Uniform uprising lands 1,500 Clayton teens in hot water

This is why I don’t like uniforms, especially for high school students.

Uniforms are more trouble than they’re worth in light of the research showing no impact on academic performance. It seems to me that uniforms create a policing nightmare for schools with little to no payoff.

As the AJC reported Tuesday:

Tired of school uniforms, more than 1,500 Clayton County high school students came to school on Friday in what school officials called “non-appropriate dress.”

Now the students are facing suspensions, detentions and other punishments.

After questions from the AJC, school officials confirmed on Tuesday that the district was the “target” of an organized protest.

“Based on an incomplete survey of schools, the district has determined that more than 1,500 students arrived at school on Friday in non-appropriate dress,” district spokesman Charles White said in a statement.

White declined to say how many students were suspended, but said they were all disciplined. White said that discipline varied from school to school. He said he could not comment on specifics because schools are closed all week for Thanksgiving

“In several cases, this was in direct defiance of school-level administrative instructions to students advising them to be in uniform dress or face consequence for their actions,” he said in a statement.

The students at the county’s nine high schools organized online by sending messages urging their friends to “buck the system,” White said.

The uniform boycott, called “Protest As One,” was also discussed among 782 members of a public Facebook group called “Clayton County high school students against required uniforms.”

One student organizer wrote, “they can’t suspend you all and you will be making a stand for yourself.”

But the students learned otherwise.

“Students who participated in this deliberate attempt to interrupt the school routine made a bad choice on Friday and need to be held responsible for that decision,” Superintendent Edmond Heatley said in a statement. “It should be noted that disciplinary actions were based on students’ failure to follow instructions and disrupting the school and not on being out of uniform dress.”

Most school districts that institute uniforms exempt high schools as it’s very hard to tell 18-year-olds how to dress.

Clayton ordered all elementary and middle school students last year to wear uniform dress, including khaki pants, skirts, polo shirts and sweaters of the same color. This year, the policy was expanded to high schools.

I think it was a mistake and creates needless controversy and ill will among both parents and students.

Anyone disagree?

96 comments Add your comment

catlady

November 25th, 2009
6:11 am

I am not a big fan of uniforms, but I think Clayton Co needs a visible symbol that someone is “doing something” about the schools’ reputations. They can’t/won’t make them do homework or come to school prepared or study, but they can make them wear clothes that are uniformly (haha) decent.

As to the parent who says he cannot afford it: get two uniforms for each child, and a pair or two of jeans for off days. Uniforms are cheaper than most jeans that teens will consent to wear.

We have a dress code that is never enforced. What kind of message does that send?

drew (former teacher)

November 25th, 2009
6:27 am

I really have no strong feelings either way regarding dress code at schools, but I’m glad to see that the students bucking the system are being disciplined. Yes, the dress code creates a “policing nightmare”, like many other rules and policies…I guess we could just dump all the rules and policies that are tough to enforce, and allow students to do as they please, eh?

And you have to take into account that this is Clayton County. A few years ago, as a teacher in Clayton County, I was expected to enforce the dress code, which simply called for students to have their shirts tucked in, and their pants above their butts. I wish I had a dollar for everytime I asked a student to tuck their shirt in, or pull up their pants. This was a policing nightmare too, made worse by the fact that my administrators were unwilling to discipline students who openly and defiantly ignored both the policy and my requests to comply (this was during the Barbara Pullen era, when “improving” discipline consisted basically of ignoring misbehavior). In other words, the dress code was there, but rarely enforced, which presented students with EXACTLY the wrong message: these are the rules, but don’t worry, we’re not going to actually enforce them. And the students learned. They learned they could violate the dress code without fear of being disciplined. And many went on to learn that other rules could also be ignored without consequence. Ahhh…the joy of watching students learn!

You state that a dress code has no impact on academic performance. Are you referring to high schools only? I’m not saying it does or doesn’t, but do you have any studies to back that up?

If students/parents have a problem with “their” school systems dress policy, they need to take it to the school board that created the policy. This isn’t the 60’s…this isn’t a civil rights issue…and mass defiance should not be tolerated. The only thing worse than a school dress code, is a school dress code that’s not enforced. And if ever there was a school system in need of more discipline and order, it’s Clayton County.

Ernest

November 25th, 2009
6:31 am

Uniforms by themselves is not the solution to the discipline challenges many schools face. They send a psychological message to the students that a ‘business like’ environment exists for the purpose of education. For them to work, it will take most of the ’silent majority’ of parents to support this policy and not allow the voices of dissenters (usually a vocal minority) to undermine the intent. If enforcement of the policy falls solely on the school administration and there is defiance to the policy, it will fail.

benman

November 25th, 2009
7:52 am

Most schools that have a “dress” issue have other problems to go along with it. Uniforms are the beginning of a school administration taking back their school. Most schools that institute a uniform policy have gang problems, thuggish behavior, etc. in the school. People who yell against uniforms need to realize you have to start somewhere.

Maureen Downey

November 25th, 2009
7:57 am

Drew, I don’t have access to all my archives on uniforms from this home computer, but here is one well respected study on school uniforms: Maureen

In one of the largest studies on the effects of school uniforms, sociologists David Brunsma and Kerry Rockquemore concluded that uniforms have no direct effect on substance use, behavioral problems or attendance and may actually hurt academic achievement.

In effect, the study found, uniforms are akin to throwing a new coat of paint on a crumbling building. The building may well look better, but it’s still falling apart.

[...] here to see the original:  Uniform uprising lands 1500 Clayton teens in hot water | Get Schooled By admin | category: school uniform | tags: are-more, research, the-research | The Sad [...]

Amanda

November 25th, 2009
8:40 am

Wearing uniforms is a step in the right direction. There seems to be a problem with us as adults enforcing rules upon our children. In the real world which these high schoolers will soon be a part of there are rules and regulations and just because you are “18″ it does not exclude you from following the law of the land. Instead of focusing on why they should not be forced to wear uniforms lets focus on what we can do to stop the children from having sex in school!!!!. Parents need to see what children wear to school, its deplorable. I have 5 children in Clayton County Schools and with some of the clothes that the young ladies wear I don’t see how my sons or teachers can focus on the essentials of the day.

Lets Focus On The Real Problems With Our Children…. and uniforms are not it.

Reality Mom

November 25th, 2009
8:57 am

Uniforms let you know who belongs on campus, take away the “keeping up with the Jones’s and make it MUCH easier to get out the door in the morning. It can also instill a feeling of pride in where you go to school and who you are. All places of employment has a dress code and some even make you WEAR A UNIFORM!

Amanda, maybe if there was a uniform requirement, teenage boobies would stay in and boys minds would stay on the school work.

Edugator

November 25th, 2009
9:02 am

DeKalb County’s foray into mandatory uniforms started former Superintendent Johnny Brown on his journey to unemployment. Schools need a reasonable dress code, but uniforms for all goes against our cranky,independent nature as Americans. As noted earlier, uniforms are no more than a coat of paint covering up other problems.

A few magnet schools that mandate uniforms satisfy that need for parents who want it, but mandating it for all is wrong. Good luck with the protest movement. Its a great lesson in civics.

Maureen Downey

November 25th, 2009
9:08 am

Reality Mom, I can agree with you that uniforms counter the revealing clothing problem but disagree on the “keeping up with the Joneses.” Having gone to 12 years of school in a uniform, there were still many ways for affluence to surface, from shoes, to belts, to jewelry, to purses, to coats. We did not call it “bling,” but we were certainly aware of and impressed by the accessories that classmates wore and the vacations they took. Uniforms may make kids look more alike, but I think they are still able to tell who has stuff and who doesn’t.
Maureen

Philosopher

November 25th, 2009
9:23 am

I am very proud of the students who had the guts to protest this stupidity! It took exactly this kind of action for girls to get the freedom to wear something besides dresses to school! Uniforms are a bandaid over a very big booboo, they are one more step towards making little non-thinking robots out of children…hundreds of little followers. They are one more control-freak, feel-good measure on the part of adults that states loud and clear “we don’t want you to be individuals, think for yourselves or be different in any way…we want you docile and unthinking… just like cattle. Uniforms do not hide social status…kids always know who’s poor and who’s not…and kids need to learn to accept and deal with that. Uniforms do not prevent gangs…gangs have no trouble letting kids know who they are and who they are affiliated with. This is NOT a military society and we are a people who have the right to be individuals. And if you don’t let kids show their individuality in their dress, they’ll find it in some MUCH less acceptable way. Hell, folks why are you so willing to make little clones out of children? Remember when you first started letting your toddler pick out his own clothes…they didn’t match, and plaid and polkadots looked beautiful to them…but over time, they learned what was acceptable and what you would let them out the door wearing. Well, here we go again…kids need to learn wear acceptable clothes, within your budget…and for that matter, how to care for them, too. Uniforms are a lazy, irresponsible way for adults to avoid dealing with life’s important issues…just another abdication of parental obligation to their kids.
And last, all you right wingers that had your protest tea parties…did you get punished for that? Weren’t you proud of that? Well, if you squelch your kids now, they’ll never have the guts to stand up and protest injustice when it’s real and it matters. Hitler succeeded with his diabolical death machine because the people were FOLLOWERS!

dbow

November 25th, 2009
9:34 am

As a former admin myself, I can state without a doubt, uniforms are a waste of time and effort. I wasted so much of my own time and the time of the teachers with this nonsense that it boggles the mind. All it takes is one teacher to not enforce the rules and the whole school is thrown into an uproar. And that’s exactly what happened. Teachers get mad at us because they think we’re not enforcing the dress code when in fact we are, but when it’s the same student time and again, it’s not us it’s the parents that refuse to comply. As much as I would love to suspend the parents, that’s a little beyond my authority.

Philosopher

November 25th, 2009
9:39 am

Reality Mom: if you think ANYTHING is going to keep teenage boys’ minds off teenage girls’ “boobies”, you must not have a teenage boy!

free market educator

November 25th, 2009
9:40 am

Clayco kids, just solve the problem like one Berkeley student did in the seventies; go to school naked. Yep, the school could find no constitutional reason to make him wear clothes.

dbow

November 25th, 2009
9:44 am

This is a off the topic, but I haven’t seen this issue addressed anywhere. In my district it is unofficial “official” policy to allow multiple retakes on summative assignments until the students have passed. This also applies to missed homeworks and other formative work as well. Now we have no zero policy being thrust down our throats. Of course there’s no study’s to show that any of this benefits the student, but the district is pushing it anyway. I did a little unscientific survey of the parents of my students to get their thoughts. I couldn’t find one parent that thought it was right. So what does anyone else think?

live.love.eat.

November 25th, 2009
9:51 am

I have always figured uniforms were to keep the student population “uniform.” I thought it was an attempt to deter students from thinking they were superior to others because of the way they dressed (however it isnt working that well students still manage to differentiate themselves). If you are arguing about individuality one word: personality.

Philosopher

November 25th, 2009
10:06 am

live.love.eat.-Yes personality- it takes a healthy personality to stand up for what is right and against what is wrong. Squelching”personality” over and over again with messages like don’t question, don’t think, don’t protest, you must dress like and act like everyone else, diminishes that healthy personality. Because, eventually, most of them “get” that message. The “don’t think for yourself “message becomes ingrained ( it is, after all, a much easier path) and when the important crossroads comes and they have to make a decision…they follow the crowd, right or wrong!

zoe

November 25th, 2009
10:09 am

For the record, it was not until your article surfaced that teachers were even aware of the “protest.” If a protest goes unheard until someone creates a story about it by friending a kid on facebook to find out about a wall post almost a month old, is it still a protest? The kids that came to school out of uniform were the exact same ones that did it daily. The uniform policy came about because there was no enforcement of the previous dress code. I’m of the mind, let them wear what they want. The only problem is that many of our girl students would come to school looking like they are auditioning to work at the Pink Pony Southside and the boys would walk around with their pants down to their knees showing off drawers. I looked up the facebook group you quoted, many were names of kids that do not even go to school in Clayton County or have graduated. Even with you publicizing the group in the article, I still don’t see many new converts.

Philosopher

November 25th, 2009
10:15 am

A very sincere query. Why, if a child comes to school “dressed like a Pink Pony Southside employee, or a boy wears his pants with the crotch down to his knees, are they not removed from the classroom, the parents called and the child not allowed back into the classroom until minimum dresscode requirements are met?

high school teacher

November 25th, 2009
11:21 am

Philosopher, chances are that there are bigger fish to fry.Clothing takes a back seat to fighting, stealing, etc. Obviously, however, given time, those small fish grow bigger.

In the ideal school that exists in my head, uniforms are a great idea – right up there with optional public school after the age of 14.

Philosopher

November 25th, 2009
11:53 am

As I see it from 22 years of dealing with public schools, you’re not the only one who would be happy with it…It seems many teachers would be happy if we dressed the kids in uniforms with velcro closures, put them in straight jackets, duct taped their mouths shut, restrained them in wheelchairs and rolled them in at 8 and out at 3. The issue isn’t about clothing… it’s about the propensity to control instead of to teach…and the very serious consequences as a result.

high school teacher

November 25th, 2009
11:57 am

Please understand that I am not a part of your aforementioned category. For me it’s not necessarily about control but about eliminating distractions, which is why I favor a non-compulsory educational system.

Elsie

November 25th, 2009
12:00 pm

I have only anecdotal “evidence”, but here’s my two cents’ worth. I work on a K-12 campus with required uniforms. Several times each year, we have “dress down” days for various reasons. Behavior takes a nosedive on those days! I would support our uniform policy for no more reason than this. As for expressing individuality, our students have a limited choice in their uniforms, and they are allowed to accessorize within certain guidelines. And the “policing nightmare”? Policing uniforms is no more difficult than policing any other dress code.

Surely we are not suggesting that we abandon any rules that the students “just don’t like” or that are inconvenient for the adults. What sort of modeling is that?

Philosopher

November 25th, 2009
12:23 pm

high school teacher: Sorry- I really didn’t get that…my mistake, entirely.
And, of course, there have been many,great (real) teachers…but sadly, the domineering, controlling, “don’t question me”, “outlaw it rather than make it a teaching opportunity” types leave so much damage in their wakes.

just browsing

November 25th, 2009
12:30 pm

Philosopher you are so right. What is often not embraced in the expensive curricula used in by so many districts, are opportunities that would enable students to think critically and perhaps make better decisions- even those related to dress code. So much emphasis in Georgia schools is on PR and making classrooms appear to be healthy learning environments, as opposed to developing in students the ability to challenge and again- develop the intellect to think critically and consequently make better decisions which could yield numerous future benefits. Georgia does not want that for its students, nor its teachers.

just browsing

November 25th, 2009
12:33 pm

Philosopher- you can thank high stakes testing for all of that. If we developed critical thinking- real critical thinking- tests would take care of themselves. There is a lot to be gained for learning from diverse perspectives and opinions- little creativity garnered from group think.

just browsing

November 25th, 2009
12:34 pm

Philosopher you are so right. What is often not ingrained in he expensive curricula used in so many districts, are opportunities that would enlighten students with the ability to think critically and perhaps make better decisions- even those related to dress code. So much emphasis in Georgia schools is on PR and making classrooms appear to be healthy learning environments, as opposed to developing in students the ability to challenge and again- think critically. Georgia does not want that for its students, nor its teachers.

WTH?

November 25th, 2009
12:35 pm

Glad to see Clayton county is yet again setting a great example for the rest of the state…What better way to keep the kids excited about coming to school. Making them stay home (suspension) because they aren’t wearing the right the clothes? And the purpose of uniforms is so that learning is distracted by what kids are wearing….I’m sure they’ll learn a lot more staying at home than they would learn in school in street clothes.

By the way, has crime, disciplinary actions, or absenteeism decreased since uniforms were mandatory?

lets call a spade a spade

November 25th, 2009
12:39 pm

Don’t worry, I’m sure the boys will be wearing a “uniform” in a couple of years anyway. Btw what are the demographics of Clayton County schools?

Just a Thought

November 25th, 2009
1:08 pm

Maureen, I am all for research. However, I work in a Clayton County high school and experience has proven that uniform dress (which is very different from uniforms) makes a HUGE difference. I have been in Clayton several years (6 superintendents ago) and the previous dress code policy was a disaster. Part of that instability had to do with factors beyond our control as we went through one administration after another. It is hard to establish any kind of culture for discipline or learning when the top boss changes every year. Uniform dress is what we needed to help get a grip on some of the dress code chaos. Trust me, it was just as much of a “policing” problem as you might think uniform dress is now, if not more. That policy had no teeth and was much more frustrating to deal with as a teacher than the one we have now. This one is worth the hassle. In addition, nearly every elite private school in the Metro area requires uniforms. It has to have some bearing on creating an environment conducive with learning.

The students are starting to see the difference too. Self-presentation is important. Our kids were losing sight of that and uniform dress has helped to restore a sense of self-respect and care in one’s appearance. Some may say this is not the school’s responsibility but we can’t have it both ways. Either we deal with these gaps in their development as best we can or we let them continue to think it’s okay to come to school looking like wanna be rap stars and video queens. Not every kid dressed this way but the ones who did WERE a distraction. This year alone I’ve seen the same “thug” young men from last year come to school dressed in button down collared shirts, vests, and khakis. That is by choice as “dressing up” is not required but they CHOOSE to. How can this be a bad thing?

We recently visited another metro Atlanta high school for a game. It was a school day and our kids were quick to comment on how unkempt the students looked. Even though they don’t like uniform dress, they saw what a difference it made. This is a step in the right direction. It helps our kids see that we take learning seriously and that there are STANDARDS when you come to school. Don’t begrudge us that.

Maureen Downey

November 25th, 2009
1:17 pm

Just a thought, I think you make great points and I, too, have noticed that kids in uniforms present a crisper image and certainly suggest greater professionalism. However, if all that is changing with uniforms is appearance and not achievement and, if students are resistant, as some apparently are, I think we have to ask, “Is this worth it?”
From the comments here, there is no consensus on whether uniforms improve a school. However, you make a great case that uniforms have helped your school and have been well received by students for the most part. I think your school ought to stay with them.
Maureen

Philosopher

November 25th, 2009
1:45 pm

Just a Thought; See how well children can conform? I find that scary, myself.
There should always be a middle ground, known as compromise, that lets a kid figure out what is acceptable and what isn’t, and consequences for the unacceptable. That way, when they become adults, they don’t always have to wait for someone to tell them the next step.
I get really scared when people are so quickly ready to give up simple basic rights in order to maintain an image. Whose image? A school full of children all dressed up in uniforms conjures up an image of the schools in Nazi Germany to me, So who decides which image is best? And speaking of images…a dirty, wrinkled uniform that’s too big or too small, isn’t a very pretty image…do you have rules on that, too?

Just a Thought

November 25th, 2009
1:55 pm

You are right Maureen. The opinions on this issue are divided as is the research. Maybe the benefits of uniform dress can’t be tied down to a statistic. Maybe the benefits are much more intangible. In this age of NCLB, the intangible things just don’t seem to matter much. Uniform dress seems to be a step in the right direction to creating a positive culture in Clayton County schools. A baby step…but an important one nonetheless. Have a great day!

Philosopher

November 25th, 2009
2:17 pm

How quickly we give away basic rights for the sake of an image! And whose image, by the way, do we choose? You like the crisp, look-alike image of uniforms. For me, a schoolyard full of kids in uniform conjures up an image of the schools of Nazi Germany. And what about that crisp, clean uniform image…a wrinkled, dirty, too small or too big uniform isn’t a very pretty sight…do you have rules about that, too?
Here’s another teaching opportunity lost to conformity and control. Kids should be given room to make decisions within a clear set of guidelines and held accountable for bad choices. Teach them this as kids and when they are adults, they’ll have the tools necessary to make good choices. Otherwise they just float around waiting for direction…anyway the wind blows.

Alch

November 25th, 2009
2:33 pm

Post of the day…Just a Thought!!! Amen!! I couldn’t have said it better.

Philosopher

November 25th, 2009
3:06 pm

Maureen- the posteater is at it again…

Philosopher

November 25th, 2009
3:53 pm

There have been excellent points made on both sides of this issue today and a wonderful tolerance for opposing positions. It is heartening to see it happen!
And…since I am obviously quite opinionated…here I go again.
My father and grandfathers and uncles fought in World War II and in Korea. All of them impressed on me the importance of questioning ANYTHING, however “crisply” and prettily presented, that took away any basic right. They told me what they saw and about people who were without the rights and freedoms we enjoy and how easy it is to take them for granted and to lose them. They imparted a will and a promise that I stand up for individual freedoms and never blindly accept excuses to take them away…and that I warn my children not to become so complacent as to stop questioning. This is the ONLY way that America will continue to remain FREE and strong. Beware that you do not inadvertently produce an entire generation of crisp, clean little sheep…there’s a lot more to lose here than a pretty image.
In a school assignment, my daughter wrote a letter telling us why she is thankful for us. Like any good parent, it made me tear up. This is every teacher’s dream student, never misbehaves, always gets her work done and makes straight “A”’s…(and yes, it does worry me, but I have 2 others to keep me humble). But the most touching part of the letter was when she thanked us for expressing our opinions, teaching her to express hers, and for teaching her not to be a follower! One of my proudest parent moments!
Happy Thanksgiving, all.

Singing to the Choir

November 25th, 2009
4:24 pm

to dbow, there have been posts on the grading issues you are describing. I wonder if you are in Cobb County. This is the policy that Cobb is now following. It started with the fuzzy math and has spread to other subjects.

I would say the policy works if you could create lesson plans for each child. So child A that has mastered the data moves on, but child B is taught the lesson again until he/she can master the data. We all know that is a dream world unless you homeschool your child.

say what?

November 25th, 2009
6:20 pm

For the students and the parents protesting I find that I live in a county with a bunch of morons. when I moved to Clayton 14 years ago it was better. Now we have people with an online protest about “tyranny and oppression of ADULTS”. Since when are minors under the age 18 considered adults? Did you mean being oppressed by adults. Stay in school and learn something more than the assinine belief that somewhere civil rights are being violated because students cannot choose what to wear. In the real world dress codes are enforced on real jobs, so this is training for the real world. For those who cannot cut it you have a choice of two uniforms if you cannot focus on education- jail uniform or fast food.

I do think that Friday should be a regular dress day, but until the rule/policy is changed, my minor children will be in uniforms. Parents should work to change the policies.

d

November 25th, 2009
6:57 pm

I don’t care if we have a uniform or not, but I think the students need to be dressed for the environment that they are in. My personal opinion is that the purpose of school is to prepare you for the world outside of school. That being said, many companies will allow you to wear appropriately fitting blue jeans to work, so why are jeans usually banned from a uniform school? I think you can get a pair of five-pocket Levis, Wranglers, Lee, whatever that fit properly and have a decent shirt (t-shirt, polo, again whatever) that fits properly and still let these kids be kids while preparing them for the real world. I’ve gotten to the point when I see a boy’s boxers, I say “nice boxers, hide them for me please,” or I will take the high road “Would you mind pulling up your pants, I don’t really want to have to go through the hassle of writing you up to send you to ISS today. Thank you.” Now I will say there was a young lady at my school a couple of weeks ago whose skirt was way too short for the school environment and her grandmother said that she didn’t see a problem with it. There’s the problem. Most of these kids, even if they have jobs, aren’t buying these clothes for the kids. I also am tired of hearing kids with a 32 inch waist say they’re not comfortable wearing pants any smaller than a 38.

On the plus side, since California is a trend-setter, I will note that I was there over the summer for a week and saw exactly two young men sagging their pants, so maybe it’s nearly over.

Ole Guy

November 25th, 2009
8:50 pm

Philo, Erny said it best…”PROFESSIONALISM”…I would think all the other issues discussed are somewhat superflous. Concerns of turning kids into robots, denied the opportunity of self-expression are, with respects to your esteemed standing in the ed elite community, pure nonesense. In fact, when it boils down to the very reason we, property tax payers, send these kids to the world of public academe, skills of self-expression are definetely not what we need. We need generations who both can and will absorb and digest the skills needed to sustain (what once was) global prominence…I can guarantee that self-expression “skills” alone will not achieve this goal. First things first, Philo. Letum wait until their college years to express themselves, unless, of course, they decide to go to one of our military academies which produce, as you would I.D. them, ROBOTS.

Sleep well tonight, Philo…we robots will always be on the line.

Christina

November 25th, 2009
9:20 pm

I would like to say THANK GOD !!!!!!!!!!!!!!. I am a happy parent that uniforms is required for all grades. What make high school any different from elementary or middle school? I dont see a different. The reason some of our kids is so disrespectful is because there own parents is supporting what there kids is doing wrong, I think they should have been discipline for breaking the rules.. Uniforms is the best thing that has happened to clayton county. Its a shame that some of our parents will allow there kids to be so rude and disrepectful. Im sure if the kids disobey the teachers and the school, im sure they disrespect there parents and get away with it. Parents should be tired of seeing there kids with the drop down pants where you see there underwear. I dont want to see it cause its a mess. thats why so many kids are not finishing school because the parents will not make them follow simple rules as wear a uniform. How will they hold a job if you cant follow rules, how will they get a scholarship and go to college, or better yet who will want to deal with someone who cant follow rules. Its funny how we let our kids get away with so much that is wrong, but cant encourage them to do right. In reference to the comment it is hard to make a 18 year old wear uniform, thats insane. Can you all not control your kids or do some rule the household and the parent is the child? 18 dont make you grown last I checked. You cant find a real job ate 18, cant get your own credit without a co-signer and better yet you stiil need your parents information to go to college. So tell me how can you not make your 18 year follow your rules if living in your house. What is this world coming to? Parents we have to step up and help our teachers, schools, principles, superintendent, and kids in order for things to get better. The kids needs to stay in a kids place and respect there superiors. They are not in charge the parents are , so start acting like it. I want my kids to achieve, go to college, be sucessful and not struggle as hard. What about you all? The county is not asking for much except wear uniforms. Why cant we enforce that in our homes? Yet we let our kids wear too tight pants with everything hanging out, dropp down pants, and just everything showing, but they too good to wear school uniforms. SUPPORT THE COUNTY, I DO AND I THINK THEY MADE A EXCELLENT DECISION.

Wounded Warrior

November 25th, 2009
9:57 pm

Uniforms might work in the younger grades, but not for high school. The students have a right to their opinion. Seems like the Board needs to worry about the caliber of teachers they are highing…teachers fighting, teachers putting hits on students, and also letting students alone to have sex? Since when is it ok to have a graduate around minors?

What about the students’ whose parent have lost their job? What is in place for those students? Unless the school uniforms are furnished, then they shouldn’t be enforced. I have recently lost my job and couldn’t go out and buy some specific clothes. I have to shop second hand at this time.

Speaking of Uniforms…the AJC ran an article about the School Board getting a Homeland Security Grant for the bus drivers to have uniforms. Since when was the last time did a bus get hijacked by a terriorist? All or none of the administrators should wear uniforms. Leadership starts at the top, and should lead by example.

Wounded Warrior

November 25th, 2009
9:58 pm

mine got lost.

Wounded Warrior

November 25th, 2009
10:03 pm

Simple…All or non of the administrators should wear the uniforms. Lead by example and should start at the top. High School students should be allowed to wear what they want, considered that they are covered.

The bus drivers’ got a grant from Homeland Security for their uniforms. When was the last time that a terrorist hijacked a bus in Clayton Co.? A little humor…

HR needs to re-evaluate the low caliber teachers they have hired, more than uniforms. The Jerry Springer Show type of women fighting over a man, students left alone to have sex in trailors, and teacher threatening a student to have him killed.

Are there vouchers for students whose parents have lost jobs in this hard economy? What is done for these students?

Wounded Warrior

November 25th, 2009
10:04 pm

Low HR moves regarding the low caliber of teachers needs to be addressed instead of this stupid uniform thing.

Wounded Warrior

November 25th, 2009
10:07 pm

Why isn’t my full opinion posted? I am a graduate of clayton county, back when they were accredited…if we disagree or find some humor in a story the AJC posts, then our opinion doesn’t matter? Clayton county’s troubles can directly go to HR, and affirmative action.

Philosopher

November 25th, 2009
11:38 pm

Christina: Jesus loved the rabble rousers…and He frequently chastised the rule makers. Gotta love Him! I never said a thing about breaking all the rules…don’t put words in my mouth…those are yours and you have every right to produce little yes-people if you like. I said teach them to question within the framework of necessary rules and teach them to think for themselves.
Ole Guy, By the time kids get to college, they are already indoctrinated…too late.

Gary Klahr

November 26th, 2009
12:02 am

I agree with Philosopher. The rest of you DON”T GET IT at all. I am no kid–I am a 67 yr old retired lawyer who served EIGHT YEARS on the Governing Bd of the 2nd largest HS district in the nation (the 25k Phx Union district). We are an inner-city, mostly-minority district, and WE HAD NO PROBLEM ENFORCING A REGULAR DRESS CODE.. You-all are confusing DRESS CODES—which we ALL FAVOR—and uniforms which I will FIGHT TO THE DEATH!!!!. Read Dr. Brunsma’s second book on Uniforms on how Long Beach, Cal HS kids threatened SUICIDE if the the Board made them wear unis. If your Bd wants unis—allow PARENT (not kid) opt-out as in Calif., Wisc. Mass., NYC & Miami, Florida among other “small” places. As noted many foolish parents & kids LIKE unis—fine; wear them—but LEAVE US GOOD KIDS & RESPONSIBLE PARENTS ALONE. If you-all want to see unis—go to CUBA< CHINA or NORTH KOREA. As JFK said (in another context)—"We must make the world safe for diversity." and "Patriotism must be inspired—NOT coerced."

As for TWO of the phony arguments for unis (for ALL the myths, see the PARENTS website—www.aprod.org)–1) NONE of the hundreds of parents I have worked with in THIRTY states have EVER wanted to send their kids in fancy, fashion-show clothes to "one up" other kids. That is ZERO in TEN years of fighting mand unis. I'm sure it DOES happen (rarely)—but MY clients JUST want to send their kids in APPROPRIATE, traditional street clothes worn for 100 years in the South & West especially—-logo & striped tee shirts and WELL-FITTED denim jeans. They will sue, protest and do CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE if forced to wear this preppy uniform of polos & khakis; they are perfectly-appropriate clothes for school —but SO ARE tees & jeans.

2) It is just FALSE that regular dress codes are NOT enforceable. NO SCHOOL SHOULD TOLERATE GIRLS SHOWING CLEAVAGE OR BOYS SHOWING UNDERWEAR from droopy pants. Contra to all the nonsense above, a regular dress code—as Philosopher points out—DOES ALREADY prohibit THAT without uniforms—and experience in Phx and 99 pct of U.S. schools show that such codes ARE enforceable; they do NOT lead to litigation & controversy such as you will get with uniforms. U.S. schools spent $100 million combined 40 years ago to expel straight-A boys with LONG HAIR—do you REALLY want to go through THAT waste of $$ again???????
So in conclusion, I actually AGREE with the pro-uni crowd that many (NOT most) kids dress badly and they need to be severely punished if they continue. BUT uniforms (at least w/o opt-out) GROUP-PUNISH the majority GOOD kids too. THAT IS NOT THE AMERICAN WAY.
  Anyone wanting help to stop fully-mand unis, write me at GaryK57647@aol.com or call (602)-265-3150./s/ GARY PETER KLAHR, J.D., Phoenix.

notaracist

November 26th, 2009
9:44 am

A school is a place for learning, not a fashion show. To the person who says that he/she can not afford a uniform, probably has paid more for jeans and hoodies. Furthermore, a kid can express their individuality, when off campus. Parents please lets get to what is really important, that being educating our children. While I believe that there are somethings we must stand firm against with our kids, School Uniforms are not one or them.