Do lawmakers have any idea what today’s classroom requires? Do they care?

I wrote my education column for the AJC Opinion page Monday on the issue of merit pay. I heard from many teachers, including this ESOL teacher. I am sharing this response as the teacher makes excellent points.

As a 22 year veteran teacher in Georgia public schools, I am compelled to let you know what I’m thinking of the merit pay proposals — probably because my legislators don’t seem to give a flying flip about what I think.

I am annoyed, first of all, that legislators take it upon themselves to rewrite the compensatory rules for my profession when so many haven’t set foot in a public high school classroom in decades.  I think your comparison of my profession to that of the cardiologist is fitting as it is true that I only see some students for an hour or less a day.  My students are English language learners and I wonder how many legislators know what kind of skills are required to teach this population.  Many can not read or write in their home language, and have no computer literacy.

I think Bill Gates’  ‘’survey” showing that graduate degrees had minimal impact on a teacher’s efficacy was biased, uninformed, or just plain inaccurate.  Teaching high school-aged special populations in a school with an enrollment greater than 2,400 students, aging technology, and rapidly shrinking face-to-face instructional time presents even the most experienced and prepared teacher challenges every day.

I have seen my instructional time dwindle steadily since I began teaching high school in 1989; back then we tested for 3 to 4 days each year and now we test for over 15 days each year:  3 solid weeks of testing students.  I used to be discouraged and actually composed several letters to the Georgia Department of Education to let them know what a waste of time this excessive testing is for my students.

Lately, I have begun to realize that all of this testing has, in a sense, made my job easier.  I don’t have to teach critical reading and critical thinking anymore; all I have to do is teach my students how to select the one BEST answer on a multiple choice test.  Performance-based compensation for me  is a dead end because my students don’t ”perform” on a standardized test — unless it is one that measures their own personal progress in English language acquisition year over year.  For I am an ESOL teacher, and my job is to teach these foreign-born students about the United States culture, the English language, and mastery of the cognitive academic language.

If U.S. students are only learning how to select the one BEST answer on multiple choice tests, then as a nation we are sure to continue our slip to the bottom as our students’ abilities are compared to those of other students from places like Korea, Scandinavia, and Japan.  The United States needn’t require teachers to have masters’ degrees since teachers won’t even be necessary to teach anymore.

We can be simply replaced with videos and online tutoring.  States will save lots of money on teacher compensation.  I spend an inordinate amount of classroom time teaching the test these days, and my skills and talents are being wasted.  I believe an unskilled, brand new teacher fresh out of training could do this kind of work better than I can and for far less money.

Lately I’ve decided that perhaps I should be teaching in a college classroom, where standardized testing is not allowed, and teachers work with students to learn to think critically and independently.  My lessons won’t be interrupted with fire drills, morning announcements, prom court voting, standardized testing, or pep rallies.

When will Georgia legislators show us teachers some professional respect? Do they have any idea how best to deal with a balky LCD overhead projector while 18 squirming ninth graders wait to show their projects on it — half of whom never worked on a computer before last week?  Do they know how to teach students to select the one BEST answer after reading two pages of literary reviews printed side by side asking them to compare the two writers, neither of whom students have ever heard about?

Do they know how to make a student understand an allusion based on a Western literary work or work of art when that student is Mexican, Asian, or African?   Can they handle these kinds of issues on a class schedule that shortens class time to just 30 minutes?  Do these legislators know how to tell a student who has a 3.5 GPA that she won’t be able to participate in the graduation ceremony next month with her classmates because she hasn’t yet passed the Georgia High School Graduation Test in social studies?

Most importantly, do they know how to prevent a promising student from dropping out because even if he can pass the tests in all 5 areas, he still won’t be able to get a job because he will remain an undocumented immigrant, albeit a bilingual one who is fully versed in our education system, having satisfied enrollment and attendance expectations? Surely, none of this requires any sort of extraordinary talent or skill. Surely, teachers are overpaid, but not bankers.

Many of our best and brightest students are discouraged by these strict rules that prevent them from reaching their full potential.  These redundant and superfluous standardized tests are wasting my valuable time and skills. I say let the inexperienced and un-degreed take this profession and do with it what they can, and I’ll take my time and talent elsewhere.

45 comments Add your comment

Veteran teacher, 2

April 26th, 2010
10:59 pm

Well said. The legislators will know when we remember in November and vote them out on November 2, 2010. It is now my mission in life to get rid of as many sitting legislators as possible. Who’s with me?

Teacher/Learner

April 26th, 2010
11:02 pm

thank you…for your feelings and ever so spot on observations. Thank you.

Chances for improvement

April 26th, 2010
11:03 pm

The odds that Georgia’s educational system will be fixed are approximately 1-48,000.

The fact that those are the same odds the Apophis asteroid will crash into the Earth is strictly coincidental.

Where are the teachers?

April 26th, 2010
11:05 pm

Aren’t there some teachers, or spouses of teachers in the General Assembly? Where are their voices during this unprecedented assault on teachers?

Teacher/Learner

April 26th, 2010
11:07 pm

I so wish I was allowed to reveal the “DUH – how can we NOT know this”, and often redundant questions asked of my first grade children this past week on CRCT. Unfortunately, I had to sign a document swearing not to do this or lose my certificate…PLEASE, Maureen, write an editorial demanding the FIRST GRADE READING and MATHEMATICS CRCT test items be released…we are in a dead zone for thinking and academic achievement.

Just a Thought

April 26th, 2010
11:07 pm

The short answer is no. A better question is do lawmakers really care enough about lasting and substantial reform to go and find out? Reform can not be based on secondary information and the views of education “experts” who haven’t taught in a public school in the last 20 years.

Where is Kathy Cox?

April 26th, 2010
11:08 pm

Maureen why haven’t you asked Matt to comment on Kathy Cox’s LACK OF LEADERSHIP when it comes to what’s happening to Gwinnett teachers?

Let’s hope ALL VOTERS will remember how Kathy Cox is turning her back on teachers AND children with her silence.

[...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Maureen Downey. Maureen Downey said: Do lawmakers have any idea what today’s classroom requires? http://bit.ly/9M9SdL [...]

NancyPants

April 26th, 2010
11:28 pm

What is going on with the cheating “probe” at APS? I know this is off-topic (sort of) but I haven’t heard anything about it. As a teacher at a “severe” school, and after seeing what happened at my school during the CRCT which finished today I am just wondering if this topic is going to be lost??? I certainly don’t want to see the useless excuses for administrators at my school get away with what they have done. I know they say you reap what you sow, but these folks seem to be plowing ahead to higher salaries and more power with the help of our wonderful superintendent and her trusty sidekick, Augustine.

Maureen Downey

April 26th, 2010
11:33 pm

@NancyPants, What happened at your school during the CRCT? Maureen

GoodforKids

April 26th, 2010
11:33 pm

Thanks for this excellent letter from the ESOL teacher. It just feels good to have someone say SOME of what teachers and students take on every day.

Kathy Cox is a follower. Must be a product of bubble tests- she did not learn to think critically or reason analytically or LEAD with any true concern or understanding of what is right for education community (including students, teachers, administrators, etc).

My first grader just took the CRCT’s and some of the items sounded dumb based on her reporting. What a waste of teacher expertise, student/teacher time, and student/teacher enthusiasm for learning! We prepare them to bubble at the cost of meaningful engagement in learning. I am not a teacher, but I have known many terrific teachers in my time around education. I know those teachers (who have great talent, skill, and a passion for their profession) must be banging their heads on their desks as they teach to, then administer this basic skills bunk (which is neither reliable or valid as far as we know).

I still do not know who is creating these tests. But I know they are doing OK in a down economy.

GoodforKids

April 26th, 2010
11:39 pm

Can someone keep us posted on state budget cuts? I know the list proposed cutting first and second grade CRCT’s, but I heard one of the Fulton BOE members say she doubted Loe and the board would let that stand. In other words, if the state cuts funding to administer first and second grade CRCT’s, the county, despite all its desperate financial hardship, will find a way to fund it locally.

3BoysMom

April 26th, 2010
11:52 pm

I am so tired of seeing teachers “teach to the test!” Our students do not know how to think for themselves. Every January the focus is passing the CRCT and instruction follows those lines. Do legislators realize we also are teaching students how to behave appropriately, dress correctly and just maybe we get a little parental support from the ones who need it the most. Ask any teacher and they will tell you the parent they need to see the most never makes an appearance at their child’s conference. They want to increase class size, GREAT just more behavior issues to deal with and less teaching!!! Get real – it should be mandatory for every legislature to come to a classroom for a full day!!!!

Eleanor

April 27th, 2010
5:14 am

I agree – we need to get rid of as many Legislator’s as possible; Kathy Cox needs to go and should have been gone long ago; and I doubt that any of the present Legislator’s could even pass the CRCT. Let our teachers T E A C H. There are many students who are getting good grades but when it comes to CRCT test, they do not pass. Something is wrong here.

ScienceTeacher671

April 27th, 2010
6:22 am

Echoing GoodForKids, I still think there must be some backdoor financial connection between the testing companies and someone at the higher levels of state government. Has anyone checked into this?

Private School Guy

April 27th, 2010
6:26 am

Why don’t they just impose the merit system on those in charge first to see if it works. Let administrators face fiscal judgement by CRCT results.

d

April 27th, 2010
6:33 am

I dare the governor or any of the other legislators to come into my Economics classroom with just a page from the Georgia Performance Standards and teach my class for a day — and truly assess (not a multiple choice test) the class to see if the students learned. Heck, I’d even let them give a multiple choice test but doubt that would be much help. I am so tired of people not in education saying how bad public education is. Just look at the story from Lakeside — a DeKalb public school — and you can see that some of our best and brightest are coming from Georgia public schools. Let me do my job and teach and you will see the results you want without all this unnecessary testing. In the mean time, as a friend of mine signs her e-mails with “A CHILD IS MORE THAN A TEST SCORE.”

Fericita

April 27th, 2010
6:35 am

I loved hearing form a fellow ESOL teacher! I wholeheartedly agree – There IS a huge lack of awareness at the state level regarding ESOL instruction, and it is having a harmful effect on our ESOL kids. I am very grateful to have a Master’s degree because my graduate program exposed me to a lot of current, well-proven, and tried-and-true research about ESOL students and langauge learning that our state lawmakers and educational policy-makers are clueless about. For example:

1) If a student does not learn to read and write in their native language, his/her chances of becoming literate in the second language are severely hindered. Yet, in my county at least, we have no bilingual programs and few books available in languages other than English.

2) It takes 5 – 7 years to learn a second language to cognitive academic fluency. But in Georgia, our ESOL students are expected to be on grade level during their second year of entry in U.S. schools. ESOL students as a subgroup must pass the CRCT regardless.

3) Multiple-choice tests are the worst type of test for language learners, since there is so much language to sort through. The CRCT (or other, similarly designed tests) end up testing ESOL students’ language skills, not their ability in math, reading, science, etc. Open-ended/short answer questions are a much better test to truly see how an ESOL student is performing.

4) The accommodations available on state exams, meant to even that out, are really designed for Special Ed students, and are made available to ESOL students because the state isn’t sure how else to help them out.

These are just some of the frustrations of teaching in a state that doesn’t want to acknowledge the rapid growth of ESOL students in our school systems. There is so much more we could be doing to prepare these students for a productive, bilingual life.

With all that said, I LOVE working with ESOL students because they are so motivated to learn and excited about the opportunities available. My students love learning and their excitement makes my job so enjoyable.

Teach

April 27th, 2010
6:45 am

TELL THEM

April 27th, 2010
7:04 am

Please contact these legislators and express your views before they vote on SB 521 now including the merit pay framework amendment.

roberta.abdul-salaam@house.ga.gov, staceyabrams@gmail.com, kathyashe@me.com, blackellis@bellsouth.net, tbrooks@legis.state.ga.us, rbruce5347@aol.com, debbie.buckner@house.ga.gov, amy.carter@house.ga.gov, toneycollins95@gmail.com, rickcrawford@bellsouth.net, dee.dawkins-haigler@house.ga.gov, elly.dobbs@house.ga.gov, rondodson@comcast.net, pat.dooley@house.ga.gov, dren16999@aol.com, wdukes_2000@yahoo.com, carl.epps@house.ga.gov, hughfloyd@mindspring.com, vfludd@mindspring.com, gloria.frazier@house.ga.gov, mike.glanton@house.ga.gov, jcraig@statewidehealthcare.com, gerald.greene@house.ga.gov, keith.heard@house.ga.gov, michele.henson@house.ga.gov, segaeducators@gmail.com, wayne.howard@house.ga.gov, carolyn.hugley@house.ga.gov, lynmore.james@house.ga.gov, terry.johnson@house.ga.gov, kevinlevitas@bellsouth.net, ralph@ralphlong.name, repmangham@gmail.com, marinstatehouse@aol.com, barbara.reece@house.ga.gov, rahn.mayo@house.ga.gov, doug@dougmckillip.com, bily.mitchell@house.ga.gov, alisha@alishamorgan.com, mosb7101@hotmail.com, quincy.murphy@house.ga.gov, mmo@mmolaw.com, duboseporter@gmail.com, nikki.randall@house.ga.gov, jay.shaw@house.ga.gov, calvinsmyre@synovus.com, mickey.stephens@gmail.com, pam.stephenson@house.ga.gov, stuckey@mindspring.com, rashadjtaylor@gmail.com, rteilhet@yahoo.com, bwthomas@bellsouth.net, lee.thompson@house.ga.gov, earnest.williams@house.ga.gov, caw@centurytel.net

Teaching in FL is worse

April 27th, 2010
7:45 am

Amazing….I am a Special Ed teacher and we are kindred spirits with ESOL.

If you want to get a few non-educators upset, increase classroom sizes. If you want to get a few more upset, cut music. If you REALLY want to get attention, cut sports!!! How sad….

Newton County is looking to cut middle school sports, and FINALLY parents are getting upset enough to demonstrate.

(BTW, I am a coach.)

GrassNotGreener

April 27th, 2010
8:13 am

I understand and feel your pain; however, don’t think the grass is greener here at the college level, especially in ESL. The first program that Dr. Tricoli put on the chopping block at GPC because of pending budget cuts was the ESL program. However, even though it looks like the budget cuts will not be so extreme, Georgia Perimeter is using the crisis to undercut the academic quality of the ESL program. Class size is increasing by 50 and 60 percent. There is also a push to reduce the number of credit hours in the program. All of this leads to watered-downed requirements and less prepared students. There is also the rumor that the BOR wants to eliminate all the lower level Learning Support and ESL courses in the USG. So, unfortunately, the situation in some regards is no better in the college setting.

Gwinnett Parent

April 27th, 2010
9:21 am

As mentioned yesterday, if the students cannot read they should not be taking the CRCT. I have to laugh at the fact that the teacher reads the comprehension portion of the CRCT. Even if it is part of the comprehension section, it is acknowledgement that the students are not capable of the skills required on the test. If a student is not reading by the end of first grade, they need help. Also, if the teacher has a thick accent or dialect it could affect the student’s ability to understand him or her. It’s hard to imagine an ESOL student listening a Southern Belle from South Georgia without difficulty. Eventhough I am not an educator, I am fluent in 3 languages, have a minor in one of them, worked in International Sales for several years, and married an immigrant. Every ESL learner I have ever met complains about being able to understand dialects. Infact, a dialect is one of the hardest parts of any language to grasp.

On the other hand, I have to disagree with the previous poster about the cuts in the ESL program at the college level. If a student cannot understand English, he or she should not attend a University in this country. My immigrant husband graduated from Georgia State with a 3.9 G.P.A. and did not take ESOL or any remedial English classes. I also knew several foreign students in college. They were all expected to be fluent before being accepted.

Booklover

April 27th, 2010
9:40 am

The answer is that most legislators DO NOT care. “Your actions speak so loudly, I can’t hear what you are saying.”

In coastal Georgia, we invited 3 local legislators to a public forum, and all three confirmed they were coming. One cancelled on the morning of the forum, and another called at 3 pm to say he wasn’t coming. One of these gentlemen had been on a local news program that same morning. In other words, they will do the TV time and the promotions, but when it comes to answering tough questions in a forum and being held responsible, many lawmakers simply ARE NOT SERVING THE PEOPLE.

Kudos to Al WIlliams, who showed up and answered questions honestly and helpfully. I’m helping Al Williams next time he’s up for office, and I’m actively campaigning against the other two already, as are many of my colleagues.

This forum and the turnout–packed with teachers and local voters, but missing two of three confirmed lawmakers–was covered on two local TV stations and at least one newspaper:

http://www.coastalcourier.com/news/archive/18881/

HS Teacher, Too

April 27th, 2010
9:46 am

This is very well said, and the concerns are accurate for more than just SpEd and ESOL. Something I’ve always said is that legislators have only ever been in the classroom as students — and as good students, at that. They have no idea of the may and varied things that we deal with that are not coming from the rosy college-prep and honors classrooms. Since I can’t say it any better than the post already did, I’ll leave it at that. Now, if only our legislators would listen!

GrassNotGreener

April 27th, 2010
9:46 am

Gwinnett Parent, colleges and universities all across the nation offer ESL programs as a way to give access to recent immigrants, refugees, and others to our higher education system. Many of our ESL students at GPC excel in other college courses while polishing their English abilities. They also deserve a chance at a college education.

HS Teacher, Too

April 27th, 2010
9:52 am

Typo: should say *many*

who taught these clowns???

April 27th, 2010
10:18 am

I guess most of their teachers are now retired…

We just reap what we have sown…

ga

April 27th, 2010
10:52 am

So Well Said, thank you for this. My kids just took the CRCT last week and they tell me that they won’t be doing much in class, since the focus was on the CRCT and teaching to the test. I sure hope my kids are not sitting in the class doing nothing for the next month. It’s frustrating as a taxpayer and parent to know that schools primarily teach to a standardized test.

Puddin Tain

April 27th, 2010
11:03 am

Teachers can’t be legislators because they can’t take leave from their jobs. Thus, education issues are decided by those who have no clue as to what goes on in a classroom. On the other hand, every legislator thinks he/she is an expert because they “went” to school.

David

April 27th, 2010
11:08 am

MY wife and I are both educators. I understand the frustration expressed regarding performance-based pay and the lack of “understanding” by elected officials. The ongoiong downward spiral in public education in Georgia is the consequence of societal failure to value education and appreciate those who educate. It is also a consequence of the ever-expanding entitlement mentality in this country. It’s difficult to give someone something they don’t want or don’t value. The bottom line is that many Georgians would rather have a check than an education or a job!!! And, many politicians would rather hand out the checks that support education.

While I’m on my soap box, the educational establishment is to blame also. When you talk about cleaning house at the capital, don’t forget to clean the State Department of Education house of its liberal, politically-correct, testing-obsessed, compliance-oriented bureacrats!!!

I just had another idea, let’s return to teachin reading, writing and arithmetic and hold students and parents accountable. If Johnny can’t read, keep in the 2nd grade til he dies of old age. If Sally can’t do long division, keep in the 4th grade til she’s an ole maid! And, don’t give either one of them a driver’s license until they are on track to graduate and revoke it if they don’t.

Teacher can and should be paid based on performance, but only after we hold everybody else accountable!!!!

The Apple Doesn't Fall

April 27th, 2010
11:13 am

I would like to see Billy Boy’s research documentation on advanced degrees. I did my dissertation on the effects of teacher qualification on student achievement, and my results pointed to a definite correlation between the two. Of course, my research was all Georgia-based, but the numbers that I had showed that the better qualified their teachers were, the better results the systems had. I went through defense, and it passed, so my stats were checked. So considering my numbers tell a different story, I’d like to see how he came up with his.

Dee

April 27th, 2010
11:13 am

I am a broken record — what teachers need in the classroom is the authority to remove those students who do not desire to learn and who are disruptive and “steal” the educational experience of the other students in class. I discussed this last night with my 12yo. While he admitted that “gosh mom, no kid really wants to be in school all day” he also acknowledged that he knows he has to be there and that he works hard for an education what will afford him the ability to be a successful adult. He then told me that his math class has a very disruptive student and that the teacher has explained that the student cannot be removed from class because “he has been moved once already after being a problem in his previous math class.” The teacher is so fed up that when the disruptive student leaves the class to use the washroom the teacher states aloud that at least they will now have 3 minutes of peace. And this is in the “county of milk and honey.” Seriously, how are teachers supposed to teach and students supposed to learn when one student is permitted to disrupt the process? One room per school, no windows, heads down, no noise, completing worksheets on the three Rs under the “supervision” of a teacher who also used to be a USMC drill instructor is the solution I propose for children who cannot behave in class.

Elizabeth

April 27th, 2010
11:26 am

My cousin’s children moved to Europe ( France) when their father remarried and were placed in a French school. One was 10, one was 14. Neither knew a word of French. NO allowances were made for them because they did not know the language. It meant hours of study, some tutoring from their stepmother, and a lot of work, but within a year they were fluent in spoken and written French. Perhaps if we required this of all our immigrants we would be better of. Children learn faster than adults. If we stopped babying people and stopped having tests and signs in other languages, they would be forced to learn English. As it is, they have no incentive to do so.

Accountability at all levels

April 27th, 2010
11:39 am

Tried to post earlier. Hope this doesn’t duplicate.

My wife and I are both educators in Georgia. The ongoing downward spiral in Georgia public education is said. It is occuring because of multiple failings, including, but not limited to misguided elected officials.

Local leaders, including superintendents and school boards are more concerned with funding, AYP, graduation rate, and the likes, than they are with education. We live in a time when education is not valued and educators are not respected. No one is held accountable – not students, not parents, not school superintendents, not school boards, not… not…. not…!

It is hard to give someone and education when they don’t want it or value it! The entitlement mentality has taken over. Student have been told that education is a right. No, it isn’t! It is a privilege if one ceases the opportunity. Why get an education, when you can get a check??

So, while we throw the legislature under the bus, save room for the liberal, politically correct, entitlement-minded, testing-obsessed, curriculum standards compulsive, program you to death bureacrats at the GA Dept of Education.

Let’s get back to reading, writing and arithmetic and hold students, parents, and community accountable. If Johnny can’t read, keep him in the 2nd grade til he’s old enough to ???. If Sally can’t do long division in the 4th grade then keep her there till she’s old enough to ?? To heck with all these standards and complex curricula. Students who can’t do the basics can’t go to college, learn a skill or trade or become a contributing part of society.

It’s all about accountability for everyone. When we get back to the basics, we (the teachers of the State) won’t be threatened by performance and accountability.

Bell Curve

April 27th, 2010
11:41 am

The honest truth is they don’t care. There is an agenda to destroy public education and offer vouchers to parents to enroll thier children in all the wonderful market based alternatives that will develop. This is the fantasy of the “far right”, they apparently refuse to believe that the unregulated free market will solve all problems. They are well on their way to getting their wish.

Bell Curve

April 27th, 2010
11:42 am

meant to say they believe the free market will solve all problems

Accountability at all levels

April 27th, 2010
11:45 am

Sorry – “ceases” should have been “seizes”. Was in a hurry!

Dee

April 27th, 2010
12:09 pm

sigh….”what” equals “that”. Typing too quickly. :)

In the mix

April 27th, 2010
12:39 pm

I was pleased that the ESOL teacher wrote such a compelling response to the article on merit pay, and saddened that she had to.

Merit pay further handicaps low performing schools by incenting the best teachers to teach at the best/better schools where they know their talents, skills, dedication, and enthusiasm will be put to use and honored. Lower ranking schools are then left with… well, what’s left.

The author did make a key point: she can take her time and talents elsewhere. Her expertise and experience would be highly valued at an international school where she will earn more, not pay taxes (Foreign Earned Income Exemption), and probably have her housing provided or subsidized. She will be able to work in a context in which her skills are valued, instructional time is maximized, critical teaching skills are taught through performance-based learning, classrooms are adequately equipped, and she doesn’t have to spend her personal funds on class supplies….

Is it any wonder, then, that the gap between the haves and the have-nots continues to grow? We stand idly by, discussing more standardized testing, while Students in Asia, Scandinavia, and other countries far outpace our students in every domain?

Why are we STILL having this conversation? Shouldn’t a nation with the intellectual, financial, and human capital like ours be able to solve this problem?

@ Dee

April 27th, 2010
3:33 pm

Why don’t you (better yet you and some other parents) go to the principal and if need be the county office and complain about your son’s education being disrupted? Keep complaining until they do something. Go to your BOe member if necessary. Sad to say, but only when parents get involved will anything be done. If you complain enough, they will most likely move this child from your son’s classroom. He will be someone else problem, but you can only look after your son’s education.

mlp

April 28th, 2010
7:03 am

Only in our absence will we be missed.

samlee

April 28th, 2010
10:58 am

As a special educator, I agree with the ESL teacher. We address standardized tests daily. While my students have IEPs giving them modifications in the regular classroom, they must take the same standardized tests. Without a passing score on these tests, they do not receive a high school diploma. What is the point? The children do not see the need for ownership of their learning, their parents are convinced we don’t like their child and that we don’t know how to teach and now the state is telling everyone that we are not qualified. Woe is us if they think these children will become contributing members of society.

octex

April 28th, 2010
12:40 pm

Please scroll up and read:
@Accountability at all levels
April 27th, 2010
11:39 am
I agree with you completely!

octex

April 28th, 2010
12:49 pm

@ga I understand that teacher’s attitude, I teach an EOCT class where after it is completed next week, “I” am pretty much done. My principal does not care about academics, he cares about how the public sees him and our school. My principal wants all “problems” to stay out of his office so I make sure from my end he does not get any. The work I put in with my students and to this school has gone way above and beyond what I am compensated for. If all my bosses want are good test scores, then by golly I will work my hardest to make sure they pass but I will not lose any sleep over any children who do not care because I know in my heart I have done a great job.