Nearly 11,000 seek early admission to UGA: 6,000 find out today that they made the

Having gone through this twice in the last four years, I know parents and teens are anxious about getting into UGA. Congratulations to those who are admitted to UGA early action. To those who don’t get good news this afternoon, let’s hope for a better outcome in a few months.

From UGA:

For some 6,000 high school seniors, the holidays will be off to a happy start when they learn they have been offered early admission to the University of Georgia. Those who applied for “early-action” admission to UGA will learn their status when decision letters arrive by mail starting next week

But those who don’t want to wait can get the news online after 4:30 p.m. by using the password-protected status check on the admissions office Website.

The admissions office received some 10,600 early-action applications this year. Many of the applicants not offered admission at this point will learn that a final decision has not yet been made. They are asked to submit additional information by the regular-decision deadline of Jan. 15.

“We always try to stress to early-action applicants that if their admission decision was deferred, they still have a chance to be part of the incoming freshman class,” said Nancy McDuff, associate vice president for admissions and enrollment management.

“Last year, we admitted about half of the students who were initially deferred and the completed part II of the application by the regular-decision deadline of Jan 15.”

UGA initiated a non-binding early-action program in 2003. Those applying for early-action submit applications by an Oct. 15 deadline and learn in December that they were admitted, denied or deferred. Early-action decisions are made strictly on academic criteria.

McDuff believes that more students this year decided to wait to apply until the regular-decision deadline in order to have additional factors considered, such as high school activities and volunteer work. “For some students, that’s a good decision,” she said.

This year’s early-action applicant pool is again academically stronger and more diverse than the previous year, continuing a trend of the past few years, according to McDuff. Nearly 23 percent of the students applying for early-action identified themselves as being from an ethnic or racial minority group.

More than 750 early-action applications, representing over seven percent of the total pool, were received from African Americans.The number of early-action applications from Hispanic students totaled more than 400 students, an increase from last year.

Due to the increase in the academic quality of the applicants, about 300 more early-action students are being offered admission this year than last. McDuff predicted that the admissions office will receive between 17,000 and 18,000 total applications for the incoming class, with a target enrollment of 4,800 new first-year students entering this summer or fall and another 200 in spring 2011.

Typically, about half the students offered admission go on to enroll at UGA, a comparable yield to other selective universities.

“The odds of being offered admission are always driven by how strong a student looks relative to the rest of the applicant pool,” McDuff said. “The first offers of admission are extended to students with the strongest academic records, but the most important factors in the regular-decision process are also academic—in particular grade point average and the rigor of the courses that the students have taken relative to what is available in their school. However, regular-decision applications and applications from students deferred from the early-action program are given a holistic review that includes other factors that tell us about students’ talents and activities outside the classroom.”

The students who applied early this year are academically quite strong, McDuff said.

Those offered admission at this point have an average academic GPA mid-range of 3.84-4.08, an SAT mid-range of 1240-1390 (with a mean SAT writing score of 654) or a mean ACT range of 28-32. UGA requires students to submit writing scores for their ACT and SAT tests and those scores are an integral part of the selection process, McDuff said.

Those students admitted through early action also took an average of six Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate classes.

46 comments Add your comment

Lee

December 11th, 2009
9:39 am

“This year’s early-action applicant pool is again academically stronger and more diverse than the previous year, continuing a trend of the past few years, according to McDuff. Nearly 23 percent of the students applying for early-action identified themselves as being from an ethnic or racial minority group. More than 750 early-action applications, representing over seven percent of the total pool, were received from African Americans. The number of early-action applications from Hispanic students totaled more than 400 students, an increase from last year.”

More politically correct BS. Why does this matter?

Mishap

December 11th, 2009
10:55 am

Lee,

It matters b/c UGA is traditionally one of the least diverse institutions out there. Up until a few years ago it was something like 90% White (still over 80%) which doesn’t exactly match the demographics of the US much less GA. It’s not an issue of affirmative action or trying to take seats from qualified White kids but rather the most qualified students being turned off from going there. Top private schools are closer to 60% White which while still not exactly matching the country’s demographics, the increased diversity tends to be inviting to both US born and international students. Consider that Florida is only 60% White and enjoys measurably more competitive entrance statistics and can be more selective in admissions.

When my brothers and I were looking at colleges, none of us considered UGA at all simply b/c it wasn’t inviting to us as Chinese-Americans. This despite our parents having met there as grad students and us spending much of our early lives out there. Georgia Tech/Emory were considerations as were top private schools that didn’t have the negative good ‘ole boy attitudes that we enjoyed so much going to HS in Snellville. UGA would have been effectively free given our grades and SAT scores but we (and most of our Asian peers in HS) chose schools that were more competitive academically and brought in people from around the world rather than the best the HOPE scholarship has to offer.

http://www.onlineathens.com/stories/033008/uganews_2008033000416.shtml

Real

December 11th, 2009
11:16 am

Alot of kids apply for UGA because they want to party and half have a hard time finishing school because all they do is party in Athens and not study. Georgia has other flag ship schools that produce very good graduates and half the time an employer would take a student from Georgia State, Southern Poly and Georgia Tech before a UGA grad. UGA is not ranked higher than University of Florida, Auburn University, Vanderbilt or LSU in education so why does the AJC make it a big deal on admissions days?????????????????????

Dave

December 11th, 2009
11:28 am

Real: Thanks for the biased, fiction-based and totally incorrect post. Next time, please do your research before you give a statement such as this. Have you even done any review of the rankings in US News & World Report, Money, or Kiplinger’s? How about the graduation rates, rates of HOPE continuation, freshman retention rates, etc. of students at UGA? I have family members who have attended a number of the other schools you have mentioned, and I think all of them have their own strengths and positive points. But to bash UGA based upon false information is just plain sad.

And as to why AJC makes a big deal about it, I am guessing it is due to all the high school students (and their parents) in GA that care about this issue!

Mishap

December 11th, 2009
11:30 am

Lee,
It matters b/c UGA’s relative lack of diversity is limiting the school and not helping it. You’re not talking about affirmative action and taking away seats for qualified White students. Minorities that are equally or better qualified are choosing to go elsewhere b/c they find the environment which was almost 90% White a few years ago (still over 80% today) wasn’t culturally inviting.

A lot of top private schools have double the number of minorities (Harvard has ~40%) and it hasn’t hurt them academically. Instead the diversity is a benefit and students come from around the country/world to work w/ the best and the brightest. Even University of Florida has a similar mix and as a result they have measurably higher SAT/GPA requirements and can be more selective on admissions.

If a school looks nothing like the state of GA, then what validity can its education be on a national stage? If the best and brightest high schoolers all leave GA despite the huge HOPE incentives, then what does that say for our eventual workforce?

Dawg Foot

December 11th, 2009
11:31 am

Real = someone who tried and did not get into UGA

Dawg Foot

December 11th, 2009
11:37 am

Minorities at Harvard = Asians

Czan

December 11th, 2009
11:40 am

Lee -
I concur with Mishap. We’re not talking about trying to find unqualified minority candidates as some token act. There a plenty of qualified applicants from under-represented backgrounds that are choosing to go to school elsewhere because they don’t feel comfortable at UGA. And of course that’s the case with plenty of students across the spectrum, but it’s particularly troubling in a state that has a wealth of qualified minority students that are making an informed choice to NOT apply to one of the state’s flagship schools.

But to be fair to UGA, the fact that this state has a plethora of strong HBCU’s in the area, probably makes it more challenging than in other states.

Fake

December 11th, 2009
11:57 am

Real,

So, a half the time employers pick applicants from GSU, Ga Souther, etc. before UGA. So, that means, a half of the time they DO pick an applicant from UGA first. That seems to be a pretty good stat for UGA…

Mishap

December 11th, 2009
12:04 pm

Dawg Foot,

Asians = 1/3 of the world’s population so maybe they’re looking to the best/brightest everywhere vs. getting a campus where everyone looks the exact same.

It’s not a perfect indicator but notice which way the better schools skew:
http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-colleges/national-campus-ethnic-diversity

Lee

December 11th, 2009
12:12 pm

Diversity is a benefit, blah, blah, blah.

Hey, if you want to accept the best and brightest, then take the Ethnicity box off the application. That way, you only grade on the academic strengths of the student.

But no, universities have fought long and hard to keep affirmative action in place. UGA is no exception, as evidenced by the admissions department bragging about the increased number of AA and hispanic applicants.

Mishap

December 11th, 2009
12:34 pm

Lee,

I could see it being a problem if UGA was destroying its student base to let in unqualified minorities but that’s not really the case. As the school’s diversity has gone up so has its academic standing. I had a higher SAT score in the 7th grade than the average UGA student in ‘94. Back then the school was significantly less diverse but it was hardly the Harvard of the south.

Diversity for the sake of diversity is a bit pointless but being a homogeneous campus probably wasn’t helping in recruiting top students when the area is largely rural and away from things that students from other areas may be looking for.

Lynn

December 11th, 2009
12:38 pm

Lee – UGA and other public institutions are not allowed to consider the ethnic background of a student when offering admissions. Private institutions still have that option. The restriction on considering ethnic background has decreased the number of minorities applying to UGA and the subsequent admissions. All groups compete on the same criteria.

Corn Cobb Transplant

December 11th, 2009
12:45 pm

As a out of state transplant to Cobb county, I’m often surprised at the attention UGA gets. The school certainly is getting better and HOPE helps a lot but imo, it’s still not at the point at which many top students will think seriously about going there.

From personal experience, at my son’s high school, out of the top 100 kids, maybe only half actually apply to UGA and even less actually enroll with most aiming for out of state schools. Among a large segment of the student and adult population in particular, UGA has a reputation as a legacy university where students go because their parents went and so on. Make no mistake, UGA attracts bright kids but oftentimes not the brightest kids because of its perceived image as a deeply rooted “Georgia” school. I would not be surprised if in other areas with large numbers of transplants, this is the case as well.

Ole Guy

December 11th, 2009
12:48 pm

Real, are you for real? Just exactly what would have you thinking that kids at UGA would party more and study less than their counterparts at any of the other fine schools you have listed? As to the relative rankings of these institutions, I, and I am quite certain the readers of this forum, would request that you share your sources of information. I could be wrong, however, I honestly do not believe the AJC is “making a big deal” on these issues common to any collegiate admissions event. One would suspect that, at some point in your collegiate quest, you yourself may have “drawn the short stick”. Don’t worry, Real, every college town has bars!

[...] More here: Nearly 11000 seek early admission to UGA: 6000 find out today that … [...]

Let's be honest

December 11th, 2009
1:54 pm

Let’s be honest. For a large percentage of HS students thinking about going to college, athletic programs (football & basketball)are more important than academics.

Dawg Foot

December 11th, 2009
1:57 pm

Tiger Woods is trying to make a lot of black children to even out the percentages at Stanford.

jim d

December 11th, 2009
2:33 pm

Dawg,

1/4 black

AlreadySheared

December 11th, 2009
4:50 pm

Hey, my niece graduated from UGA. She’s a good person, and I still like her.

SOMEBODY’s gotta go there.

real

December 11th, 2009
6:10 pm

Dawg Foot = dummy who probably does not have a college education or a degree from UGA…lol but actuallY i was accepted to all the schools in GA, FL and Bama…think there are more important issues that readers want to hear about other than UGA. A UGA education and an education from Vanderbilt or UF cant be compared in academics or Football…lol

http://www.forbes.com/lists/2009/94/colleges-09_Americas-Best-Colleges_Rank.html

real

December 11th, 2009
6:20 pm

Ole Guy, just look at the number of kids that are arrested for underage possession of alcahol in Athens every month who are students at UGA and compare that number to school of similar size schools such as Auburn & UF and you get your awnser….also look at the graduation rate…is poor compared to other SEC school and kids can go to UGA and major in Sports Studies….

real

December 11th, 2009
6:43 pm

Dave, everybody in the state of Georgia knows that an education from UGA is not highly regarded when you compare it to an education from schools that are more academically challenging. Emory, Georgia Tech, Georgia state have high admission standards too and they should get some action in the AJC…AJC makes it seem like everybody wants to go to UGA when thats not the case…there are more schools that are educating kids at a more successful rate than Georgia.

http://www.topuniversities.com/university-rankings/world-university-rankings/2009/results

heeldawg

December 11th, 2009
7:31 pm

Real:

Your handle is clearly a misnomer, as there is nothing “real” about the misinformation contained in your posts. You say that Georgia is not as highly regarded as Tech, Auburn, etc. and that employers would often rather hire someone from Georgia State or “other schools.” You offer no data to back this statement up–because those data don’t exist.

There is no doubt that Emory offers students a good education. Georgia Tech, as well, is a viable option for those students interested in Engineering or other similar disciplines. But the majority of Emory’s students are from out of state. Tech’s narrower curriculum and smaller student body limit its impact on the collegiate admissions pool in the state; some kids just aren’t a good fit for Tech (i.e. kids interested in the humanities, etc.). But Georgia’s a far better academic school than Georgia Southern, Georgia State, Mercer, Berry, Georgia College, Shorter, Armstrong, Columbus College, Valdosta State, etc. In fact, it’s a far better academic school than any other SEC school except for Vanderbilt and Florida. It far outclasses Auburn and Alabama, who admit thousands of students that U.Ga. doesn’t every year. As the state’s flagship university, its depth and breadth of academic offerings far exceed those of any other school in Georgia–Emory and Tech included. And with the HOPE scholarship, it is a bargain.

As the state’s largest nationally-competitive university, the early decision day information for U.Ga. is big news to thousands of Georgia high schoolers. So, yes, this does warrant coverage in the AJC.

Hate to break it to you, buddy, but The University of Georgia is the source of undergraduate education for most of the state’s physicians, attorneys, teachers, veterinarians, businessmen, and other professionals. And you know what? Given the larger size of the student body and the average SAT/GPA scores, a greater absolute number of academically outstanding students (1400+ SAT, 3.9 or greater GPA)go to The University of Georgia than go to either Emory or Georgia Tech. Your comments are rooted in some dysfunctional delusions rather than in fact.

Don’t make comments on here that you cannot back up. It just reveals your own ignorance and stupidity.

Dave

December 11th, 2009
8:52 pm

real: Again, do your research. Yes, Emory, UF, Vandy and GT rank above UGA. But UGA ranks above Auburn, LSU, both Miss schools, USC, UA, Clemson, etc. And if you want to talk about party schools, look no further than UF and LSU and their drinking issues. And while Ga St is a solid overall institution, it is nowhere near any of the schools mentioned above. Great, you can post links, too bad you do not actually read the data. Yes, sports studies is a major, but a majority of the grads from UGA are in the sciences, business, education, etc. I have no problem with an opinion, but please do not act like you are giving facts when you are not.

How does it feel to be smarter than everyone else?

December 11th, 2009
9:32 pm

Mishap: How was college in China? Did you go to an oriental university? How smart were you in the 3rd grade? Of course, I’m sure you were smarter, better mannered, good at chess, and gosh, probably well behaved. Why would your parents move here? Were they just lucky that they were accepted to UGA?

Tired of being laughed at and beat up just because you are the smartest guy at Target?

P.S. When you get older you may learn that not everyone cares how smart you think they are, although how well you use youre intelligence might garner some attention.

tired of AA

December 11th, 2009
10:21 pm

Let’s face it! Black male or female applicants and any white female applicants have tremendous advantages over any white male applicant, period. The white male must have considerably higher GPA, SAT/ACT scores and tougher academic courses than the minority student in order to be accepted. We are moving to a state that honors all its population- I’m sick of the UGA crap

Maureen Downey

December 12th, 2009
8:28 am

tired of AA, Actually, in college admissions today, white females are the marjority of applicants and hold no edge. In fact, they pay a price by getting turned out more often now because there are so many qualified female applicants.
There have been several pieces in the CHronicle of Higher Education about less qualified males getting in over females because colleges need gender balance. For example, most private colleges – includuing Emory and Vanderbilt – are about 55 female and 45 male. I believe UGA is about 60 female and 40 male.
The problem is that when gender balance gets skenwed, neither girls nor boys want to go. There are some historically black colleges where the ratio is way off; 80 female to 20 male.
I have written about this and will post a link to some articles when I get on my work computer.
Maureen

Not so carzy college professor

December 12th, 2009
8:39 am

tired,

Make your argument based on logic and data, not on your emotion and imagination (which may be borderline hallucination)…

Lee

December 12th, 2009
10:35 am

“But Georgia’s a far better academic school than Georgia Southern, Georgia State, Mercer, Berry, Georgia College, Shorter, Armstrong, Columbus College, Valdosta State, etc. In fact, it’s a far better academic school than any other SEC school except for Vanderbilt and Florida. It far outclasses Auburn and Alabama…”

Wow heeldawg, did you believe EVERYTHING they told you at orientation?

Bottom line, once you enter the workforce, WHERE you went to school becomes less and less important – and it wasn’t THAT important to start with.

tired of AA

December 12th, 2009
10:50 am

No so- Why don’t you learn to spell “crazy” not carzy- You are part of the problem as well. You and many of your colleagues, look down on white male applicants and have preconceived notions that they will now be the minority in your institutions. Many of you believe that their “daddies” have made a few calls and pulled a few strings to get them into college, so your underlying mission is to deny them any consideration on equal footing! I assure you- I am not hallucinating but passionate and unafraid to uncover the “hidden truth” . I have seen black female applicants with inferior course work and SAT/ ACT scores be admitted every time over a white male with higher GPAs, course work, and test scores. Furthermore, many of the majority black public high schools in Georgia, have inferior course work yet touted as rigorous- It’s true and everybody knows it. This reverse discrimination at UGA is tolerated and the peons can’t do anything about it.

FultonTeacher

December 12th, 2009
11:04 am

“Furthermore, many of the majority black public high schools in Georgia, have inferior course work yet touted as rigorous- It’s true and everybody knows it.” Please provide the data to back up that statement. Not general statements, but specific data regarding all predominantly black schools within the state of Georgia. I’d love to share it with my colleagues.

real

December 12th, 2009
11:22 am

Georgia’s brightest kids pick school based on alot of factors and here are a few quotes from Jonathan Dwyer RB Ga Tech, Coach Paul Johnson Ga tech and Morgan Burnett of Ga Tech, who has a brother Cap Burnett, who was a starting safety for UGA in the 90′. The key thing that all these young men said was education was the major factor in deciding to go to Ga Tech over UGA.

These are the words from Georgia Tech running back Jon Dwyer, “I came to Tech, to be part of a family atmosphere,” he said. “Academics was a big part, too.”

“I think there are a lot of other factors involved,” Johnson said. “Do [recruits] want to see the programs comparable? Sure. But there are a lot of contrasts between Georgia and Georgia Tech, far more than who wins the game. The location, majors that are offered, prestige of certain programs, there’s a lot of factors that go into it.”

“Tech has the best to offer in the form of athletics, academics, coaching staff and academic support. I like the fact that they help you and guide you but treat you like a man and let you make decisions on your own as well. The facilities are top notch and combine that with the coaches and academics, it wasn’t a hard decision for me.” (Ga Tech Safety Morgan Burnett)

“He was in the cradle of a family that stressed education. It was why he chose Georgia Tech instead of the University of Georgia, where he surely would have played with a better quarterback who could have helped boost his statistics.” (Former Tech WR Calvin Johnson)

R-E-A-L

December 12th, 2009
11:26 am

Georgia’s brightest kids pick school based on alot of factors and here are a few quotes from Jonathan Dwyer RB Ga Tech, Coach Paul Johnson Ga tech and Morgan Burnett of Ga Tech, who has a brother Cap Burnett, who was a starting safety for UGA in the 90′. The key thing that all these young men said was education was the major factor in deciding to go to Ga Tech over UGA.

These are the words from Georgia Tech running back Jon Dwyer, “I came to Tech, to be part of a family atmosphere,” he said. “Academics was a big part, too.”

“I think there are a lot of other factors involved,” Johnson said. “Do [recruits] want to see the programs comparable? Sure. But there are a lot of contrasts between Georgia and Georgia Tech, far more than who wins the game. The location, majors that are offered, prestige of certain programs, there’s a lot of factors that go into it.”

R-E-A-L

December 12th, 2009
11:27 am

“Tech has the best to offer in the form of athletics, academics, coaching staff and academic support. I like the fact that they help you and guide you but treat you like a man and let you make decisions on your own as well. The facilities are top notch and combine that with the coaches and academics, it wasn’t a hard decision for me.” (Ga Tech Safety Morgan Burnett)

“He was in the cradle of a family that stressed education. It was why he chose Georgia Tech instead of the University of Georgia, where he surely would have played with a better quarterback who could have helped boost his statistics.” (Former Tech WR Calvin Johnson)

R-E-A-L

December 12th, 2009
11:29 am

Alot of people wanted to see some statistics about the universities in the state of Georgia well here it is and its based on Economic value of a University system of Georgia degree.

http://advancement.spsu.edu/news/index.html

i agree

December 12th, 2009
11:30 am

to Fulton teacher- No data is provided as you are well aware, because that study would be highly offensive and deemed prejudiced. This debate has been going on for a while, many middle class white males ARE now the minority or the plan is underway to make ensure they will be the minority. I have seen right here on this blog the questions raised and debated about inferior academic programs at various public and private schools across the state. As a teacher (you) already know that data could never be collected much less publicized! No one would touch that- get your head out of the sand! Better yet, keep padding the gradebook- and keep Hope Alive!

R-E-A-L

December 12th, 2009
11:51 am

http://www.spsu.edu/ecet/whodges/News_f03.pdf

Economic Value of University of System Education

insider information

December 12th, 2009
1:27 pm

tired of AA,

Sounds like you have a tons of inside information that most of us usually don’t. How did you get that information legally?

Tell us what you mean by “equal footing”?

I don’t know if you are a boy or a girl, but you sure sounds like an angry spoiled brat throwing a tantrum — everything is unfair when you don’t get what you want…

Ole Guy

December 12th, 2009
1:35 pm

Real, once again, I’m not too sure just where your reasoning is coming from. Just exactly how does a comparison of under-age drinking arrests, from one college town to another, relate to the initial arguement, which was…(drum roll!) college party towns. If you are suggesting that the greater the number of arrests somehow uquates to the level of partying, you could possibly be on to something. However, I would view the numbers of those arrested as representative of kids who didn’t pay attention in their E&E training (escape and evade). Any dumbell can drink till he falls down (been there done that!)…it don’t take no “colij edicashun” to know when it’s time to “split the scene”.

As for a comparison of graduation rates…I still don’t folley your reasoning. If you are suggesting that kids go to UGA in order to party hardy, once again, you COULD be onto something. However, I would suspect that goal dominates the agendas of a great percentage of college joes, and jills, across the American collegiate landscape.

Are you suggesting that sports studies is a syllabus of so-called “crip courses”, that is, topics which require a minimum amount of time engaged in the humdrum endeavours of study, thus allowing more time for the activities for which college life was intended? ONCE AGAIN, you could be onto something! In my earlier years, the dorm halls, where we football guys sometimes hibernated, was littered with chicken bones, empty chilie cans, and empty beer bottles. We all “majored” in sports studies, during which we would run pass patterns, and review tapes from last week’s game. Some of us, upon failure to maintain the minimum GPA, were greeted by Uncle Sam…and that, my friend, was no party!

Have a good day, Real.

tired of AA

December 12th, 2009
1:59 pm

yeah I am angry and go ahead and make any judgment you want. Tantrum…. hardly! I work in a public school system and see the grade padding for some, hear the racial comments of some teachers, and witnessed special treatment towards the so called “disadvantaged” .So, I am mad and powerless. I see the local boys, do everything right, yet it’s never good enough. At one of the HS in our area, the minority females get EVERYTHING! As you know, equity has never been a UGA policy and now the “slant” is to give more advantages to the minority and HS are complicit in helping them out. For some of the female students I know, accepted to UGA, (I personally have seen their scores/grades and compared them to other white males with slightly higher grades/scores) and the female white and minority students were accepted and the white males denied! It is an outrage and a travesty. And to “I agree”- grade inflation is alive and well in Georgia public schools as the stakes are high, for HOPE and funding. Yeah I know I sound bitter, but watching some of the brightest and best get shut out, it creates this anger. I guess we are still paying for the sins of our fathers and it seems like we will continue to do so.

real

December 12th, 2009
3:03 pm

heeldawg, you are someone who obvioudly dont know what your talking bout. True UGA have high admissions standards and its the biggest school in the state for humanities programs they offers a great selection of programs but like alot of people have already said on this board top students not football players in the state dont go to UGA. More than 30% of UGA student population at UGA are transfers from junior colelges get your facts right before you spout of incorrect information to the masses

Secondly, you claim that UGA outclasses Auburn University and The University of Alabama in what way?? in the number of students who have mullets including you. UGA is not superior in academics to Georgia Southern, Georgia State, Mercer, Berry, Georgia College, Shorter, Armstrong, Columbus College, Valdosta State. If you look at my link in the previous post UGA is not ranked in the top [4] in graduate earning power in its own state and that figure does not include Emory or any of the the private schools so what value are you talking about????? Sorry to break this news to you but Auburn and The University of Alabama are ranked in the top 4 in earning power in their state and there are more top ranked schools in Forbes Magazine. The schools they go up against include Troy University, University of Alabama-Huntsville, UAB and University of South Alabama which has top notch medical school on campus. Get over yourself UGA is good school that the AJC is making it seem like its Harvard or Duke when in reality it is not but its still just UGA.

Dave

December 13th, 2009
3:44 pm

Real: You seem to want to blame UGA for the fact that the AJC ran this story. As well, you selectively look at rankings, but ignore facts. For instance, you tell us to take a look at Forbes, but do you menting that in the top 25 public univ., UGA was ranked 19 (surprise!). You seem to have anger issues against UGA, but throw random statements out, such as why the GA Tech running back selected his college, which is based upon his perception, but early bash UGA for it’s athletics. No one is stating that UGA is perfect, or the best college out there, but you have to understand that when a majority of the publications rank it so high, maybe your perception is wrong.

As for tired of AA, get real as well. For most colleges, they would love to see more males in their classrooms, but the number of males applying to colleges is well below females. Colleges where the female population are at 60% (like UGA!) would love to see more males, but only if they both apply and do well in the classroom. You are off-base if you think that UGA or other colleges are slanting things to drive out males.

High School Student

December 13th, 2009
3:51 pm

Hey real- I go to high school and guess what? All the kids who have straight C’s and 1500 SAT scores will be attending Bama because it is the only place that would accept them. I have a 98.9 GPA with all gifted and Advanced Placement courses and a 2200 SAT score. Guess where I am going- UGA. Oh yeah, and my intended major is sports studies.

what about it

December 15th, 2009
12:08 pm

all that is being dashed are the hope’s of young white males who want to go to UGA. My son had a higher GPA and SAT score that many of his minority and female friends plus he took honors and AP classes, but when it came time to be accepted his white tail was left at home while his friends were accepted.

Dave

December 17th, 2009
9:19 am

What about it: First, UGA is under a court order to not use race or gender as a factor in admissions. Second, these two fields are optional on any college application, and as such would not have the impact you state. Third (as I said above), most colleges (except a few technically focused ones) wish they had more males (UGA included), so the idea that males are being discriminated against in college admissions is absurd. Most likely there were other reasons for his lack of admission, but don’t go making up reasons for this! Call the college and find out the reason, but don’t spew out erroneous facts just because he was not admitted.