Survey: Drugs and lack of respect for teachers pose greater school problems than bullying

In light of all the attention to bullying after the suicide of Massachusetts high school freshman Phoebe Prince, a new survey found nearly three-quarters of Americans consider bullying and harassment a serious problem in their local public schools. Respondents, however, said illegal drugs and lack of respect for teachers were a greater problem, according to the survey by Public Agenda.

According to the study:

More than one-third of Americans (35 percent), including 39 percent of parents, say they were bullied themselves when growing up. But only 8 percent of the public and 10 percent of parents say they were bullied “a lot.” These findings are based on a Public Agenda survey of 1,001 people, including 262 parents of children under 18, conducted from April 8 – 11, 2010

Public Agenda found that 74 percent of those surveyed say bullying and harassment are serious problems in their local schools, with 47 percent calling these actions “very serious” problems. Roughly three-quarters (76 percent) of the public say illegal drugs and students treating teachers with a lack of respect are serious problems, with 53 percent calling illegal drugs and 50 percent saying disrespect for teachers was “very serious.”

Parents are actually slightly less concerned about these problems than the public overall. Sixty-nine percent of parents say bullying is a serious problem (40 percent say “very serious”), seventy percent say disrespect for teachers is a serious problem (45 percent say “very serious”), and 68 percent say illegal drugs are a serious problem (39 percent say “very serious”).

Physical fighting and cheating in schools are lesser concerns for both the total public (59 percent and 55 percent, respectively) and parents (55 percent for fighting, 48 percent for cheating).

Adults who say they were bullied in school are more likely to say bullying is a “very serious” problem (49 percent versus 42 percent of those who said they weren’t bullied). Men are more likely to say they were bullied (41 percent compared with 30 percent of women), but women are more likely to consider bullying a “very serious” problem (53 percent of women compared with 41 percent of men).

110 comments Add your comment

[...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by MSA of Snellville and Maureen Downey, Mark Davids. Mark Davids said: Survey: Drugs and lack of respect for teachers pose greater school problems …: In light of all the attention to … http://bit.ly/aPmMMh [...]

JW

April 29th, 2010
6:00 am

“Roughly three-quarters (76 percent) of the public say illegal drugs and students treating teachers with a lack of respect are serious problems…50 percent saying disrespect for teachers was “very serious.”

Students must be learning about lack of respect for teachers by watching and listening to Georgia politicians. Way to lead by example!

JOS

April 29th, 2010
6:38 am

My wife is a teacher – good teachers don’t fear merit pay – in fact most would welcome it as a way to distinquish their work from the poor teachers . Poor teachers protected by the teachers unions for years, are the ones who resist. Teachers unions don’t care about education or children – they care about protecting the jobs of their members – no matter how bad a teacher they are. Just look at the “rubber rooms” in New York City for a prime example of the goals of teacher unions.
Declining respect for teachers by students is mostly a reflection of their parents feelings. When a student is disciplined and mommy/daddy rushes to defend their poor darling “who never does anything wrong”, what example does that set for a student?

catlady

April 29th, 2010
6:58 am

Lack of respect for teachers IS a form of attempted bullying.

teacher 2

April 29th, 2010
7:00 am

what does this have to do with merit pay or unions? nothing.

Kids are a direct reflection of society in general. The breakdown of the family unit leads to a disrespect of all adults, not just teachers. Many of them have been abandoned by birth parents and raised either relunctantly in single parent homes or other relatives pick up the slack.

What a sad view of the world some them display. Just go to your nearest high school and check out the teenage pregnancy rates. Pregnant with little education and birth fathers who are incapable and too inept to provide any support. The cycle continues and the working taxpayer picks up the check.

And we are shocked when students produced by this class of people do not know how to conduct themselves in a public setting?

Teaching in FL is worse

April 29th, 2010
7:06 am

Teacher 2-well said. Kids learn from those around them. Just watch any of the reality tv junk that is on, and see what our kids are watching. Wretched.

Isn’t it a form of neglect/lack of respect when you send a child to the office for discipline and they send them back?

Teaching in FL is worse

April 29th, 2010
7:06 am

filter 7:06…..pleeze

ABS

April 29th, 2010
7:10 am

Teachers who work in a school where the average family income is $100,000+ have nothing to fear from merit pay. Their students will do all the work for them! Teachers who bust their tails every day in low socio-economic neighborhoods are the ones who are frustrated with the merit pay notion. We work hard to educate our students AND make them feel safe and confident in their own abilities. There is ALWAYS progress… just not as much as legislators think they should see.

Keep in mind these decisions are being made by people who have NEVER been a classroom teacher OR bothered to step foot into our schools.

williev

April 29th, 2010
7:17 am

@ teacher 2 – I think JOS is intimating or suggesting a correlation between good teachers – merit pay and disrespect for teachers. What I’m reading into the comments is that students don’t show disrespect when there is good teaching going on in the classroom. I agree. In classrooms where quality instruction is happening, most students are behaving appropriately.

williev

April 29th, 2010
7:21 am

@ABS – sorry you’re wrong about teachers that work in schools where the average family income is $100,00+. . . Merit pay will be about PROGRESS!!! Students that already are at the top will have more difficulty showing that they are making progress. Teachers need to do their research. If I have an average student that is low performing, as I good teacher I should be able to make great progress with them.

williev

April 29th, 2010
7:25 am

@ABS – If a student is already scoring at the 99th percentile in everything, where do they go? You can be the worst teacher in the world and this student is still going to score in the 99th percentile. Have you heard of Test ID in Georgia? You are already set-up to keep up with progress students make from year to year!!!

The Cynical White Boy

April 29th, 2010
7:43 am

I agree with “teacher 2″ – school classrooms are only one manifestation of society in general. You need go no further than your nearest Wal-Mart or restaurant to see children acting like animals while clueless parents (or guardians or whoever it is) chat away on their cell phones and ignore the behavior.

Why should we expect the brats to act any different in a classroom?

Since I pay (through the nose) for public schools, I tried them, then placed mine into private schools. Today’s private school is simply what my public school was – the parents care, the teachers are respected, and problem kids are thrown out.

Thank God mine are almost through private school, ’cause I am quite sure Obama will take over private schools, too – and then the precious children will have all kinds of “rights” to prevent any discipline from happening at all.

RADLY

April 29th, 2010
7:45 am

The fact that the parents aren’t too concerned with their children’s behavior speaks volumes about why kids behave as they do. Families are so busy trying to make ends meet…they are neglecting to properly raise them. There is no excuse for this kind of neglect…you brought them into the world! So many parents view the schools as their DAY CARE CENTER…expect this and that to be given…drop them to schools at 7:00 in the morning….do not attend meetings or involve themselves in a positive manner regarding their children’s education….but when they get into trouble or earn a poor grade they’re up in arms blaming teachers/schools etc. All of this is a very sad commentary on our sick society.

RADLY

Rick

April 29th, 2010
7:45 am

JOS Don’t know where you are coming from I have been a teacher for 27 years and I don’t have a teacher union.

kohlberg stage 3

April 29th, 2010
7:52 am

@JOS …and good teachers get the toughest behavior and academic cases…and are expected to work miracles. (Which we sometimes do) I KNOW I am a good teacher, but I still fear merit pay.

It’s a form of respect when your administration gives you problmes they think only you can handle, but that doesn’t mean merit pay makes it any easier.

Concerned Educator

April 29th, 2010
7:59 am

For all of those that say yes to merit pay, find a study that shows that merit pay has worked. Then you can shut us all up. A lot of individuals live in their own little world and don’t realize that issues that are taking place with the rest of society. Example: There’s a huge difference between North Fulton and South Fulton. When you have area superintendents retire or resign because their new assignment has them serving schools in North and South Fulton, that’s a problem. Guess which area superintendents resigned or retired. It wasn’t those that are south of downtown. Until you walk a mile in another person’s shoes, you will never realize or understand why some fight against atrocities.

2 Kid Parent

April 29th, 2010
8:00 am

Many good points….. a good percentage of kids today are a reflection of what’s wrong with society in general. Superficial, spoiled, no self-respect, let alone respect for others, and just a enormous amount of “entitlement” that is definitely unwarranted.

We need to stop this “everybody wins” entitlement, go back to disciplining children when and where appropriate without fear of someone else’s opinion, and call out parents when they show no interest or concern of how their “precious little one” negatively impacts progress in the classroom. Most of all,..do away with “No Child Left Behind”…. if kids don’t cut it, they stay behind until they do.

Morrus

April 29th, 2010
8:06 am

Vote out the incumbents and start over

Spexis

April 29th, 2010
8:09 am

The majority of these comments have nothing to do with “Drugs and lack of respect for teachers pose greater school problems than bullying”
Not about unions or merit pay.
Drugs, lack of respect for teachers and bullying standards(discipline) are set and controlled by the admninistration. IHS just doesn’t cut it!

V for Vendetta

April 29th, 2010
8:14 am

How did this discussion turn to merit pay, unions, and society?

In any case, there are myriad reasons for children’s misbehavior in the classroom, but I don’t think that’s the biggest problem in terms of how it impacts the education of others. Though it is more widespread than it was when I was in school, it is the expectations, consequences and repercussions that need to be changed. There will ALWAYS be bad kids–sometimes more, sometimes fewer than there are now. But as long as those kids get an ever increasing number of chances, opportunities, and alternative solutions, the situation will only get worse.

There was a time when a constantly disruptive child was removed from the classroom because the public schools were more concerned with the impact he or she was having on the education of the rest of the class. Now the schools are so concerned with the individual troublemaker’s “rights” that they allow them to continually negatively affect the education of the class.

Strong, consistent, and unwavering discipline will solve the problem. You can’t change the parents, but you CAN change the schools. Toughen up, and the problem will be solved.

Teaching is worse in FL

April 29th, 2010
8:57 am

@V All of these things impact our potential to earn merit pay.

I agree with the discipline part, but schools that toughen up better be ready for:

A. Negative press (”you’re being racist”)
B. Lawsuits

Batgirl

April 29th, 2010
9:07 am

@williev, when I was in the classroom, I provided good instruction, and, yes, most of my students were well behaved, but it only takes one or two to disrupt the whole class. I was also on a team that got most of the “good” kids, so our scores were usually somewhat higher than the other team, although we also enforced discipline more than the other team. JOS, I’m willing to bet that your wife also gets the “good” kids.

Now on to the topic at hand. I don’t see drugs as a major problem in my school. Through the years we have occasionally caught kids with Tylenol, cigarettes, alcohol and pot. Note that I said occasionally through the years. It’s not like there is a cloud of smoke coming out of the bathrooms or anyone is staggering down the halls.

As for true, abusive bullying, I don’t know. I’m sure it’s happening somewhere, but it is usually out of view/earshot of teachers. As I’ve said before on this forum, much of what I have seen has been a two-way street with kids going back and forth with each other until it goes too far and one goes home and complains to Mama.

Disrespect for teachers. I see kids who look teachers straight in the eye and lie through their teeth. I also see kids who totally ignore teachers who are talking to them. I think this comes from homes where the adults talk all the time and say nothing of value, so the kids just learn to tune everyone out. I also see kids who use minor disabilities and eccentricities as excuses for bad behavior. I also see administrators who don’t back up their teachers when they try to enforce discipline. I also see a lot of good kids who would die before they would be disrespectful of anyone, classmate, parent or teacher.

I have to go proctor the CRCT now. Ciao!

Tony

April 29th, 2010
9:10 am

V-you hit the nail on the head.

Regarding merit pay, ABS – I’m sorry but you have it backwards and many people have been lulled into thinking the very same thing. However, teachers who work with low performing students are the ones who stand to gain the most. There was an essay written by a UGA professor posted in this forum just a few days ago that made this point very clearly.

Just A Teacher

April 29th, 2010
10:00 am

I teach in a high school which has experienced a dramatic shift in our student population since the fiasco in our neighboring county involving SACS and accreditation. We have seen a tremendous influx of students who feel entitled to abuse or intimidate teachers. Furthermore, when I attempt to contact the parents of these miscreants, the phones are disconnected, e-mails go unanswered, and those parents whom I do manage to contact are disinterested in their child’s behavior in school. I have also been told that our alternative school is filled to capacity, so these problem children must remain in our school to cause problems for their teachers and their fellow students.

Just A Teacher

April 29th, 2010
10:03 am

The filter is hard at work again.

A Different Opinion

April 29th, 2010
10:07 am

I had a white principal of a N. DeKalb School tell me years ago that she finally had to resign because she could not take the abuse thrown at her by the black students from South DeKalb that were bused in. When she tried to discipline them, they just looked at her and said……F….you….I don’t have to listen to you. That same thing is probably still going on today and these unruly students are probably still getting away with it……this is more a parental problem more than anything else caused by those parents who don’t care and it’s also an administrative problem by those who are afraid of repercussions from trying to enforce good behavior. Our schools are becoming worse than the ghetto schools of New York, Chicago, LA, etc. and we’d better take care of the problem now or the problem is going to consume us.

Meme

April 29th, 2010
10:10 am

We have a policy that cell phones must not be out in the school building. A couple of days ago, a student rounded the corner and took out her cell. She looked up to see me. I held out my hand and told her to give me her phone. She looked at me and said that she had to call her mother. I told her I didn’t care. She was not suppose to have the phone out and she needed to give it to me. She snapped her phone shut, gave me a dirty look and passed by me. I asked an administrator to get the phone. She is spending a couple of days in ISS but that is the type of disrespect the middle schoolers are showing.

something to think about

April 29th, 2010
10:16 am

Elizabeth

April 29th, 2010
10:19 am

“In classrooms where quality instruction is happening, most students are behaving appropriately.”

I agtree. That SHOULD be true. But today there are many studetnsz who do not want instruction of any kind. Give them cute group activities and games and more( but NOT all) of them will behave. Some will not ever behave. Instruction of any kind cannot occur if the teacher has to constantly stop and intervene with disruptors and indifferent students who would rather sneak their Gameboy or IPOD into the classroom than listen and learn. Most kids do not think they have to do anything the adult says or do any work that is not “fun”. Well, too bad. I repeat, I will not stand naked on my desk and put on a show to teach those students. All work is not fun. But most kids think any work is useless.

Reality

April 29th, 2010
10:51 am

Merit pay for teachers is stupid. How can a teacher be held accountable for the performance of someone else. A teacher should be held accountable for their own performance, period.

A students performance can be altered by too many things outside of a teachers control. A few are obvious and some are not. What if a parent doesn’t care to ensure that the student attends school – so the student is only in class a few days a week. A teacher’s pay should suffer because of it?

What if the parents are poor and only feeds the child dinner every other night – so the student is unable to focus to learn. The teacher’s pay should suffer?

What if the child parties every night (absentee parents) and doesn’t get to bed until 1 AM – so the child basically sleeps through class. The teacher’s pay should suffer?

Name one other profession that connects salary to something like this – you cannot. A car sales person’s pay is not connected to the car performance. A surgeons pay is not connected to the performance of the patient. A dentists pay is not connected to the performance of the teeth. Why should a teachers pay be connected to the performance of the student?

It just doesn’t make sense at all.

j nes

April 29th, 2010
10:54 am

If “three-quarters (76 percent) of the public say illegal drugs and students treating teachers with a lack of respect are serious problems,” than roughly one quarter of the public is tolerant of disrespect toward teachers…which would answer the question why I have at least 8 disrespectful students (25%) out of a class of 32. Unfortunately, it only takes one disrespectful student to negatively impact the education of the hard-working, respectful students, so how does the public expect a class with 8 future unemployed criminals to operate?

one eyed jack

April 29th, 2010
12:08 pm

all schools could be cleaned up in a matter of days if you give the classroom teacher the summary authority to expel trouble making student.

V for Vendetta

April 29th, 2010
12:35 pm

j nes,

VERY good observation. I think that statement really breaks it down. Ask any teacher on here about that very topic, and you will get the same response: ONE chronically disruptive student can change the entire learning environment. I’m sure all my fellow teachers will agree.

There is always that one student who is able to ruin the class for everyone else. We he or she is absent, the class is entirely different. Now imagine that there are three, four, five, etc. . . .

You get the picture.

(It is important to note that I am talking about CHRONIC behavior problems, the types of students for which no consequence, threat, or disciplinary measure will work. There is a difference between being in control of your classroom and having a student who can’t be controlled.)

ga

April 29th, 2010
1:02 pm

@meme – why doesn’t your school embrace technology. My son has a teacher that actually does spanish quizzes and the kids play a texting game to learn the spanish vocab! Now that’s innovation and the kids love it

ga

April 29th, 2010
1:06 pm

i get really tired of some of the educators whining over ‘misbehavior’ – especially at the middle school level. These are 12, 13, 14 year olds – they are supposed to be trying for the adults. Chronic misbehavior is an indication the child needs/wants something. Aren’t schools supposed to be indentifying them, if they are learning disabled or have a behavior problem related to something in their environment or need a functional behavior assessment. Do any of the teachers know about functional behavior assessments?

j nes

April 29th, 2010
1:15 pm

ga: You are correct when you say that chronic misbehavior is an indication that a child needs/wants something. Unfortunately, what many of these children need is discipline, but if the school is unwilling/unable to discipline appropriately than the teacher’s hands are tied. Furthermore, when discipline is not applied consistently both in school and at home, it is not effective.

It sounds like you are making excuses for disrespectful students and perpetuating the problem.

Elizabeth

April 29th, 2010
1:18 pm

She teaches them Spanish with a texting game and they love it. Of course they do! This has its place, but what about teaching them that hard work is not always fun? You cannot text your way through the CRCT ot the writing test, and you cannot use texting to write an essay. Those teachers who teach their kids that everything is fun and games are NOT teaching them the realities of life and the job. And they make it doubly hard for teachers who have to teach writing or any other skill that cannot be learned except by hard work and perseverence.

majii

April 29th, 2010
1:52 pm

President Obama cannot do anything unless it passes through both House of Congress first. Congress is the gatekeeper which is something many people forget.

Disrespect for teachers is a very serious problem that hinders a teacher’s ability to do/his her job. Many in the public who have never taught a day in their lives have no clue about what a teacher goes through in an average day. As was previously highlighted, there are many variables that teachers cannot control where students are concerned, and tying teacher pay to the performance of some students is unfair. I had a special needs student whose parents were 100% sure that their child could be successful in college even though the child had failed to pass any portion of the GHSGT. I was prohibited from telling them that they were wrong even though I knew they were. The student could not remember anything we covered in U.S. History class, failed every test, and refused extra help because she did not want the other students to know that she was struggling. This student failed in spite of modifications mandated by her IEP. This is a heavy burden to place on any teacher. Tying the test scores of students like this one to a teacher’s pay is wrong. I had several students who were 11th graders but read at an elementary school level, not to mention the students who wanted to pass but never wanted to work, and the constant struggle I faced fighting with these students trying to convince them to buy into the value of a good education and the value of learning for learning’s sake. I would encourage anyone who would like to know what day to day life is like for a teacher to become certified and do the job and then compare what they were thinking after they took the job to what they were thinking before they began teaching. I guarantee that they will have a different opinion of te challenges teachers face, merit pay, and tying student performance to test scores.

Maducator

April 29th, 2010
2:10 pm

Really, ga? —Teachers should not have to spend the first 3 weeks of school teaching the kids how to respect their teachers and elders in general. That should have been done at home. I can lose a students respect by being an unfair or horrible teacher, but I shouldn’t have to earn it initially. It is people like you who allow students to walk into a classroom thinking that the teachers have to prove themselves to the students and society. Also, If you think we should accept that the kids are “trying” in middle school, then we should give extra pay to all middle school and 9th grade teachers as a form of hazard pay. Chronically misbehaving kids in middle school and high school want something…to win the battle with the teacher or with Mommy and Daddy to get attention. That doesn’t make them special needs students. It makes them students who especially need to know the world doesn’t revolve around them. As well, you are like the patient who spent a few seconds on Web MD, who goes to the doctor and tries to talk the talk. Either become educated about education (both a specialilzed content and the science of education, which, by the way, is a dynamic field of study in which students in the field must be currently updated/educated) or leave it up to the people who know what they are talking about.

Kira Willis

April 29th, 2010
2:38 pm

Ga,
12, 13, 14 year olds are supposed to be trying for their parents; they are at school to learn. Teachers must be able to teach, and if a child can’t behave himself or herself, then he or she should not be in the classroom with those who DO want to learn.

Kira Willis

April 29th, 2010
2:42 pm

ga

April 29th, 2010
3:10 pm

I am not making excuses for disrespectful students whatsoever. A child is most definitely going to behave better IF the educator in the classroom clearly states what is expected. And have rules that are concise with consequences. What is wrong with that picture. If an educator can’t do that, they don’t belong in the classroom. That’s my story, I’m sticking to it. And I see nobody answered the question about Functional Behavior Assessment. For all those kids having a behavior issue, have you tried an FBA?

ga

April 29th, 2010
3:18 pm

and the expectations and consequences should be Age appropriate I hope.

ga

April 29th, 2010
3:55 pm

And why shouldn’t you earn respect initially, you’re the adult in the classroom. Be the top dog ! Please do not tell me I don’t know what I’m talking about, my husband is a coach. He leads by example and he leads by giving concise expectations. When there is a problem he pulls a kid aside and it gets corrected.

j nes

April 29th, 2010
3:58 pm

Again ga, you are talking about an imaginary perfect world where educators are allowed to deliver consequences that will deter bad bad behavior. That is like saying people will not commit murder if there is an appropriate consequence. Last time I checked, even states with the death penalty have murders.

You are naive.

j nes

April 29th, 2010
4:01 pm

A coach has much different role than a teacher. The student wants to play the sport; they do not value education. Apples and oranges. You do not know what you are talking about.

Booklover

April 29th, 2010
4:06 pm

@ga

I have done FUBAs (that is the acronym as I’ve always seen it referred) for multiple students. All it does is give data about the student’s misbehavior. While this helps us understand what might be precipitating an outburst in class, on its own a FUBA does not change behavior.

The FUBAs I have filled out have helped the special education teachers devise possible ways to handle behavior problems, but to be frank, every student I’ve done a FUBA for was a 9th grader who did not pass the CRCTs and was socially promoted to high school. Every one of these students lacked the academic skills, the emotional maturity, and the work ethic to succeed in high school. A FUBA on its own cannot solve endemic behavior problems that have gone on for a decade or more. A FUBA will not change a student’s home life, will not stop an enabling parent, will not solve behavior problems which appear to have a genetic/chemical basis.

BTW, my boyfriend is an Army officer. I’m not on some military website claiming to know how to catch all the terrorists and shoot and M-4 with perfect accuracy. Get in the CLASSROOM (NOT the playing field/ court!) yourself (don’t talk about your “husband being a coach”) before you tell other people how to run their classrooms. You exhibit a lot of attitude and disrespect yourself.

ga

April 29th, 2010
4:06 pm

so untrue, i’ve been around kids plenty, volunteered plenty. I don’t see where kids today are any worse than say 10 years ago, or 20 years ago. I just love it when people want to scape goat children. If you instill the love of learning, you’ll get results. One of my kids graduated high school a few years ago, and he constantly complained the last year of school that they were not doing anything in the classroom, that he would rather be workign than wasting time. Mind you this was a kid on the honor roll. I would like to know why his time was wasted for nearly one year. Couldn’t they be doing something with the kids. There is a lot of wasted time spent in school. My kids are currently complaining they aren’t doing much after the CRCT’s too! I see this as a problem! I wish I could pull them out of school now and supplement what they learned all year long by homeschooling them at this juncture. There are teachers out there that have unreasonable expectations too. Still no answer on FBA’s. Aren’t you teachers required under IDEA and child find to clearly identify children that need help. For example – how many reg ed teachers out there know about auditory processing disorder or high functioning autism?

Booklover

April 29th, 2010
4:14 pm

@ga

Again, to counter your claims with an analogy: I volunteer with the military family organizations. I see soldiers and their families under specific situations, and I can comment on my own experiences. I cannot, however, claim to have some sort of expert knowledge about fighting a war because of the job my man has and the volunteer work I do.

Regular education teachers are all required by the PSC (Professional Standards Commission) to take the Exceptional Child course in order to be certified. This means that all teachers with a regular (not provisional or emergency) certificate have some knowledge of the main learning disorders and the autism spectrum. We are not, however, experts, nor are we expected to be; that is the purview of the special education teachers. You can find regular ed teachers who DO have some specialized knowledge, either from coursework, personal experience, or individual interest. I am an expert in teaching secondary English. I am not an expert in special education and neither I nor the PSC claims that I am. This is why my sped students all have caseload teachers as well, with whom I communicate on a regular basis.

ga

April 29th, 2010
4:18 pm

@booklover – you have described the problem very well. Reg Ed teachers don’t have enough knowledge and/or training in special ed. When you have neither you will label children as ‘disrespectful’ when that may not be the case… as in auditory processing disorder or high functioning autism. I would suggest that with 1 in 100 children being diagnosed on the autism spectrum, you guys need to get on the schtick