Stop devaluing teachers and making them the scapegoat of CRCT investigation

Fayette County parent Kim Learnard set off a firestorm last year with her piece criticizing the new math.  Now, she has sent me a great piece she’s written about the CRCT investigation and what she considers the misguided spotlight on teachers at a time when teachers need more support than ever.  She’s a talented writer who does not pull any punches. Enjoy.

By Kim Learnard

If Georgia wants real learning to take place in  classrooms, then we will support our teachers more and our administrators less. When it comes to learning, nothing is more critical than the student-teacher relationship in the classroom.

Yet, Georgia’s educational culture places administrators at the pinnacle of education and devalues our single most valuable educational resource, our teachers.

Georgia boasts some of the best teacher education programs in the nation with qualified graduates emerging from excellent programs at UGA, Kennesaw, GSCU, Mercer and many more schools. Our well-educated, eager teachers find their way into Georgia classrooms and discover a dismal pay scale; furlough days; a statewide culture in which they rank at the bottom; and, hardly surprising under the circumstances, pervasive low morale.

Georgia fosters a top-heavy organizational structure that prioritizes administrators. Here in Fayette County (our state school superintendent’s home county) teachers have sustained a pay cut of 4.5 percent and taken three furlough days, with more sacrifices to come. At the same time, our county superintendent received a pay increase of 10 percent to more than $220,000 per year, plus benefits of which most working people in America can only dream.

We have 13 county administrators enjoying an annual salary of over $100,000 with no reductions in sight. How’s your workplace morale? Ask your child’s teacher that question. Then ponder what that means to your child’s learning in the classroom.

We have high level administrators to thank for Connected Math, a fuzzy math curriculum that still shows no evidence of success nearly five years after implementation. We have high level state administrators to thank for a mantra of “rigorous testing” with little substance to back it in the classroom. We have administrators to thank for CRCT tests that are so disconnected from the curricula that entire subject matter tests have had to be discarded, at tremendous cost.

We operate under the misguided notion that teachers are not trustworthy (but administrators are). State tests must be proctored by teachers who are then forbidden from looking at their students’ tests. One look at a completed test and a teacher can be accused of cheating, or worse. Our Legislature is actually discussing criminalizing teachers for such an act. This is a travesty.

We should be asking teachers to not only proctor state tests, but to review completed tests in peer groups in order to understand where both curricula and teaching methods could be improved. This information should then be shared with top level administrators, with the expectation that appropriate adjustments will be made statewide. Administrators should be taking their cues from teachers, not the other way around.

Georgia is now launching formal investigations into a statewide CRCT test cheating scandal. Using what resources? Shouldn’t these resources be spent educating our children? For the cost of an investigation, we could be funding education programs, improving teacher salaries, and assuring appropriate pay for the National Board Certified teachers who so richly deserve it.

Amid the wreckage, one small light flashed through the Georgia Legislature last week. Representative Ed Rynders (R-Albany) introduced a bill that bars school systems from using state funds to raise administrators’ pay at a time when the systems are furloughing teachers. This is the first step in the right direction –- let’s hope it is not the last.

The latest scandal is yet another in a mounting pile of evidence of Georgia’s misplaced priorities. Administrators do not impart knowledge in our students; teachers do. This is a clarion call for the immediate resignation of our state superintendent of schools; a paradigm shift to a teacher-centered educational system; and a culture of real learning for Georgia students.

78 comments Add your comment

V for Vendetta

February 24th, 2010
10:47 am

Bravo, Kim. Bravo.

Let’s put the focus back where it needs to be–the classroom.

And let’s legalize weed and end this budget crisis tomorrow. Just saying.

retired

February 24th, 2010
10:51 am

As a 32 year teaching veteran in Atlanta, Dekalb, and Clayton County schools, this person really wrote a good letter. I guess I was lucky I never worked with anyone I would have thought might cheat. All the teachers I worked with spent many extra hours tutoring children for no extra pay, took extra training, for no extra pay, and until wonderful Zell Miller, made the lowest of salaries, even in the southeast. I was proud to be among them!

D

February 24th, 2010
10:59 am

My view is teachers paid to much. Their union has done this at taxpayers expense. Their benefits are better than other civilian positions. They will note they can make more in private business but I have seen the return of teachers who have tried this to the teaching profession. I VOTE for charter schools. I bet I am not alone in this view.

Mac

February 24th, 2010
11:06 am

THERE IS NO UNION IN GEORGIA FOR TEACHERS!

How many times does this have to be said??!!

Write Your Board Members

February 24th, 2010
11:21 am

Great, great letter Kim.

Used to be Disgusted

February 24th, 2010
11:23 am

D: republican stupidity must be the only truly infinite force in the universe.

V for Vendetta

February 24th, 2010
11:31 am

D,

I’ll refrain from making easy jabs; however, I think for many of us it is not the pay that hurts so much as the disrespect and ill-treatment. There are few other professions where the employees are so casually dismissed and treated so abhorrently. I work for peanuts, but on top of that I have to put up with no administrative support, completely outdated technology, and gaggles of superiors who couldn’t tell you Pythagorean Theorem or the name of one of Shakespeare’s plays.

Considering the treatment, the paycheck only serves to remind me of how society values what we do–i.e., education.

Sick&Tired

February 24th, 2010
11:37 am

There is a great article today on CNN.com about “All teachers get pink slips at Rhode Island school” that is under performing. A total of 88 in all.

I don’t blame the teachers for all of the issues in education, but I am unhappy with some that I have come across in the last 8 years. The administration is definitely an issue and should be held accountable to the letter T. They are at the core of the problems in Georgia.

As a parent (with a career outside the home), I would be against teachers pay being affected by student performance. I have a 15 year old (A & B student) who doesn’t always perform at her highest level and I would hate to think about my raise or merit pay having to depend on anything that she does.

However, I do believe that we need to find a performance system that rates teachers and follows them throughout their career. It should definitely hold them accountable as far as promotions and anything that might be considered job perks. Teachers who are always rated low should be required to retrain and to team teach. If their skills do not improve they should be terminated or moved outside the classroom.

Maureen Downey

February 24th, 2010
11:42 am

Tony

February 24th, 2010
11:46 am

I am very short-tempered with my principal colleagues when I perceive the kinds of behavior Kim shares in her post. It is educational malpractice for school leaders to act like they have all the knowledge and power of how best to assure kids are learning. When administrators act as glorified policemen to make sure everyone has everything on the checklist rather than sitting down with teachers to discuss how to get resources and support, then he/she is NOT acting in the best interest of the children.

With that said, Kim is also painting with a broad brush. There are many, many principals and central office leaders who are dedicated to making sure children have the best opportunities for learning. These leaders support teachers, children and parents in their quest to perform better.

There are some teachers and some principals that should not be in their current positions. I work hard to make sure all our students have the best.

ga

February 24th, 2010
11:48 am

Vouchers for all!! That’s the solution! This way the TEACHERS CAN choose which admins they want to work for and students and parents can choose the school

Teacher&mom

February 24th, 2010
12:07 pm

Thank you Ms. Learnard. I hope that those with the power to make true changes in Georgia’s educational system will read this with an open mind. Our country and state are caught up in a modern-day witch hunt. The teaching profession is daily “burned at the stake.” I truly appreciate your courage in speaking up.

catlady

February 24th, 2010
12:14 pm

sick and tired; They are moved outside the classroom–into administration! A great letter, kim!

d2

February 24th, 2010
12:17 pm

Just saying I used to be d until this Idiot D stole my name. D is just shooting through the hips. It is just like the same people want vouchers are the same one who resent taxes. They don’t mind taking vouchers (money from taxes) and get a discount from a private school. I am for vouchers as long as the students who recieve them have to take CRCT’s, EOCT, and the teachers have to be certified in the area they teach through the state of Georgia. If the QBE formula is cut so should the vouchers. I mean lets level the playing field. Also the private school that receives the vouchers must accept every kid that can afford it. Teachers in this state are some of the hardest working people. They are suppose to be a counselor, teacher, friend, and mentor. They have to deal with children from all walks of life with all backgrounds. They have to deal with parents who wonder why their children are not angels at school. The state also just decides to cut more and more. I know when the CRCT is going on, the least on their mind is I guess I need to change answers. Most teachers are thinking about the lesson plans and how much work they can leave at school and how much work they have to take home. Most teachers don’t have time to sit down and wonder which ones need to be erased. The poor students have to answer the stupid questions that are out to trick what you know-not what you know. Some have erased a complete row because they were off by one number on the scan tron- does that mean the teacher was cheating. Some how people need to understand what goes on everyday at school. Shooting off about unions that don’t exist, are automatically accussing teachers of cheating when they don’t have time to even think about it, vouchers for a discount for the rich all irks me. I wish people on this blog would use common sense instead of saying things they no nothing about. If you critize me because of the typos then you missed the points.

Dr. John Trotter

February 24th, 2010
12:18 pm

Teachers do indeed rank at the bottom of the pecking order. I remember the days when the teachers were Queens and Kings of their classrooms. Administrators were there to support the teachers. As an administrator, I thought that it was my job to esteem and respect the teacher and the teacher’s judgment, wisdom, and discretion on how he or she ran his or her classroom. I did not snoopervise. In fact, as an administrator in a high school and a middle school, I NEVER wrote up a teacher. My philosophy was this (learned, of course, from my father who was an administrator for many years in Georgia schools): If I have to put something in writing about your performance, this is the first little step toward documenting for a termination or non-renewal. I few teachers would, as humans, goof up occasionally and do some things that they wish they had not done, but a gentle and private talk behind closed doors allowed the teacher to save face and did wonders for his or her morale.

Administration went from support to snoopervision. This began to happen in Georgia especially with the passage of the Quality Basic Education Act (QBE) in 1985. I used to tell the politicians at the time that QBE stood for Quit Being an Educator. It has contributed greatly to the ruination of public education here in Georgia. No, it is not the teachers’ fault. Structurally, it formally came about with QBE. The evaluative program established with the enabling legislation of QBE made it so easy for imbecilic and moronic administrators to simply mess with teachers all day long. Bureaucracy is the game played in the public schooling process. It is the dominant game. Everything is CYA. (c) MACE, February 24, 2010

what's right for kids???

February 24th, 2010
12:19 pm

Bill

February 24th, 2010
12:27 pm

Hey “Mac,” What did your type of “union” do for the fired Rhode Island teachers? You don’t know what you are talking about when it comes to “unions.” I taught in Michigan for 18 years before moving south. We had the type of “union” by which you seem to be so mesmerized. It was affiliated with NEA. Nothing. Same ole same ole. Shop stewards co-opted by the administration. When I started teaching in Georgia just four years ago, one of my new collegues told me about MACE. I have never been happier with any group! Totally aggressive in its representation and defense of teachers. They always return your calls…and I mean promptly! Quite frankly, I wish that we had had a group/union like MACE when I taught in Michigan! I love MACE! Check it out at http://www.theteachersadvocate.com

Mac

February 24th, 2010
12:38 pm

Bill – WTH are you talking about? GA does not have a teacher’s union. When did I ever say I was enamored or memorized of any unions? Teachers do not have any bargaining power in this state. PAGE and GAE are not unions in this state. I appreciate what MACE tries to do as an advocate for teachers in some respects but they aren’t a union.

crazy much?

historydawg

February 24th, 2010
1:11 pm

ga, the reasons vouchers are moronic is because public education in a republic/democracy was designed to serve communities, not self-interest. the only choice involved with vouchers is available for certain groups to CHOOSE to avoid the neighbors they don’t like and CHOOSE to reject their responsibility to the future of our republic/democracy. vouchers, or (as the law as it is rewritten and ms. downey refuses to report on) “Early HOPE” as Moody and Balfout will call it, will not serve the intention of the Georgia constitution and will only encourage segregation, both religious, racial, and classist. kudos, to a solid assessment of Georgia’s education problems, kim. Keep watch as the vouchers/choice/competition advocates eliminate public education’s ability to function by holding it accountable to measures that can only mandate failure, as the DOE and segregation academies swell, leaving Georgia’s children behind.

Jackie Moon

February 24th, 2010
1:15 pm

I think that the lack of a teacher union in the state of Georgia might be the problem. A lot of teachers in this state will not speak up because they are afraid they might lose their job. A good teacher union would empower more teachers to speak up. That would help to bring more ideas, teaching strategies, resources, etc. into Georgia. When you give someone a lot of power it is often misused. Take some of the power away from the administrators and give it back to the teachers.

djm

February 24th, 2010
1:21 pm

Kim is right. I’m a high school teacher. Fifteen years ago I taught kids how to analyze an issue and evaluate situations. Today I am a trainer who feeds them bits and pieces of U. S. History so they can pass an End of Course Test written by a corporation in another state. In addition I am not supposed to ever look at the test or get any feed back from my students post test. Does this sound right to anybody with a brain. We need help.

DawgDad

February 24th, 2010
1:22 pm

“Our well-educated, eager teachers find their way into Georgia classrooms and discover a dismal pay scale; furlough days; a statewide culture in which they rank at the bottom;”

I believe this statement to be materially incorrect.

My daughter is a state employee in a different department; it has been communicated to her teachers are a higher priority, and she has been told to expect about four times as many furlough days as stated here for teachers. The cultural statement, in my opinion, is BS.

Clay

February 24th, 2010
1:30 pm

Am I the only one sick and tired of hearing teachers complain about thier low pay? Quit and find something else if you’re unhappy! No one is making you teach. You should have become a teacher because you love teaching and you love children–not because you wanted to get rich.

Here in my Gwinnett County schools, every time I go into the parking lots I see row after row of Mercedes, Volvos, Acuras, Suburbans and so on. I see sindow stickers for places like Amelia Island on the rear windows. Teachers don’t seem to be that poorly paid to me.

Liberal Teacher

February 24th, 2010
1:32 pm

God Bless You Dr. Trotter. True understanding… In order for education to work, the teacher has to believe in the mission of the admin, and the admin has to trust the teachers. More often, there is this divide where teachers distrust the motives of the admin (sometimes for good reason); and the admin is condescending towards the teachers (sometimes for good reasons). Admin now sabotage teachers, and teachers sabotage admin in return. This is part of the problem of why some schools can not meet standards.
Its not the kids, its the teachers/admin playing cops and robbers… Its a power play.

DAVID: AJC truth Detector

February 24th, 2010
1:33 pm

REALLY NOTHING NEW…..LEARNED HERE….THE TOP SETS THE RULES…SETS THE PAY SCALE…..TALENT RISES TO THE TOP….TOP GET TOP $$$…..HAS ALWAYS BEEN..WILL ALWAYS BE..

PR

February 24th, 2010
1:33 pm

Dawgdad, I know that teachers in Henry County will be forced to endure 8 furlough days next year. I find it hard to believe that other state agencies will have to take 32 furlough days.

A dose of reality

February 24th, 2010
1:43 pm

Let’s get really serious here for a moment- Is anyone actually under the delusion that the vast majority of educators are the best and brightest students coming out of college? Certainly there are exceptions, but for the most part, individuals graduating with education degrees are doing so because they couldn’t hack it in any of the other degree programs offered at their university. There isn’t any incentive for highly intelligent and gifted individuals to choose a career as an educator. The bottom line is that the majority of teachers people who wouldn’t have graduated college had it not been for the all-too-easy opportunity to obtain an education degree.

Reality

February 24th, 2010
1:44 pm

The key to education is parents first, then teachers. No where is administration.

Back in “Little House on the….” there was not one administrator in the classroom, right? When and how did their role become so big?

The answer is one of legal. Some where, some parent sued a teacher for some likely non-sense – and boom! The idea of an administrator “taking care of things” was born.

If parents and teachers can work together and trust each other AND do their part, then no administrator is needed at all, even in a large school.

However, administrators have INGRAINED themselves in our education. At least, we should minimize their activities and authority. Along with that should be reducing their pay. Most of them that I know only became administrators to ‘get out of the classroom’ and/or ‘for the power.’

OVERTAXED

February 24th, 2010
1:52 pm

Okay teachers. The State Revenue Commish is impeding sales tax being collected and is trying to block effort to work with local government in regard to business license and sales tax. Come up with a solution to get these much needed sales tax and you won’t have to worry anymore.

Liberal Teacher

February 24th, 2010
1:53 pm

A Dose of Reality-
That is a horrible thing to assume. I agree there are too many going into the profession who could not hack it elsewhere but the GACE, and the PRAXIS takes care of many of them. Please do not promote ignorance. I majored in History and graduated w/from a well known school in the top of my class. I chose teaching as a career because I enjoyed working w/children. Many of the teachers at my school are very intelligent and knowledgeable in their fields.
Lets have a real conversation, not one filled w/general insulting comments.
Thanks.

conservative democrat

February 24th, 2010
1:53 pm

No administrator in any school should be paid more than the highest paid teacher in that school system. If this were the law (it’s actually the opposite), then we would show teachers that we do indeed value their profession. The administrators are glorified cops and accountants and they should be paid accordingly. They are not CEOs. Yet, they are being paid as if they create jobs in the community. They do not and as a rule should be compensated for the support role they provide and no more. Not only does this system send the wrong message, it also takes our best and brightest teachers and turns them into administrators for the additional pay. Right on target, Kim!!!

devildawg

February 24th, 2010
1:54 pm

It all starts at the top. Sonny Perdue and Kathy Cox are disasters when it comes to doing what this state really needs for education. The county superintendents and school administrators are doing what they are told so that they don’t lose their jobs, and the teachers are following suit. I agree that a teacher’s union would be great if it was structured correctly, but being in Georgia, you never know. As a music educator, I have to put up with GMEA, the state’s music educator’s association. What a joke. No statewide standards for performing arts, and no statewide accountability. Why does South Carolina have standards for marching band, dance, orchestra, chorus, and all the other arts, and have statewide competitions, but Georgia is scared to? Because it would expose all the good ole boys who are coasting by year after year with mediocre results. Tear it up and start over.

d2

February 24th, 2010
1:59 pm

I guess when all else fails blame the teacher. By the way, I don’t know where you see all those expensive cars at. But even if a teacher drives one, maybe their spouse is aying for it. It seems to me everyone is side tracking from the issues. Everyone attacks the teacher–I guess that makes the problem solved. I know several teachers who are not complaining about their jobs, they are complaining becuase everyone accuses them of things beyond their control. Those who think that graduating as an educator is for those who can’t hack it in anything else–I love to see these people take the certification tests. Teachers happen to be some of the most knowledgeable people around. That’s like saying people who blog have nothing else to do right–isn’t that right– Dose of Reality—Please folks thank a teacher if you can read….

Elizabeth

February 24th, 2010
2:03 pm

Clay,

When the economy picks up, you will gewt your wish. There will be a massive teacher shortage in this state. You will be liucky to find high school graduates to babysit the kids. Believe it. It will happen.

RickinATL

February 24th, 2010
2:10 pm

Having sat in committee meetings with many an Atlanta Public School administrator and seen how little they actually produce for their fat salaries, I’m in total agreement that administration is top-heavy and teachers deserve more respect and more money. But Ms. Learnard, you weaken your argument dramatically by downplaying the seriousness of the cheating scandal. In the APS, there is massive evidence of the largest cheating scandal in standardized testing history. Any teachers who were involved need to be fired. Period. (That goes for admins too–in fact, I’ll raucously celebrate the firing of any administrator who condoned or participate in the cheating). Get rid of the rotten apples first, then we can talk about changing the org chart, okay?

RJ

February 24th, 2010
2:16 pm

@dose, if you feel that way I am assuming that you homeschool. BTW, I don’t have a degree in education; I took education courses so that I would be able to teach. I’m glad I did. Regardless of how difficult my job can be, I know I am making a difference in a child’s life.

Dan

February 24th, 2010
2:24 pm

Hard to argue about the top heavy political nature of education administration, but I would like to know by what measure the author deems our teachers such a valuable resource? One of the ongoing political arguments is teacher evaluation and compensation, so if Ms Learnard has a proven method she should share. (I suspect measuring the excellance of the teaching schools would be similarly useful information)

foomanchoo

February 24th, 2010
2:25 pm

Wow Maureen, way to let someone else write your column for you! And they pay you for this?

Dan

February 24th, 2010
2:27 pm

Now before the hollering starts I believe good teachers are a huge resource and incredibly influential. I just don’t think there are many of those. Just as there are few at the top of their field in any profession

A dose of reality

February 24th, 2010
2:32 pm

RJ- If you actually are making a difference, you’ll more than likely find yourself looking for a job sooner than later. In order to make a difference under the current educational system, nearly every rule has to be broken.

We actually send ours to a private school that requires their educators to have experience beyond a 4 year degree. Whether you realize it or not, a 4 year degree today is about the equivalent of a high school diploma 15 years ago. Students entering college are so far behind due to lack of education they are receiving, professors are spending the better part of the 4 years developing skills that should have been learned in middle and high school. In my opinion, the solution is to privatize the educational system, heavily scrutinize teacher performance, and eliminate “no child left behind”. Administrators should be replaced with more business-minded individuals instead of the current “former teacher pipeline” model. They are not equipped with the skills to adequately lead and develop a talented, efficient, and effective workforce. Furthermore, without some type of consequences for sub-par performance in the classroom, teachers will continue to under-deliver and students will continue to under-perform.

One brain cell

February 24th, 2010
2:35 pm

Clay,

Those cars belong to the students. I’m not an American citizen but I do know that this is a capitalistic country. One aspect of capitalism is competitive pay to attract the best (maybe it is the most important aspect). Why is this okay for every job in this country but not for teachers? Is it a reflection of how the people in this state value education?

Maureen Downey

February 24th, 2010
2:37 pm

foomanchoo, Let’s see. I have written 20 entries on the blog in my past three days of work. And that includes putting out the education page for the print edition, which entails writing a column, finding and editing an op-ed column and editing 44 inches of letters. And I covered three press conferences in that time.
I think the paper gets their money’s worth.
Trust me, I have many faults, but productivity has never been one of them.
Maureen

Ryan

February 24th, 2010
2:38 pm

My children will never see the inside of a public school. 80% of public school teachers are shouldn’t be in the classroom. Most of the teachers I know couldn’t succeed in the business world so they went to teaching. Teaching is seen as a fall back profession for those who don’t know what else to do. I went to school and got an education degree but have not stepped foot in a school since. I learned all I need to learn about the public schools and teachers during my hours spent as a student teacher. If you want more money go to a career that rewards competition and excellence.

Tired of BS

February 24th, 2010
2:42 pm

While it is true that not “all” teachers are bad, there is mounting evidence that many are worse than bad. Administrators are very top heavy in education, they are a large reason schools are failing.

The emphasis in education has moved away from reading, writing, geography, history, and arithmatic. The new focus is on getting every federal government dollar possible from every student enrolled. Pre-school/Afterschool daycare, Pre-K, WIC, ADHD/ADD/Speical needs funds are skyrocketing. School systems are more concerned with making sure children have enough information on sex, gay family lifestyles, black history month, and a variety of other social issues…. you name it and it is in the schools. Too little emphasis is placed on teaching.

When my child was in school we had numerous issues with poor teachers. Because I had a child who was one of the best and brightest I made sure she was educated in spite of them.

td

February 24th, 2010
2:47 pm

A dose of reality, I am a conservative and believe in the free enterprise system but you have to be kidding me with wanting what we currently have as leaders in business to run our school system. You would like the same people that gave us the banking crisis and ruin most of corporate America in the past 10 years could run our school system?

Betty Boop

February 24th, 2010
2:50 pm

Amen on the admin problem. In my system, most of the admins are, at best, mediocre in the classroom, BUT….they are great at schmoozing, drinking and partying with the BOE and other powers that be, or they are family members. Most of them couldn’t teach their way out of a paper bag, nevermind manage a classroom and actually teach anything.

And…is there a formula for how many admins are needed, based on student population count? What about Guidance Counselors? formula for that? We have 4 people working in a single A school. THAT is ridiculous.

A dose of reality

February 24th, 2010
2:53 pm

TD- I didn’t say anything about current business leaders running the school system. My point is that we need business minded individuals- not educators- running the school system. You have to start somewhere, and placing some savvy business leaders who have an interest in salvaging the education system in leadership positions to get the ball rolling is a good place to start. From there, you start recruiting from the top B-schools to bring in talent to continue to develop and lead the project as it is rolled out to the districts across the country.

AWJ

February 24th, 2010
3:08 pm

*********************
A dose of reality

February 24th, 2010
1:43 pm

Let’s get really serious here for a moment- Is anyone actually under the delusion that the vast majority of educators are the best and brightest students coming out of college? Certainly there are exceptions, but for the most part, individuals graduating with education degrees are doing so because they couldn’t hack it in any of the other degree programs offered at their university. There isn’t any incentive for highly intelligent and gifted individuals to choose a career as an educator. The bottom line is that the majority of teachers people who wouldn’t have graduated college had it not been for the all-too-easy opportunity to obtain an education degree.
*********************************************

Are you serious? Really?? I have two(2) BBAs from UGA in Finance and Management Information Systems, with a 3.5 GPA. I decided to get my M.Ed. to teach business and technology, because it better suited me.

Your post has to be the most ignorant laughable post I have read on the AJC, maybe ever. If anyone does not understand why teachers are fed up with not being respected (among other things)read dose’s post…

I hope you made that post as a joke……

Reality

February 24th, 2010
3:09 pm

For people to come on this board and bash teachers for their pay is astonishing. The problem with this country and our schools is an entire “me” attitude. “Well if I am hurting than why aren’t they?” That is the attitude of a generation of spoiled brats who have never really produced anything anyway (see Generation Zero Documentary) Teachers who complain about pay are really saying that they do far more than just teach, they spend hours at home grading papers, tutoring underachieving students after school, and lesson planning. Teachers are undercontract for the days that they work not for the hours. Most complainers on this board cannot imagine teaching their own child much less being measured by 105 students’ performance on a standardized test that wasn’t even made by teachers. How many of those students in Atlanta’s parents could pass the CRCT for their own child? How many spend just 30 minutes a night reviewing their Math facts? How many know what the heck a standard is much less what their child’s standards are? For those who bash teachers I suggest you walk your sorry tail into your child’s school and hangout there for about 5 hours. Teach 11 year olds the difference between Parliamentary Democracy and Presidential Democracy, develop in them an understanding of Gross Domestic Product with the investment in human capital by 1st world nations, and later in the day explain the different phases of the moon. Teach them HOW TO READ! I bet you are the same parent who expects their kid to start at QB, play Shortstop, Point Guard, have the solo in the musical, be the main actor / actress and when it does not happen goes on the Sports Vent or straight to the Administration without discussing problems with the coach, sponsor, or teacher. This is a complete joke because the parents are a joke. Entitlement. Entitlement. Entitlement. Ask any teacher and they will tell you that the student is a direct reflection of their parenting and LACK OF.
The teachers in Georgia have not formed a Union like they do in Mass. or New York; they have never threatened to walk out of classrooms like pilots, air traffic controllers, or plant workers. This state’s problems reside with the greedy bankers, investors, lawmakers, developers, and builders who for a decade tried to make a lifetime’s profit. The same people that come on this board and challenge teachers to solve the very problems that THEY CREATED and then mock their ignorance. Here is the definition of ignorance: greedily build two decades worth of housing and sell it to people with little to no credit history, approve new neighborhoods to every developer wanting to make another easy million, build a bank upon loans that are granted to people who 30 years ago could not get a loan. That is ignorance. By the way, Overtaxed, the challenges of state and local governments in our current situation are a direct reflection of local “lack of” leadership and their refusal to say NO to local projects and their ignorance in dealing with short term problems. (THE WATER CRISIS) That lasted all of one year. Maybe they should have paid attention in school or to their parents. Its called a budget and if the funds are not there then DON’T SPEND IT!

Ryan

February 24th, 2010
3:14 pm

AWJ – Your post has to be the most ignorant laughable post I have read on the AJC, maybe ever. I hope you made that post as a joke……

A dose of reality is dead on. You need to learn to deal with it.