IS Personnel – Miantenance, IS Personnel – Instructional Serv, Information Services Clerk, Information Services Personnel

$7,000,000:
Did you know that the “Instructional Supervisors” are Central Office personnel (often listed as coordinators)? There are 62 of these employees who cost DCSS almost $6,000,000. With 20% benefits, they cost DCSS over $7,000,000.
Here are just a few of the titles of DCSS Instructional Supervisors:
Magnet and Theme School, Gifted Coordinator, Title 1 Coordinator, Assistant Director Health and Wellness, Assessment and Accountability Coordinators, Educational Media Director, Elementary English/Language Arts and Social Studies Coordinator (2 of them for this job), Middle School Math Coordinator for Middle Schools, Content Coordinator for Reading First, Content Coordinator for Science (Elementary), Content Coordinator for Science, etc.

$7,000,000:
How about the “Staff Development Specialists” on the audit spreadsheet? Did you know they are our Instructional Coaches who “train” teachers (never teach a child). There are 80 of them and they account for over $6,000,000 in salary. With 20% benefits this figure comes to over $7,000,000.

$5,000,000
Graduation and Literacy Coaches:
$4,000,000 in salary and $5,000,000 with benefits for 60 employees.

$12,000,000:
Did you consider the Security Personnel/Security for DCSS as Central office employees? DCSS has 218 Security employees at a cost of close to $10,000,000 in salary and with benefits $12,000,000. (As a basis for comparison, Gwinnett County Schools with 156,000+ students to our almost 97,000 students has 49 Security Personnel/Security at around $2,000,000 in salary and benefits).

$4,000,000:
How about Human Resources? I went to the DCSS website and downloaded their .pdf document that list every HR employee and their titles. Then I used the state Salary and Travel audit to make a spreadsheet that listed every name and salary using Autosum function to calculate their salaries. They have 60 employees and salaries of $3,500,000. With benefits this comes to over $4,000,000?

$5,000,000:
Did you consider Fernbank Science Center? Ms. Tyson certainly considers Fernbank Science Center personnel as Central Office employees. She recently let go of 2 employees as part of those 150 Central office employees (one was a teacher and one was administrator) the AJC listed. Most of the Fernbank Science Center personnel are listed as “Other Instructional Provider”. Fernbank Science Center personnel (29 teachers and 36 admin and support personnel) cost around $4,000,000 in salaries and almost $5,000,000 with benefits.

$4,000,000:
Family Service Center employees cost $3,500,000. With benefits this figure soars over $4,000,000. This department is a favorite place to “park” BOE and former BOe members’ relatives.

$6,000,000:
Did you consider the “Miscellaneous” category that DCSS placed many employees in. If you look what these employees do, you will find many Central Office employees. DCSS has over $6,000,000 in salaries that are marked “Miscellaneous”. A far greater number of our personnel are dumped into this “Miscellaneous” category.

Love to teach

May 23rd, 2010
11:10 am

In reading the article I noticed Ms. Talley from Dekalb County school system describing all that her office does. While I can’t possibly know if her office actually accomplishes their job description, there is one job mentioned that her office should not do. According to the article Ms. Talley included “writing the curriculum” as part of the job of her office. I thought the state GPS was the curriculum?

Edgeucator

May 23rd, 2010
11:13 am

Central offices have been the great palaces of money squandering and labor refuse for far too long. If you’re trying to find out where a lackluster administrator was trainsferred, always check here first. You’ll find offices full of the educational elite playing pacman on their county provided top of the line computer.

Angry Mom

May 23rd, 2010
11:14 am

We just said goodbye to seven of our best teachers at our DeKalb elementary school as they retired at the end of this school year. Most of them would have preferred to keep teaching awhile longer, but because of the effects on their pensions of decisions made by the school board and administration, it makes more financial sense to retire now before their retirement salaries take another hit. A teacher’s retirement benefit is based on the most recent years salary. Taking all of these furlough days cuts significantly into that salary.

I am both saddened and angry when I think how much our up-and-coming students are going to miss out by not having these wonderful, dedicated teachers. And then I think how negligible the impact of losing a bunch of administrators would be to students.

Clearly, the DeKalb school board and administration do not have the best interests of the students as their top priority.

it's time

May 23rd, 2010
11:17 am

what’s interesting is that most of the positions that Fulton County claimed to cut in their central office were vacant anyway . . . they were unfulfilled positions. So when they trumpet about making cuts, they were already making do . . . and, for the record – one of the central offices’ pr mouthpieces said “we train new teachers” – um, what school system has new teachers? who’s hiring to need to provide training to THAT many new teachers? seems kind of silly when we’re laying off teachers right and left, correct?

ScienceTeacher671

May 23rd, 2010
11:39 am

And oddly enough, there are still jobs listed on the TeachGeorgia site…some counties apparently are hiring in the double digits!

Mike

May 23rd, 2010
11:46 am

@ M George

Loe learned from the best. Principals and teachers have been afraid to speak out in Gwinnett County for many years because of Wilbanks and his staff which Loe was a part of for many years.

M George

May 23rd, 2010
11:48 am

Northview….

You are right. Finally the board has a superintendent they can control. Vision and morals not needed.

catlady

May 23rd, 2010
11:55 am

I repeat my suggestion of last night: one administrator (person who does not directly contact students every day in a teaching role) per 145 TEACHERS. Elementary teachers teach about 140 segments per day. High school teachers see probably more. We need “boots on the ground”, not paperpushers who merely add to the workload of teachers.

HStchr

May 23rd, 2010
12:44 pm

catlady- we have ONE curriculum coordinator, who does all that needs doing at the count level for approximately 3500 students. If she can do the job, sounds like a lot of bloated counties need to seriously think about their numbers. My school has 4 administrators for 1000+/- students. And we only had 3 until a few years ago. It’s amazing to me how many chiefs it takes to tell the indians what to do. I left metro ATL seven years ago, and even with the paycut I took then, I haven’t looked back!

FulCo teacher/parent

May 23rd, 2010
12:53 pm

To Fulton posters and Librarian: Yes, parents will feel it this year, and they will learn there was much more to the FCS cuts than losing 4th/5th band/orchestra, which got the majority of the press. The 1000 positions eliminated do not include positions cut by principals when their “discretionary” funds were decreased for 2010/11. The counseling department for a high school with 2400 students will have one support person next year with fewer counselors – (but they kept the grad coach, as someone else noted.) There will be one media specialist and one media parapro for the 2400 students, the same staffing as for a middle school with 700 students. Teachers may have 35 students in their core classes and 80 in chorus/band/etc. BUT our property taxes were rolled back for many years and we’re still below many systems with the 1 mill increase this year…save that $200 and ravage your child’s quality public education!

bootney farnsworth

May 23rd, 2010
12:53 pm

please don’t tell me anyone’s suprised by this.

Proud Black Man

May 23rd, 2010
12:54 pm

Along with my timely analysis on race I have said time and time again that this is all part of the republican agenda to wreck public education. PUBLIC SCHOOL teachers you are being thrown under the bus and until you realize that and act accordingly this ajc get schooled pity party will keep going on and on.

bootney farnsworth

May 23rd, 2010
1:01 pm

the simple fact is the system exists for one reason
self perpetation

bootney farnsworth

May 23rd, 2010
1:06 pm

Atlanta public schools and DeKalb public schools are just
overrun with Republicans.

bootney farnsworth

May 23rd, 2010
1:11 pm

@ Maureen,

you’re right about one thing: the admin types have a mine’s bigger
mentality concerning personal staff, sycophants, and retainers.

the more flunkys at your command, the more impressive their titles,
the more self important you are in your eyes and in the eyes of others.

Infuriated

May 23rd, 2010
1:12 pm

Why do you people keep allowing this!!!! I am only one person but I have screamed for years that school administrators DO NOT NEED TO BE PAID 100 GRAND to sit and pick their nose!!!!! That’s all I hear, “It’s for the children, It’s for the schools, It’s for education” SCREW THAT, it’s for their pockets!!!!!!!!!

bootney farnsworth

May 23rd, 2010
1:17 pm

@ Maureen & V

something which happens alot is the moving of connected but otherwise
incompetent, ineffective, or abusive management types to well paying
but otherwise undefined administrative positions in the main offices.

gets them out of the way without having to deal with the consequences of their actions.

in short, Georgia has institutionalized the Peter Principal

bootney farnsworth

May 23rd, 2010
1:18 pm

@ infuriated

exactly how are we allowing this to happen?

anon

May 23rd, 2010
1:21 pm

I’m just going to sit back and watch GA education go to dead last, while it self destructs. The kids will be uneducated. The teachers will take enough to explode.
I was in a “central office” position in DCSS that paid 34k/yr, doing the work of TWO of my title. I was salary, but I was not allowed to come in or stay late. I found this out after trying to stay late and get work done, and I got thrown out.
After neither of my supervisors or one of their supervisors couldn’t help, I asked the superintendent. I didn’t want overtime. I just wanted to be allowed to work the extra time to be able to finish everything. As a result, the only thanks I got was getting chewed out and a negative review. I will NEVER go back to work for any school system.
The incompetence and greed are too much to take.

anon

May 23rd, 2010
1:23 pm

exactly how are we allowing this to happen?

by not going on strike
and don’t give me the “it’s illegal” bit. I know that. But it will be the only thing that turns it all around. Period. No amount of articles, tv news stories, or anything will amount to a hill of beans.