Is “acting white” a legacy of integration policies that shortchanged blacks?

As the white adoptive parent of two black children, Harvard Law graduate Stuart Buck began to read about education and race and became intrigued by the “acting white” epithet sometimes directed at at high-achieving minority students.

That personal interest grew into a professional one that culminated in a book due out in May, “Acting White, the Ironic Legacy of Desegregation.”

A doctoral student in education at the University of Arkansas, Buck says his research led him to a surprising conclusion, that the “acting white” criticism had its roots in desegregation that wrenched black students from schools and communities they knew and threw them into new schools where they were often reviled, shunned and underestimated.

“The analogy I would draw is treatment for cancer,” said Buck, speaking by phone from Arkansas. “Segregation is like a cancer that we had to get rid of, but the treatment that saved our lives had unintended side effects.”

While black students often attended segregated schools that lacked the resources of white facilities, Buck says the schools served as the connective tissue in a community that historically valued education.

“In segregated schools, black children had consistently seen other blacks succeeding in the academic world,’’ he says. “The authority figures and role models — teachers and principals were all black. And the best students in the schools were black as well.”

While black parents welcomed integration, they had hoped for a merger of black and white schools. Instead, they witnessed the destruction of black schools and the erasure of the culture, community and closeness that the schools had created. Their children marched off to white schools where they experienced hostility and were tracked into lower-level classes. In his research, Buck found many examples of where even new facilities that had housed black schools were abandoned because white parents weren’t willing to send their kids to black schools.

“They did not want to send white schoolchildren into black schools, to be taught by black teachers and disciplined by black principals,” he says.

A University of Georgia and Harvard Law graduate, Buck cites Butler High School in Gainesville, which was built in 1962 but closed seven years later as part of the desegregation plan.

Black principals were demoted or fired, and teachers made to feel unwanted in the integrated settings. Buck notes that Gainesville had 115 white teachers and 70 black teachers in 1966. Three years later, 22 black teachers remained.

The loss was significant to the city’s black students because black teachers usually lived in the same community, knew the families of students and delighted in their successes.

There was an affection that was not easily replicated with white teachers who did not live in the same communities, attend the same churches or shop in the same stores.

In losing their school, Gainesville’s black students lost their mascot, their school colors, their yearbook and newspaper. Buck says the uprooting of black students from familiar and supportive environments was made even more difficult by the reception in their new schools.

Buck draws on news accounts of the era in which white students commented, “This is our school and they are just going to have to adjust.” White female teachers, raised to fear black men, were not comfortable teaching black high school boys.

Buck cites the research showing that capable black students are still less likely to be in advanced classes than white peers. Either out of overt racism or “liberal guilt,” Buck says white teachers did not hold black students to high expectations.

Once reassigned to desegregated schools, black students “were sitting in a classroom with mostly other black students in what they believed to be the ‘dumb’ class, watching as the white students headed to the ‘smart’ class down the hall,’’’ writes Buck.

Dispirited, black students began to associate achievement with white students and ostracize peers who joined the white kids in the ‘‘smart’’ classes down the hall.

Among the research that Buck mentions: The findings of Harvard economist Roland Fryer Jr. that while the popularity of white students rises with grade-point average, black children become less popular the better their grades.

He cites the experience of Ron Kirk, the first black mayor of Dallas, who recalled getting beat up at his newly integrated junior high school for being black and again in his neighborhood the same day for not being black enough.

Buck believes it is important to understand anti-school attitudes because he believes that students must be willing partners in education. “From youngest ages, children love learning, but something happens around 10, 11 or 12,” he says. “We have to understand why it is that children, black or white, don’t want to learn.”

166 comments Add your comment

Son of Bill Cosby

February 27th, 2010
7:49 am

While there is in fact a Black and a White culture, the Black culture began to take certain artificial shades.

While my parents speak with accents of a seggregated past, my children are creating a new Black speech and accent while attending fully integrated school. Where does this new accent come from? From the Media—CBS/Sony records…etc…that spin off so-called Black-owned labels which are not but whose artists purports to be the voice and the action of Black Urban Youth…

Lee

February 27th, 2010
7:51 am

So this ultra-liberal, politically correct Yankee blames the BLACK putdown of “acting white” on whites.

What a load of malarky.

Vince

February 27th, 2010
8:03 am

Interesting theory,,,,but incorrect.

K.I.M.

February 27th, 2010
8:15 am

I took offense at the title, thinking this blog would be about how speaking proper English has set black people back. Quite honestly, I think the blog title is simply there to spark controversy; however, ‘acting white’ has nothing to do with the article. Perhaps the proper title would have been, “Did desegregation and integration policies shortchange blacks?”

Having heard desegregation stories from my parents, I can say that certain points validated what I’ve already heard. BUT as an individual both my mother and father went on to earn graduate degrees, become moderately successful and raised a fabulous family. I think the deterioration in ‘black’ education occurred in the last 20 years. Perhaps the side effects of desegregation have finally taken a choke hold on the black community – but I have trouble reconciling my family’s experience to the collective black experience. (And on a different topic, if this theory holds, it would also aim to explain the higher incidence of unemployment in the black community as the uneducated/unskilled are subject to lower employment rates).

The phrase ‘acting white,’ hits home with me because I’ve been told that I act white through out life. For example, I turned the derogatory nickname of “Oreo” and turned it into a name I could stomach “Cookie” when I was in middle school. I didn’t go to an HBCU, I grew up around in suburbia with all whites and therefore adopted the cultural norms as my social paradigm, I work in Corporate America (and like it), I hate the fact that I’m supposed to connect with people simply based on race rather than shared experiences/perspectives. All of those qualities make me who I am, and I’m proud of who I am…and don’t think I’ve been shortchanged in the least. And I’m not sure I’d call my style, “acting white,” I’m acting human – reacting to my life’s circumstances.

jkpatlanta

February 27th, 2010
8:54 am

As a white teacher in an all black school the problem of “acting white” is still prevelant. Many high achieving students are called out by school mates for that and many do not want to take the higher level and AP class for fear of being torrmented. One day, hopefully this country will be able to get over the race issue and only worry about what the students can do academicaly.

Reality Check

February 27th, 2010
9:01 am

In losing their school, Gainesville’s black students lost their mascot, their school colors, their yearbook and newspaper. Buck says the uprooting of black students from familiar and supportive environments was made even more difficult by the reception in their new schools.

We in Atlanta know how this is……some white schools were closed, most renamed for blacks, whites started moving out of the areas that were once thriving and now are the worst of slums populated mostly by blacks, the APS is now in chaos and now someone’s saying it’s because I’m white. I don’t know who this guy is but, it sounds like to me he’s got a chip on his shoulder and is in bad need of a good dose of reality.

Ole Guy

February 27th, 2010
9:11 am

While going through the teacher indoc process, I learned that many educators with the letters DEE and AAR preceeding their names where in fact not really educators by trade, but publishers. Many DEE AARs with whom I came into contact (lots) touted credentials of so many years as an educator whereupon further investigation revealed that the “so many years” included months and months actually teaching. Whereas a chief pilot has logged thousands of hours behind the stick, and a chief surgeon has actually performed many many…perhaps thousands…of proceedures, an educator with the esteemed DEE AAR is, more than likely, a story writer, a publisher.

So it is when I read this excellent review of educational history, dating back to my generation’s high school years. While the facts are sadly true…yes, I remember the separate but equal concept, however, there was nothing at all equal. While we rode the bus to school, daily we would pass the separate-but-definitely-not-equal facilities in what many refered to as “N” Town.

So it is in reading this fine historical survey that I find one issue of particular interest: Just exactly what does the good DEE AAR mean by “…the erasure of culture…”? Could this mean that “the white world” insists on clear speech, and not what has, in recent years, been sanctified as “ebonics”?
Could it mean that the “white world”, particularly the business world, insists on speech emanating from the mouth and not from the flailing about of head and hands? Could it possibly mean the expectance of entitlement in many forms from public dole to so-called reverse discrimination when ultimate qualifications are based on factors far-removed? At the expense of mindlessly being labeled racist and losing the remainder of my sensitivity ribbons, I would suggest casting an eye about the leadership within the govt entities we write of in these blogs.

In sanctifying the behaviors and expectations of the Black Community as “cultural”, the good DEE AAR has, in effect, solidified those behaviors which we, as caring citizens, wish to erase…the thirst for knowledge, the desire to advance, are all labeled as “acting white”. Meanwhile, the “culture” of which the DEE AAR writes is all-too-often decried as “putting the black man down”. When it boils down to cultural issues, I seriously doubt if that knowledge resides in many of us, regardless of race. Could it be that many of these issues of “racial harmony” are indeed borne of insecurity and guilt? I believe that is better known as an ingredient in political correctness. ANY QUESTIONS?

Chris Murphy, Atlanta, GA

February 27th, 2010
9:18 am

I think- and we’re reading Maureens’ (capable, I’m sure) synopsis, not the whole study- it rings true. It is not something that we whites necessarily have to do anything about- now- but blacks would be wise to revisit their history, and see if some adjustments could be made. For example, researching the old black high schools, finding graduates and learning about the cultures of those schools, maybe resurrecting some reunions and finding mascots, events and triumphs of those times to see where they could fit in again in the community. And, for sure, some of those old teachers and administrators would have some good advice on how to deal with some issues we have now. Back then, they must have dealt with, daily, Why should we work hard? What does it matter? It’s still the question that black kids ask of us, despite huge changes in attitudes and reality.

Chris Murphy, Atlanta, GA

February 27th, 2010
9:19 am

Filter grab. Cripes, I hate that, it is egregiously annoying.

Jennifer

February 27th, 2010
9:20 am

An awful lot of this posting seems to me to ring true and make an awful lot of common sense.

Patman

February 27th, 2010
9:26 am

As a black man who is not a RepubliKKKan or conservative, that observation is a crock of you know what! We’ll neve get anywhere if, instead of taking responsibility for our issues and dealing with them, we continue to try to shift blame to the white man! Does anyone truly believe that those who are supposedly responsible for our issues are going to be the ones to resonve them? I’m raising two boys and I teach them to put their best foot forward and to carry themselves in a respectable way no matter who may think that they’re “acting white.” Those who think that way have their own ignorance and upbringing to blame, not some nameless, faceless white person!

ScienceTeacher671

February 27th, 2010
9:41 am

As someone who experienced the integration process first-hand (I suspect some of the posters here are too young to have done so) and as someone who teaches in a “majority-minority” school, many of Buck’s points make sense to me.

I will note that the explanation of Buck’s work presented here is greatly condensed and most-likely simplified (by necessity), and that the full explanation of the “acting white” phenomena is probably much more complex and nuanced.

Pierre

February 27th, 2010
9:44 am

I think Buck’s argument definitely has historical merit. The tragedy is that the wrongs that were inflicted upon the grandparents and parents of today’s students have been internalized by the black community and have evolved into an elaborate, intractable form of self-sabotage. By associating traditional forms of academic success with “acting white,” the black community is only hurting itself over and over, especially since success in today’s and tomorrow’s economy depends more and more on formal education.

As an educator, I see this self-sabotage–this belligerent defense of one’s own ignorance, this retreat into a large, alienated group of one’s similarly hostile peers,and the immense insecurities that have engendered it–played out over and over again. So much promise ends up in self-imposed failure, all with the quiet approbation of the black community. It’s sickening and frustrating to see. As a white man, I’m largely “forbidden” to talk about this in the public sphere, but it seems no one is allowed to talk about it. Look at what happened to Bill Cosby years ago when he broached the topic. He was dismissed as not being black enough (ie. acting and talking white) and therefore he didn’t have the “right” to speak to the issue.

Two other observations. It seems that, with a few exceptions, schools in the greater Atlanta area have by and large undertaken a kind of de facto re-segregation. This re-segregation, now a good 20 years in the making, has not resulted in a renaissance of community and achievement at the overwhelmingly black schools. Quite the reverse. Secondly, there are certainly black parents who want their children to achieve in the conventional academic manner. What schools do you think they move heaven and earth to have their children attend?

Lee

February 27th, 2010
9:47 am

In other news, trainers who put Shetland Ponies in the same pasture as Kentucky Thoroughbreds can’t figure out why they didn’t magically transform into race horses.

For the past 50 years, the politically correct pathogens have been trying to explain away the failed integrationist policies resulting from the hideous Brown vs. Board decision. Ignoring the obvious, they blame whitey.

Yada, yada, yada….

LSH

February 27th, 2010
9:53 am

The problem with comparing desegration with cancer is that however awful the cure is, it’s still a cure. Cancer survivors view their treatment as a horrificially difficult time in their lives. But however primitive and dibilitating the treatment may be, cancer surviors SURVIVE their treatment. Many of them are actually stronger and healthier after their treatment. They don’t sit around and bemoan their fate, they get up, brush themselves off and GET ON WITH THEIR LIVES. 50 years after desegration started, I for one am very tired (and don’t listen anymore) to the continued bemoanment of some African-Americans who blame everything that is wrong with some of their children on whites. I see that desegration did not go the way some people envisioned it- it’s time to get on with already.

Happy Teacher

February 27th, 2010
9:54 am

Go away Lee…

Nikole Allen

February 27th, 2010
9:59 am

@ Lee—-I am not sure what your pony, racehorse analogy means, but there is research that suggests that when you integrate schools based on class (which often coincides with race), students in poverty increase their achievement. Well-off students stay the same, but they were fine to begin with.

Jeff

February 27th, 2010
10:01 am

And white kids “acting black” AREN’T looked down upon or made fun of?

Jeff

February 27th, 2010
10:03 am

I grew up in the 80’s and I went to a public school that was literally 50/50. Why did the white kids at that school tend to score better and be financially more successful than the black kids? I suspect the answer depends on the color of YOUR skin.

ScienceTeacher671

February 27th, 2010
10:08 am

Jeff, were the white kids at that school better off financially while you were in school, after graduation, or both?

octex

February 27th, 2010
10:10 am

Agree with Jeff.

K.I.M.

February 27th, 2010
10:16 am

The blog title is extremely misleading. It’s more so a pontification about the impact of desegregation. My inner Shelby Steele comes out and says, I can’t speak on the collective black society…but I can speak on my individual experience.

I remember stories my father told me about desegregation. My mother went to boarding school where she was the ‘only one.’ Despite the stressful environments that they endured, they were academically successful and went on to earn graduate degrees, and were successful enough in their careers to put 3 children through college.

Culturally, they understood that education unlocked opportunity. I witnessed that sentiment in both my parent’s and grandparents generation. … See More

I’m not sure when the cultural shift occurred in which education was no longer valued Perhaps current generations take it for granted. I think the deteriorating culture is relatively a new thing and I don’t buy into the theory presented in the article, even though I could see where the author is coming from.

catlady

February 27th, 2010
10:22 am

“Buck cites the research showing that capable black students are still less likely to be in advanced classes than white peers. Either out of overt racism or “liberal guilt,” Buck says white teachers did not hold black students to high expectations.”

Yet when black students are held to behavioral expectations or grades in order to get in AP classes, parents cry “racism”. You can’t have it both ways. (See the protests that Gwinnett county has “too many” black kids in trouble for behavior)

We do the same thing for poor kids, or kids from single parent homes, or sped kids. Feeling sorry for someone does not do them any favors. It is one thing to understand that this child or that child has a tough time. Virtually every kid, black or white, has something that interferes with their learning. Even rich kids are frequently “cursed” by their wealthly status.

I find it interesting that, in my travels, I have seen other cases of “acting white” syndrome, yet no people of other races were involved. What it tells me is, this is a UNIVERSAL problem, rather than related to American history.

catlady

February 27th, 2010
10:25 am

Everyone needs someone to look down on. If you are at the bottom of the list, you manufacture a way to look down on the ones “above” you.

James

February 27th, 2010
10:33 am

I think there that the idea of becoming less popular the better grades you have is more an issue of gender that of race. With girls, if you are pretty, it doesn’t matter if you are really smart or not, you will be popular, but typically the most popular boys, whether it is a predominantly “white” school or not, are the jocks. It is very seldom that your valedictorian and mathlete captain also are voted homecoming king or prom king. I think it would be an interesting research topic to see how many Prom Kings or Homecoming Kings were the valedictorian or saludatorian vs. Prom/Homecoming Queens were Val/saludatorian. I bet you would actually find that the percentages are the same at predominantly black schools vs. predominantly white ones.

pierre

February 27th, 2010
10:38 am

It looks like my comments didn’t show up, so I’ll try again. I think Buck has a historical point here, but the tragedy is that the wrongs suffered by the grandparents and parents of today’s black students have been internalized across the generations and have evolved into an deep and entrenched form of self-sabotage. As an educator I see it over and over again: the belligerent defense of one’s own ignorance; the retreat into a like-minded and hostile group of one’s own peers; the enormous insecurities and sense of inadequacy that feeds and compounds this hostility. All this seems to happen with the tacit acquiescence of the black community, and of course the ones really hurt by it are black students and the black community. Thus the cycle continues and the recriminations fly.

As an educator it is always frustrating, often sickening, to see. Yet as a white man I am not really allowed to voice this in the public arena. It seems no one really wants to talk about it and confront it. Remember what happened to Bill Cosby a number of years ago for raising this and a number of other points about problems in the black community? He was deemed not black enough (ie. acting and talking white) and therefore he was seen within his own (supposed) community as not having the right to speak to the issue.

A couple of other points. One: with some exceptions, the greater Atlanta area has undergone a de facto re-segregation of schools over the last 20 or so years–just go to something like greatschools.net to have a look at the racial breakdown of each school; however, twenty years on, I’m not sure this re-segregation has brought with it any renaissance of community and achievement in the overwhelmingly black schools and communities. Two: among the significant amount of black parents who want their children to achieve in the conventional academic sense so that their children will have a chance in an economy where more and more one has to have academic credentials to find a decent career, what schools do you think they move heaven and earth to have their children attend?

Maureen Downey

February 27th, 2010
10:40 am

Lee. Buck is from Arkansas and went to UGA for undergrad and Harvard for law. He is 35 with six kids, two of whom are adopted. Not sure why you are labeling him a liberal, politically correct Yankee. I have no idea of his politics based in either his book or my hour interview with him. So, how can you make that observation?
Maureen

AlreadySheared

February 27th, 2010
10:48 am

Pretty much ALL of the problems I experience in life are caused by outside factors that are simply beyond my control. This has both plusses and minuses.

On the minus side, this leads to tremendous frustration and anger on my part, along with some despair. Complain though I might, the outside factors that cause me so much trouble (history, society, the attitudes of others who refuse to change to make things better for me) are so massive and overwhelming that I can’t do anything about them.

However, on the plus side, since these factors simply WILL NOT YIELD to my desire for their change, there really isn’t anything I myself need to do to make my life better. It is, quite simply, out of my hands. All I can do is endure, suffer my lot in life, and hope/agitate for changes in these confining external factors so that things will be better for me.

Until that occurs, I’m not real happy about things. But on the other hand, I’m pretty much off the hook.

Philosopher

February 27th, 2010
10:58 am

Maureen, it’s simple…if you suggest that those less well-off than yourself may be held back or oppressed by anything other than their own doing, (or that, God forbid, white middle and upper class might have some culpability or a responsibilty to offer aid)you are a liberal.

Philosopher

February 27th, 2010
11:05 am

@AlreadySheared: All wrapped up in a nice little package…got it all figured out. How many years did it take to come up with that glorious epiphany? It’s great… leaves us with no responsibilty to deal with “them” and now we sleep well at night, knowing that “they” are content with their lot in life. Hmmmmm

James

February 27th, 2010
11:10 am

Maureen,

what do you think? Can you find out if there is any research on this already: The number of Valedictorians/Salutatorians who were also Homecoming/Prom King or Homecoming/Prom Queen and if there is a breakdown by race?

Please advise.

Maureen Downey

February 27th, 2010
11:11 am

James. I wil check, although I would be surprised to see any academic research. Purely observational, I have seen many homecoming/prom kings who were also the quarterbacks.
Maureen

Chris Murphy, Atlanta, GA

February 27th, 2010
11:13 am

@Patman: “Does anyone truly believe that those who are supposedly responsible for our issues are going to be the ones to resonve (sic) them? ” I have used the same rhetorical question in some discussions. But I didn’t see the study as pointedly ‘blaming’ whites, as recounting the historical steps that show the evolution of behavior, IMO.

Lee

February 27th, 2010
11:19 am

Maureen, I was incorrect when I called him a Yankee. The ultra-liberal, politically correct moniker still stands….

Lee

February 27th, 2010
11:20 am

BTW, politically correct has little to do with politics….

Lee

February 27th, 2010
11:28 am

Here we are almost 60 years after Brown vs. Board and people still tip toe around the race and IQ issue. Integration took a group of people with a mean IQ of 85 and dropped them into a academic setting with a group of people with a mean IQ of 100 and they wonder why it didn’t work out.

60 years later, we still talk about the black/white achievement gap. Folks like Mr. Buck blame it on whitey.

60 years ago, the not-so-politically-correct said that integration would ruin education for all. They knew that trying to educate two academically disparate groups was an exercise in futility. Here we are in 2010 with a perpetual “education crisis.”

Connect the dots.

Philosopher

February 27th, 2010
11:29 am

@Lee…so what?! Thank God for a few ultra liberals to balance the stingy, hard-hearted, self-absorbed ultra conservatives. Without them, the effects of segregation on anyone’s education wouldn’t even yet be an issue.

Dave

February 27th, 2010
11:36 am

Losing the Race by John McWhorter a good read on the subject.

eazye

February 27th, 2010
11:58 am

intergration in a sense was the worst thing to ever happen……..it was not natural.. it was “forced”..black people were “flim flammed, bamboozled, hoodwinked, whatever else u can say and tricked into believing that intergration would be better…….now u hardly have any black owned businesses, banks, gas stations, etc etc…..

asians, hispanics, and other groups are not concerned about intergration…..their communities are flourishing….why not black people??? hmmm? because of intergration……… as fred sandford would say “u big dummy”…….lol

and quit ending social experiments in schools……. its not abt educating kids anymore……. thats why the liberals dont want vouchers………some teachers teach cuz they cant get another job…. its a job of last resort…..and teachers dont wanna teach and kids dont wanna learn……. and black teachers already feel that cant teach and disciple black kids in the classroom so they give up and dont really wanna teach……

Marney

February 27th, 2010
12:02 pm

I would suggest the book. “Eight Habits of the Heart; the timeless values that build strong communities–within our homes and our lives.” by Clifton Taulbert. who also wrote “When We Were Colored” which was made into a movie some years back.

I think it is a reflection that affirms these ideas. They are not new observations, but maybe we need to have the discussion again.

Issue Zero

February 27th, 2010
12:07 pm

Nothing in education has the ability to bridge the achievement gap. No program, nor any amount of money can have demonstrable results until the rate of illegitimate births, and deadbeat dad-ism is brought into alignment with the general population. PERIOD

DAVID: AJC truth Detector

February 27th, 2010
12:22 pm

YOU CAN LAY THE BLAME FOR THE FAILURE OF MOSTLY BLACK SCHOOLS on LIBERALISM….the idiots in the LIBERAL EDUCATION SYSTEM

DAVID: AJC truth Detector

February 27th, 2010
12:24 pm

mr. BUCK………ALL THIS IS OLD KNOWLEDGE…..BEEN OUT THERE A LONG TIME

DAVID: AJC truth Detector

February 27th, 2010
12:31 pm

STEWART BUCK———YOU ARE SO FULL OF YOURSELF——BLAME IT ALL ON WHITEY

Philosopher

February 27th, 2010
12:36 pm

@ Lee: Since the goal of segregating schools should have been the abolishment of academic disparity, the dots lead to failure to meet that goal. If you are in actuality, talking about intellectual disparity, you are obligated to produce concrete evidence for such, or the dots lead, as I suspect they do, to ignorance, racism and bigotry…the real source of the failure to dissolve academic disparity.

the prof

February 27th, 2010
12:44 pm

Hmmmm……once again, I see BAD parenting (regardless of race) leading to BAD offspring.

ScienceTeacher671

February 27th, 2010
1:15 pm

Does Buck believe this is mainly a southern phenomenum, or does he think his findings are valid nationwide?

Are there similar things going on, say in the southwestern U.S. where there is traditional prejudice against Mexican-Americans, or in California where there has been oppression of Orientals?

susan

February 27th, 2010
1:16 pm

The problem facing a substantial number of blacks in the United States today is assimilation. The “acting white” epithet so common among many young blacks today — above all in the hypersegregated areas south of the Mason-Dixon line and in urban ghettos throughout the country — constitutes the rejection of belonging to a mainstream society which, in reality, is quite diverse, hyper competitive, and, despite everything, more open than its counterparts elsewhere in the developed and developing world.

History is far from irrelevant. After the Civil War, Reconstruction was sabotaged for political expediency. One hundred years later, legal desegregation was not accompanied by meaningful economic empowerment. Today, however, mainstream society has made way for a well-educated, assimilated black president (which is not to suggest that white nationalism and racism do not continue to be a powerful force, especially in the South).

Unless a credible, selfless black leadership emerges that stresses education and family stability as the keys to assimilation, black society as a whole will continue to suffer and grow relatively poorer in an economy defined by competition across national borders.

Lee

February 27th, 2010
1:21 pm

@Philosopher, “…ignorance, racism and bigotry…the real source of the failure to dissolve academic disparity.”

More blame whitey I see.

Blacks disparage other blacks by saying they are “acting white”, it is the fault of “ignorant, racist whites.”

Blacks go to the same schools, use the same textbooks, attend the same classes as their white counterparts, but yet still score lower on every metric (SAT, ACT, Graduation rate, CRCT, ad infinitum), it is the fault of “ignorant, racist whites.”

I really must buy me some of those rose colored glasses you wear.

I can say “rose colored” can’t I. I mean, MARTA named the Doraville line the “Yellow Line” and the Asians had a hissy fit.

Lord knows I don’t want to OFFEND anyone.

Oh wait, I said “Lord”. That might offend the athiests.

This politically correct crap is confusing. No wonder they screw everything up….

74Dawg

February 27th, 2010
1:22 pm

This may be true of some schools. However,In schools where I was growing up at the time, the formerly black schools,which were about the same age,were used . The principle of the black high school became Principal of the integrated Henry County high school,because he had seniority. There was violence and abuse directed at blacks at first,but that subsided and was not tolerated. As blacks became the majority for a while, the violence problems were on the other side-actual riots took place.
What happened,happened for the best,for all concerned,even with attendant problems. What that has to do with current black attitudes about “acting white”,I just don’t see. Wouldn’t cultural assimilation as with German,Irish ,Italian and others be another way to describe “acting white”,if by acting shite you mean speaking good English and trying to succeed?