She blew the whistle; Public college blew the response.

When I read a story like this, my faith in college administrators diminishes.

According to the AJC story by Alexis Stevens, Sara Castle was thrown out of nursing school at Appalachian Technical College In Jasper  in August 2007,  just 13 weeks before graduating. Castle alleged that her expulsion came after she reported a slack instructor who was dismissing students from their clinic training early on a regular basis.

Appalachian Technical College fired the instructor, but Castle, 55, says she was then expelled for blowing the whistle.

A jury agreed Thursday and awarded her $450,000 in damages. Castle said she and other students would arrive for clinical training early in the morning. By 8 a.m., the instructor would dismiss students even though 740 hours of hands-on training are required for the degree.

It took the jury less than a hour to find for Castle and against the college. That means Georgia taxpayers are stuck paying the bill. (Even if there is insurance, the costs ultimately falls back on taxpayers.)

The story doesn’t get into whether there will be any repercussions to  Appalachian Tech leadership. In fact, the state is considering an appeal of the decision, according to the story, although the rapid jury verdict indicates that Castle mounted a compelling case.

I called the attorney general’s office Friday as it represented the college in court to ask about its response to Castle’s allegations. In essence, the AG’s office says the trial was supposed to be limited to a due process issue and that’s what it went into court ready to address. “The state is looking at our options for how to proceed on this case because the admissible evidence does not support the jury verdict,” say AG spokesman Russ Willard.

So, why was Castle expelled?  Willard says call the state Technical College System of Georgia to find out that information. I am doing so now and will let you know what folks there have to say about Castle’s expulsion.

(It’s almost 2 p.m. and no call back yet from the Technical College System. Its main PR guy is away, so someone else is supposed to call me back. I am leaving shortly for a family funeral so I may not get information on this until Monday.)

61 comments Add your comment

Tom

August 27th, 2009
8:52 pm

What is worse is that I now understand that the State is considering appealing the verdict! That is throwing good money after bad in what should never have gone to trial in the first place. What kind of message does this send to the citizens, students and employee’s of the State of Georgia? It’s ok to do wrong, but just don’t get caught and don’t tell anyone!

ScienceTeacher671

August 27th, 2009
9:11 pm

“Shouldn’t the state and the technical college chief address why there were no consequences to the Appalachian Tech leadership?”

Yes, they should. Has anyone asked the college chief or the Board of Regents for comments?

Lee

August 27th, 2009
9:15 pm

What’s that old adage, “It’s hazardous to be right when the government is wrong.”

Very apt in this situation.

Reality 2

August 27th, 2009
9:31 pm

Can’t the state say it was the administrators’ decision and they are not responsible for their actions? In other words, let those administrators deal with the financial responsibility?

Shannon, M.Div.

August 27th, 2009
9:49 pm

I read that story and was completely baffled. What’s the college’s side? Surely they knew they couldn’t expel someone for whistleblowing. They had to have at least a cover story. It’s baffling that there weren’t any quotes there offering another side to the story. Even if it’s a baldfaced lie, shouldn’t there be an opposing position? Obviously their lawyers didn’t advise them to settle, so… why not?

Maureen's accountability metric

August 28th, 2009
12:24 am

Why was a post that asked why Maureen is a lion when going after tiny Appalachian Tech, but a lamb when it comes to going after corruption close to home removed?

Maureen never seems to mind holding teachers accountable to the taxpayers who pay their salary; is someone afraid to hold Maureen to that same standard of accountability to the readers who pay her salary?

Maureen's accountability metric

August 28th, 2009
12:29 am

To clarify the question raised in the last post, this wasn’t a post that was “lost” in the blog limbo. This was a post that stayed on the blog for close to an hour.

Seems like the prevailing philosophy here is what’s good for the goose isn’t good at all for the gander, whenever someone asks tough, though perfectly valid and legitimate questions about the gander.

metric

August 28th, 2009
6:17 am

As long as teachers are paid by public money, we need someone like Maureen to keep them accountable. Maureen is an employee of a private business. This blog is just that – a blog. She can write about whatever she wants, just as MAM can repeat her criticism over and over (and over and…. is anyone still paying attention?). She has NO obligation to be accountable to any people who posts his/her/its(???) opinions here.

Dr. John Trotter

August 28th, 2009
8:19 am

Quietly, what happened at this technical college is almost a daily occurence in the public schools of Georgia. If a teacher (no matter how good the teacher is) ruffles the administration’s feathers in any way, the move is made to quietly non-renewed this teacher’s contract. This is why the teachers need protection from administrative bullies.

Any answers

August 28th, 2009
8:52 am

I’m not a Dr. like Trotter, but a Mom who has had two children in Georgia High Schools. One thing that really bothers me is – why are classes and teachers so different. Some teachers teach, while others slack off and this is never stops, year after year. My children would tell me this or that teacher is easy, they just tell stories about different things during class, usually not about the subject matter. My children went to one the the top 5 high schools in Georgia and their were many classes that we had to teach at home. My experience is that whenever you approach a teacher regarding classroom material, they become very defensive and your labeled “one of those parents.”

Mac

August 28th, 2009
8:54 am

Dr. Trotter – happens to the administrators too – all the time

Dr. John Trotter

August 28th, 2009
9:40 am

Mac: I am sure that this is true. In fact, when I seldom do run across a decent public school administrator, I tell my colleagues: ¨He/She won´t last. They really don´t want good administrators. They want weasels whom they can control.¨ This is sad.

jim d

August 28th, 2009
9:50 am

TRUE DAT DOC,

That is why Gwinnett is in the shape they are. I like to call it “Alvins theatre of puppetry” (the show of talking hands)

jim d

August 28th, 2009
9:54 am

Can anyone think of a way we can pin this one on poor PARENTING??

there must be a way

Dad of 2 HS boys

August 28th, 2009
11:22 am

Any answer,

I agree with you. One of my son is taking a personal fitness course – a graduation requirement. The only thing they do in the class is run around the track – for the final “exam,” they have to run 5K in 30 min to get an A. It is taught by a coach, and some days she just let kids goof around in the gym.

What’s the point of the course if that’s all what they do? Why do we need a certified teacher – we can just bring in those guys standing in the corner with the sign, “Will work for food.” Let them “teach,” and invite him to enjoy the cafeteria lunch.

David S

August 28th, 2009
11:43 am

Anyone who believes that the government should operate ANYTHING need only look at this situation to see why NOT. The private sector is forced to take their responsibilities personally – not socialize the costs of their failure (absent any government intervention, bailout, subsidy, etc.). Government has no business educating anyone, not at the college level and certainly not at the elementary and high school level.

Seen it all

August 28th, 2009
12:09 pm

Dr. Trot is all right on this one. These school systems don’t want good administrators. They want dumb, inexperienced sycophantic yes men and women they can control. I used to work in a county where, to this day, they only make these sorts of people principals and assistant principals-

1) People who have only been in education four to five years
2) People who have NEVER taught in the classroom in ANY capacity– only worked as PE teachers, music teachers, art teachers, social workers, counselors, speech pathologists, etc.

Why? Because the school system administration only wants hand picked people (good ole boys and girls) and ignorant sycophants to run the schools in their county. You see, it isn’t about the schools, the community, and the children. It’s about power and control. That’s what it’s always about.

Maureen's accountability metric

August 28th, 2009
1:02 pm

Obviously metric, someone is still paying attention, as they were rattled enough to remove a post that had nothing in the way of profanity or objectionable material, but merely pointed out inconsistencies in the AJC’s coverage.

And while we may need someone to keep teachers accountable, if you don’t have people willing to hold the educational bureaucracy accountable for the teaching conditions that have a direct effect on the teacher’s ability to teach, their cries of accountability for teachers ring hollow.

And speaking of accountability and private business, while Maureen may have no legal obligation, there’s this little concept called the market place, and when private business starts to lose credibility with its customers, the customers vote with their wallets, as I’m sure Maureen and the AJC have become painfully aware.

Sara Lee

August 28th, 2009
1:31 pm

This case has been going on for 2 years . The state fought this case with 5 lawyers against one . They filed tons and tons of paperwork in this case and motion upon motion to dismiss and several qualified immunitys were won . Now I hear they are saying that they could not present the whole case THEY are the ones who filed the motions to limit this case to what was able to be presented. In fact if the whole truth were to be told , many more students could tell about this school and the abuses they suffered as a result . The state are also the ones who limited the case to a failure to give a due process hearing which was proven they did not give due process. The state did not have any evidence and did not even call thier own witness to testify. There was no doubt in the Jurys mind that this was simply an abuse of Power . The school was going thru an accredidation and did not want the teacher who laid out of class and did not care of the students who were to be nurses . They certainly did not want the student who reported this to be available for comment to this accredidation board . I wonder to this day if the accredidation board knows the truth of this case . They simply wanted the whistle blower out of the way and they fired the teacher who was an RN and she also lost her license. This can be verified by the state Nursing board

Sara Lee

August 28th, 2009
1:40 pm

The above statement was my opinion

jim d

August 28th, 2009
1:51 pm

And a fine one it is, Sara

Reality 4

August 28th, 2009
1:58 pm

Seen it all…

I agree that we have plenty of “dumb, inexperienced sycophantic yes men and women” teachers to continue supplying such incompetent administrators. If a district wants to have real leaders in the administrative positions, maybe they should start looking outside of education fields more.

william mcniff

August 28th, 2009
2:06 pm

From what I have read here i too am curious as to why the AG wants to appeal. Accordingly I will add my voice by calling the AG. I also want to know what action was taken by the administration to punish who ever expelled this student.

Maureen's accountability metric

August 28th, 2009
2:31 pm

We blow the whistle in Jasper; we swallow the whistle closer to home?

Could that can be the new AJC marketing slogan?

Seen it all

August 28th, 2009
3:52 pm

Reality 4,

Some districts DON’T want real leaders in administrative positions. They want what they are putting in place now.

Reality 4

August 28th, 2009
4:17 pm

Probably very true, and there seem to be plenty of “qualified” administrators that are coming in to the teaching profession. Actually, the district may be doing a service to children by removing them from classrooms – can’t have enough administrators’ positions to get rid of them all, though.

What's Best for Kids?

August 28th, 2009
8:46 pm

Although MAM does repeat her/himself, I, too, would like to know why the APS story is not being covered more. In a world of testing and accountability, why is this cheating thing not being addressed in a larger manner?

ShooShee

August 28th, 2009
11:05 pm

“Appalachian Technical College” – Isn’t that an oxymoron?

John Connor

August 28th, 2009
11:09 pm

What we are seeing here is the arrogance of the Technical College System of Georgia, the same arrogance that makes them think they along with the Governor can dismantle the state’s two-year colleges (Georgia Highlands in Rome, Georgia Perimeter College in metro-Atlanta, Darton in Albany, etc.) and absorb them into tech schools, Never mind that the two-year colleges serve as access institutions to four-year colleges for over 60,000 of Georgia’s students each year. The two institutions (tech schools and two-year colleges) have different missions and serve a different student body, but that doesn’t matter. The greed and arrogance of the Technical College System of Georgia is driving this, so much so that it doesn’t matter that the state is in a terrible financial crunch: the cost of a merger will be high as is converting the tech schools from quarters to semesters, but apparently to Georgia’s governor and the Technical College System of Georgia, it doesn’t matter.

Catamount Crazy

August 28th, 2009
11:13 pm

APS is in our backyard. App Tech, I presume, is in the mountains. MAM has a goog point.

Reality2

August 29th, 2009
6:54 am

What’s best for the kids – agree We all know (administrators, teachers, students and parents) about the teacher who doesn’t teach. Maybe its time to clean up the schools along with wall street, and health care.

tainted

August 29th, 2009
9:44 am

Incompetent teachers remain in the system and get passed around from school to school until someone (admin) is willing to do what it takes to get rid of them. I’ve also seen exceptional teachers get bullied into taking courses and getting certain certifications only because the admin didn’t trust the other teachers to do the job.

em

August 29th, 2009
11:45 am

You know Maureen, I do not know why this story is so significant. The next story I expect to see on this blog is the Osborne story in Oconee County. Retaliation of this nature has become the norm in public schools. Good principals (which there are few and I include Tony in this category) who do not fall into line with the “program” are pushed out. Good teachers who do not agree with the administration’s agenda find themselves harassed, given biased evaluations, or without a job. Even good students incur the wrath of a teacher who is biased. I attribute some of this small mindedness to what I call the “Diploma Mill-Coach-Schools of Education Low Entrance Requirement” Syndrome or DiMCSELER for short. You see, many administrators (and teachers) get their advanced degrees at some nebulous institution that has found that for a few thousand dollars their students can read articles on the latest and greatest fad in education, do “research “ on the internet, and then meet once a week or month somewhere to discuss these “findings”. Then after about a year of this, poof, these folks have “earned” a degree and they are “armed” with the knowledge or lack thereof that goes with it along with the pay raise. It is very rare to find an administrator who is truly an academic. Many of the administrators who I have encountered are ex-football coaches who have outlived their glory days and could not come up with a bright idea if you rubbed their head on a sidewalk. They run the school and manage personnel as if they were still on the football field. Which finally brings me to my last symptom of this horrible, horrible syndrome and that are the low entrance requirements into schools of education. Maureen, did you know that for an undergraduate to be admitted into a school of education in Georgia, a student does not even have to have a 3.0 GPA? These are the real issues of why education is in the state it is in but DiMCSELER Syndrome persists because too many teachers need their jobs (me included), especially in this economy; therefore, public education will probably will not change anytime soon.

A Concerned Citizen

August 29th, 2009
1:34 pm

“What we are seeing here is the arrogance of the Technical College System of Georgia, the same arrogance that makes them think they along with the Governor can dismantle the state’s two-year colleges (Georgia Highlands in Rome, Georgia Perimeter College in metro-Atlanta, Darton in Albany, etc.) and absorb them into tech schools.”

This attitude exists and persists also in the administration of our two-year and four-year institutions, which have become mostly instruments of corporate welfare, putting more and more monies into real-estate acquisitions and construction and less into full-time, tenure-track teaching positions. I feel that this trend will persist for a generation (or two!) until the brain-drain from teaching and subsequent student under-performance will put us further behind the educational performance of other industrialized nations. Yet since the elites will preserve their advantages here, the government probably will still not intervene. May if government funding were determined by some realistic assessment (both quantitative and qualitative) of student performance instead of a head-count, then educational administrations would become more responsible to serving the needs of the public.

catlady

August 29th, 2009
3:02 pm

em, I LOL when I read your piece. How true, how true. We have teachers at my school getting “6th year degrees” whose work consists of just exactly what you describe–work you would expect of a junior in an undemanding college. But our administrators have those degrees, too. Pay your money, get your piece of paper, and your raise. Our county has for years had one of the highest levels of post-bacc degrees for teachers, and all in an extremely rural county!

On the technical schools: they (postsecondary ed in Georgia) all need to be brought under one umbrella, rather than 2 separate ones! Too much duplication and waste! But the DTAE will KILL before that happens!

On administrators: I know there are some good ones. Ours is not. Our whole staff wants to transfer out! It might help if WE could evaluate HER. Administrators should have many years of extremely successful REGULAR classroom teaching experience!

On whistleblowing: the PSC does not have any special protections available for teachers who report possible breaches in ethics. Not surprisingly, there are VERY few ethical violations reported! So everything must be hunky-dorry in K-12 education, right? Kind of like back in the 60s when Alabama had a law that sex offenders had to (voluntarily) register in Montgomery, and no one did, and they concluded that there were no sex offenders in Alabama! Praise God!

Juror

August 29th, 2009
3:47 pm

I was on the jury and from what we heard in court all of the administrators involved are still employed and I believe 2 have been promoted since. The defendants were not convincing at all and in my opinion at least one of them lied on the stand.

Mel

August 29th, 2009
4:51 pm

I find this story simply incredible. It is simply incredible.

Sara Castle saw that her fellow nursing students were not getting adequate training. The instructor repeatedly dismissed the students early from their clinical training. Sara, seeing that she and her fellow nursing students were not getting the proper training, reported the instructor’s actions to the school’s administration.

That was in incredible brave and selfless act. She knew she would risk the wrath of the instructor’s friends and fellow instructors. She also risked the hostility of her fellow classmates as they would now have to make up all the missing clinical hours. She went to the school authorities while her classmates were seemingly content to have shortened classes but take credit for a full day..

Sara had nothing, absolutely nothing, to gain by going to the school authorities and a lot to lose. She went anyway because she was concerned that untrained and unprepared nurses would be a hazard to the public. She was expelled within days after going to the school authorities.

Sara never did get her nursing license. Her classmates, who chose to remain silent, are likely working as nurses. She has suffered horribly for doing that right thing. The article quotes her attorney as saying, ‘She has cried every time I’ve ever met her about this.’

I think the State of Georgia got off easy when she was awarded $450,000. I would have voted to give her a lot more. I think the fact that the case was decided by the jury in less than an hour speaks volumes about the strength of her case and the weakness of the state’s.

The woman should be left in peace. The state should pay her the judgment and let her get on with her life. I find it hard to believe that the state would seriously consider appealing the case. Have they no compassion for this woman?

Reality 4

August 29th, 2009
5:44 pm

Concerned,

Full-time tenure track faculty is expensive and they don’t guarantee good teaching, either. Part-time instructors can be cheap and it is very easy to abuse them by giving them horrible schedules and they have no way of fighting the system. So, the administration is using their money wisely when they don’t hire full-time tenure-track faculty.

A Concerned Citizen

August 29th, 2009
7:32 pm

“Full-time tenure track faculty is expensive and they don’t guarantee good teaching, either. Part-time instructors can be cheap and it is very easy to abuse them by giving them horrible schedules and they have no way of fighting the system. So, the administration is using their money wisely when they don’t hire full-time tenure-track faculty.”

Full-time tenure-track faculty do cost more than part-time faculty, yet they are necessary to maintain quality instruction and a quality college experience for most students. Faculty salaries are going down, yet enrollments are increasing, so the money is in the budget for quality faculty. The money is being spent on construction and technology, not employees. I can’t prove my belief, but a I bet a lot of private contractors and administrators profiting nicely from the way things are. I wonder how long will it take for faculty (not those currently tenured and grandfathered in the system) to wake up and unionize?

A Concerned Citizen

August 29th, 2009
8:03 pm

“So, the administration is using their money wisely when they don’t hire full-time tenure-track faculty.”

Not all full-time, tenured faculty may be quality instructors, but they are essential to maintaining standards and a quality learning experience for the students. I argue that when it comes to assessing the performance of instructors within a field, who is better qualified to assess those instructors than the qualified experts in that field? And who is better qualified than the productive researchers and scholars of that field? Pedagogical understanding and technique are important, but often there is no substitute for extensive content knowledge, which does not come completely with a degree or credential: it is a process that requires a life-long commitment.

When I hear arguments for increasing the use of part-time faculty, I worry about the fates of the full-time students who pay for “instruction-on-the-run” from a teacher who has little or no stake in the system, or does not have to worry about making a living from teaching. Such an instructor should not in his right mind be expected to work for nothing, and any future teaching aspirant with any sense would not prepare for a career as an teacher or academic.

Nobody wants to think about what sort of effect this trend will have on public and higher education, and no one seems to notice how our tax monies are being laundered away from public servants (i.e., the staff and faculty) and into the hands of private contractors.

citizen

August 29th, 2009
8:05 pm

Not all full-time, tenured faculty may be quality instructors, but they are essential to maintaining standards and a quality learning experience for the students. I argue that when it comes to assessing the performance of instructors within a field, who is better qualified to assess those instructors than the qualified experts in that field? And who is better qualified than the productive researchers and scholars of that field? Pedagogical understanding and technique are important, but often there is no substitute for extensive content knowledge, which does not come completely with a degree or credential: it is a process that requires a life-long commitment.

When I hear arguments for increasing the use of part-time faculty, I worry about the fates of the full-time students who pay for “instruction-on-the-run” from a teacher who has little or no stake in the system, or does not have to worry about making a living from teaching. Such an instructor should not in his right mind be expected to work for nothing, and any future teaching aspirant with any sense would not prepare for a career as an teacher or academic.

Nobody wants to think about what sort of effect this trend will have on public and higher education, and no one seems to notice how our tax monies are being laundered away from public servants (i.e., the staff and faculty) and into the hands of private contractors.

jim

August 29th, 2009
8:06 pm

Not all full-time, tenured faculty may be quality instructors, but they are essential to maintaining standards and a quality learning experience for the students. I argue that when it comes to assessing the performance of instructors within a field, who is better qualified to assess those instructors than the qualified experts in that field? And who is better qualified than the productive researchers and scholars of that field? Pedagogical understanding and technique are important, but often there is no substitute for extensive content knowledge, which does not come completely with a degree or credential: it is a process that requires a life-long commitment.

When I hear arguments for increasing the use of part-time faculty, I worry about the fates of the full-time students who pay for “instruction-on-the-run” from a teacher who has little or no stake in the system, or does not have to worry about making a living from teaching. Such an instructor should not in his right mind be expected to work for nothing, and any future teaching aspirant with any sense would not prepare for a career as an teacher or academic.

Nobody wants to think about what sort of effect this trend will have on public and higher education, and no one seems to notice how our tax monies are being laundered away from public servants (i.e., the staff and faculty) and into the hands of private contractors.

Gerald

August 29th, 2009
8:10 pm

Not all full-time, tenured faculty may be quality instructors, but they are essential to maintaining standards and a quality learning experience for the students. I argue that when it comes to assessing the performance of instructors within a field, who is better qualified to assess those instructors than the qualified experts in that field? And who is better qualified than the productive researchers and scholars of that field? Pedagogical understanding and technique are important, but often there is no substitute for extensive content knowledge, which does not come completely with a degree or credential: it is a process that requires a life-long commitment.

When I hear arguments for increasing the use of part-time faculty, I worry about the fates of the full-time students who pay for “instruction-on-the-run” from a teacher who has little or no stake in the system, or does not have to worry about making a living from teaching. Such an instructor should not in his right mind be expected to work for nothing, and any future teaching aspirant with any sense would not prepare for a career as an teacher or academic.

Nobody wants to think about what sort of effect this trend will have on public and higher education, and no one seems to notice how our tax monies are being laundered away from public servants (i.e., the staff and faculty) and into the hands of private contractors.

The Sarge

August 29th, 2009
10:31 pm

5K in 30 minutes? That’s a low crawl, Dad. More importantly, Dad, this “taxing goal” may be indicative of the perpetual dumbing-down of that which our educational systems demand from kids/young pre-adults. Awarding the kid an A (supposedly a symbol indicating excellence) for running a mile, three times, in just over 9 1/2 minutes per is tantamount to giving him an A in physics because he spelled it without the F. Be afraid, Dad…afraid that your sons may be getting the watered-down education for which this Country is famous.

Autoteacher

August 29th, 2009
10:32 pm

A few years back I taught as an adjunct instructor at one of the state’s biggest Technical Colleges. The lead instructor did not meet the contact hour requirements for the course and we discussed it often. He quit the next year. The new instructor discovered the hours requiremnets and soon was doing the right things to bring the course into compliance.
I continued to teach at night. The supervisor for the night classes NEVER checked on my class. Most night classes left at 8-8:30 pm and I was alone in the buliding with my students and the security officers. We were suspposed to teach/hold class until 10 pm each night. That was a joke! None of the adjuncts did the required hours those years I was there. I taught the course and the hours required because I enjoyed the teaching.
I learned the expression “They pretend to pay and I pretend to teach”

This is the way of technical colleges by hiring adjunct teachers with very little requirements, low pay and almost no training in how to teach.
Students suffer, colleges make lots of money and the rest is BS.
Look at the requirements to teach at a Tech nical college in the trade section. Then look at what it takes to teach the same trade in a high school.
What is wrong with this picture?

Reality 4

August 29th, 2009
11:57 pm

citizen, Jim, and/or Gerald,

So, why is it good enough for K-12 kids to get those non-experts as teachers? Our schools are filled with those non-experts. At what point do we say such research qualification is essential?

georgia

August 30th, 2009
7:43 am

so if we are paying all this money on education in GA, how come our SAT scores are among the lowest in the country?

ScienceTeacher671

August 30th, 2009
11:14 am

georgia, we aren’t necessarily paying so much for K-12 education (look at the Obamas, paying about $30K per year for each of their elementary-aged daughters)….

However, our SAT scores are “among the lowest in the country” in part because the majority of our high school students take the SAT, when only the top students take the SAT in most states.

Laura

August 30th, 2009
7:20 pm

This opinion above would be what would be expected of this state and tech school to again try to make Sara Castle into some type of awful student for calling out the administration. Witnesses were called from Sara Castle’s side and the students from the nursing class were called. Everyone of them said that Sara Castle was not disruptive to the learning enviroment and that Sara Castle was a kind and very helpful person who assisted in Study groups and was helpful to other students in every possible way and like a mother figure to the students.

Also a former teacher was called by Sara Castle’s attourney who said that Sara Castle was a kind excellent student who was not afraid to question authority but was never a problem and was an inquisitive excellent student. Sara Castle made straight A’s and 2 B’s her entire schooling period with ethics grades of Meets expectations and exceeds expectations. Sara Castle was on the PRESIDENTS LIST. There was one small time when learning Math Sara Castle had a problem and recieved a 1 in ethics for (asking to many questions).

The defendants could have called the teachers or students who they now claim made these allegations of Sara Castle but they did not. That makes you wonder and they did not cross examine the students who were brougth . The students in this particular class would have loved to speak thier peace about this college but due to the states many filings to suppress evidence and objections to this and that . The truth could not be told as even worse that what has been out here.

If it were told this college would have had to pay in my opinion a whole lot more and the offer they speak of was never solidified and who in thier right mind would trust the same administrators who have been moved to other positions and the schools have all merged.

I hope this deters these administrators and others to be careful with students and treat them and teachers under the rules of the United States Constitution. Perhaps these administrators would have been wise to realize that the FEAR they ruled this school with was gone once the students had finished and were free of this school. The only weapon that the administrators had in this situation was to control the students by fear with, you will be kicked out if you tell and then made thier example by kicking out Sara Castle . The state had plenty of opportunity to bring in any teacher who said that Sara Castle was disruptive but they did not bring ONE NOT ONE and Yes it would have been allowed.

The rest of the students were told they would be kicked out if they spoke of it.

The school ruled the roost in believing that no one would dare challenge them or that these students from the mountains would never bring a lawsuit against them . The state was relentless in pursusing this case and finally Justice prevailed. This is my opinion

SANDI

August 31st, 2009
2:06 am

I’d love to go to this school and finish my nursing career. The instructors don’t give a rat’s tail and I’d still be able to sit for state boards and pass to get my RN drgree!! whoo hoo!!!!