Education experts react to SAT scores: We must do better

Here is some of the reaction around the country to the SAT scores. I will add as I receive more reaction.

“Even though more students are taking the SAT and are showing an interest in college, scores are not rising at the rates states would like to see. This should be a call to action for improving reading and writing instruction in the middle grades and high school. States need to develop college- and career-readiness standards to help teachers and students understand the precise levels of skill and knowledge that students need to be prepared for college and career training.” David Spence, president of the Southern Regional Education Board

“More students took the SAT than ever before, and even more importantly, more students of color. These students are demonstrating growing expectations about attending college; now the nation must make sure that their increased expectations are met with improved education results.  But much more work is needed if the nation is to meet the president’s goal of leading the world in college graduates. In the next few months, increasing financial aid will be critically important for Congress, but the SAT results show that it is equally important to increase the academic quality of the nation’s high school students so they are better prepared to succeed in college and careers.” Former West Virginia Gov. Bob Wise, president of the Washington-based Alliance for Excellent Education

“It is becoming increasingly clear that the nation cannot test its way to better educational quality or equity. The top-down, one-size-fits-all mandates of No Child Left Behind and state testing programs should be repealed and replaced with genuine reforms that build school capacity to address student learning needs.” Bob Schaeffer, FairTest public education director

11 comments Add your comment

Dunwoody Mom

August 25th, 2009
12:15 pm

I gotta laugh……..” This should be a call to action for improving reading and writing instruction in the middle grades and high school. States need to develop college- and career-readiness standards to help teachers and students understand the precise levels of skill and knowledge that students need to be prepared for college and career training.”

So, what exactly was “No Child Left Behind”?

Katy Johnston

August 25th, 2009
12:27 pm

SAT scores should not show how successful high schools are. Like it or not though, SATs are used by colleges for acceptance. We can talk about how we want to change that all day, but at the end of the day colleges still want high SAT scores. Kids SAT scores can be improved by just a little effort from the kid and the parents – my kids scores went up from tutoring (C2). If the schools aren’t teaching the SAT, which in my mind they shouldn’t be, its up to the families to take charge of their own child’s educational needs with after school tutoring.

DeKalb Conservative

August 25th, 2009
12:29 pm

Sounds like some pressure needs to be put on these kids to get their scores up, else they will be left behind in the post high school world.

Interested if there is a correlation between these two quotes: “Even though more students are taking the SAT and are showing an interest in college, scores are not rising at the rates states would like to see” and “More students took the SAT than ever before, and even more importantly, more students of color.”

Maureen's accountability metric

August 25th, 2009
12:33 pm

Is this blog eating, or censoring posts today?

FultonTeacher

August 25th, 2009
12:44 pm

Can we stop pushing for kids to go to college? So what if more students took the SAT. Nearly half are losing the HOPE their freshman year. We really need to help kids discover their strenghths and help them find a school that meets their needs. When did technical schools become a negative? We need hairstylists, mechanics, HVAC techs, carpenters, etc. Let’s be more realistic and scores will improve because students that are seriously interested in college will take the test, not just those that are “taking an interest” at the moment.

Seen it all

August 25th, 2009
1:25 pm

WHO CARES ABOUT THE SAT!!!!!! WHO???? WHO???? WHO????

That is all I have seen on this blog for the past 3 days- the SAT. Nobody cares. In fact we push TOO MANY students to take the SAT (which is what brings down Georgia’s overall averages) and tell too many students LIES about going to college. Reality is that FEW students actually go to four year colleges. Also most people don’t need to go to college. The whole college thing in this country is a SCAM and a FRAUD. Millions of people go to college for NOTHING. They end up doing work that does not require a college degree, either that or they are working out of the field they went to college for.

What I seldom see on this blog is ideas for reform of the public K-12 system. I see complaints from time to time about what teachers do or do not do or some other grievance about schools, but never any real discussion on improving education.

Maureen's accountability metric

August 25th, 2009
1:37 pm

Actually Seen It All, Maureen loves the SAT, if for no other reason it allows her to run away from questions about her own questionable reporting.

Is it true that Gatorade is going to do an ad campaign with her and Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt, with him sprinting toward a finish line and her sprinting away from journalistic credibility?

Dr. John Trotter

August 25th, 2009
4:20 pm

The definition for crazy is doing the same thing and getting the same results. Am I advocating a change in instruction or a change in the curricula or a change in the way the schools are organized or a change in the school schedules? No. As a society, we constantly change things, hoping that these changes will result in genuine student improvement on the SAT and other standardized tests. Do you remember the almighty middle school concept? What about block scheduling? New math? Sight reading? Whole language? Non-graded instruction? We could go on and on. Now the State is coming up with an even more biased and onerous teacher evaluative process which is subject to major administrative abuse. Why? Another attempt to bring about improvement. It’s not going to happen. The Law of the Large Numbers is a law, folk. Somewhat like The Law of Gravity. You have to change either who our students are or drastically change our current students’ attitudes toward rigorous academics. Just legislating more laws or passing more policies without addressing the students themselves is like spitting toward a Tsunami! You just end up with spit all over your face and clothes. But, no, no one wants to blame anything on the students or on their parents. This would not be very political, but it would be the truth. I will continue to quote Dr. Eugene Boyce, one of my professors nearly 30 years ago at UGA: “The motivation to learn is a social process.” It’s a motivatonal breakdown, not a technical breakdown. (c) MACE, August 25, 2009.

ScienceTeacher671

August 25th, 2009
6:08 pm

SAT scores don’t just reflect high schools…we get a lot of kids from the middle school who are only reading at a 5th or 6th grade level, but hey, they passed the CRCT!

what a crock

August 25th, 2009
7:39 pm

SAT…whatever. We have SPED kids taking the SAT becuase nobody bothered to tell them that having an IQ of 64 means they aren’t “college material”. Why do we keep lieing to these kids? Do we think they won’t ever figure it out? Or is it by the time they figure it out they are long gone from us? I am literally minutes away from telling my entire administration to “kiss my a$$” about the “standards” and all the other BS they keep stacking onto my already full plate. For those who say “quit whining”, “other people would love to have a job”, etc… you can also kiss my a$$ and you can also have my crappy job!

ScienceTeacher671

August 26th, 2009
6:04 pm

I had a student a few years ago – before they added the essay portion – bragging that s/he’d made a 485 on the SAT. Poor child didn’t realize it was not a good score.