Does the CRCT cheating scandal taint AYP?

Three elementary schools accused of cheating on last summer’s CRCT retest are among the 1,717 Georgia public schools that made federal testing goals this year.

Atlanta’s Deerwood Academy, DeKalb County’s Atherton Elementary, Fulton County’s Parklane Elementary made adequate yearly progress, also known as AYP. Burroughs-Molette Elementary in Glynn County did not and is a needs improvement school.

Adults at the four schools are accused of changing students’ answers on last summer’s fifth-grade CRCT math retest. The score were used last year to determine if schools made the goals mandated by the federal No Child Left Behind Act.

The improved scores allowed the schools to reach the goal, but the State Board of Education threw out those results last week.

The state has not made any allegations against the four schools regarding this year’s exams.

Still, the scandal has tainted this year’s AYP report for some. The state uses CRCT results to determine if elementary and middle schools met the federal standard.

“The cheating makes it hard to say if other schools really did OK,” one Atlanta parent told me yesterday. “Did other schools cheat? You have to wonder what it says about the mentality of the teachers and school system.”

Do you think this year’s AYP results are tainted?

NOTE: View the state’s AYP report here. You can also search for your school’s results using this AJC database.

39 comments Add your comment

Cheating for Rigor

July 15th, 2009
8:39 am

The cheating is everywhere. This was found on the Gainesville Times regarding Hall County Schools.

Graduation Games
Posted on July 15, 2009 by Hallconcern
Let’s take a closer look at AYP in our high schools. Graduation rates and the graduation tests are the big deal here as mentioned in the article. http://www.gainesvilletimes.com/news/article/21112/
It seems that there is now a practice (last 2 years or so) where the students who may be graduating without an actual diploma, but with a Certificate of Performance, (these students would count against the graduation rate and passing rates for the graduation tests and therefore AYP for the schools) are systematically being transferred to the Lanier Career Academy right before graduation (a matter of days in some cases).
This increases all the other 6 high school’s graduation rates artificially. The Career Academy is small and is never expected to do all that well any way so no biggie on AYP there. In fact on the State AYP site it reads “There are not enough students in this school for the AYP determination to be
statistically reliable, therefore an AYP determination has not been made for this
school.  These students are included in the District and State AYP reports.” in reference to the Career Academy. (http://public.doe.k12.ga.us/ayp2008/overview.asp?SchoolID=669-0105-a-1-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0)
Interesting. Let’s look at some numbers found on the Governor’s Office of  Student Achievement site regarding Hall County students receiving Certificates of Performance over the past few years now (  http://www.doe.k12.ga.us/ReportingFW.aspx?PageReq=111&PID=62&PTID=69&CountyId=669&T=0&FY=2008 )  (look under the Report card tab for each school and then under the “Indicators” tab for information on High School Completers).
Numbers for the 2005-06 school year for the Lanier Career Academy show 12 students graduating with a Certificates of Performance. In 2006-07 The Career Academy had 16 students graduating with a Certificates of Performance. In 2007-08 (the same year Hall County finally made AYP in all High Schools I believe) The Career Academy has a whopping 47 students graduating with a Certificates of Performance. Wow! What is that – something like a 48% increase from 2006-07? HOW DOES THAT HAPPEN?!
Good question. Let’s look at the other 6 High Schools now.
If you look at the 6 combined (excluding the Career Academy) in 2005-06 they had 97 students graduating with a Certificates of Performance. In 2006-07 the 6 reported 91 students graduating with a Certificates of Performance. In 2007-08 they reported 28, about a 48% decrease from the year before. Oh I see now. Tricky tricky!! It seems like they are transferring the kids that will hurt their scores to the Career Academy between the taking of the Graduation tests and actual graduation. Neat trick! Really helps to make that pass on AYP.
So in 2006-07 the Career Academy had 16 students out of the Hall County District’s 107 students receiving a Certificate of Performance. In 2007-08 The Career Academy had 47 out of the Hall County District’s 75 students receiving a Certificate of Performance. Unreal! Any statisticians out there want to compute those odds?
All schools were fairly consistent in their Certificate of Performance numbers between 2005-06 to 2006-07. However, from 2006-07 to 2007-08, West Hall High went from 17 students graduating with a Certificates of Performance down to 0. Johnson High went from 23 to 8. North Hall High stayed at 8 for both years (not going to pull that up there I guess). Chestatee High went from 17 to 2. Flowery Branch High went from 12 to 10 (after being at 19 the year prior) and East Hall High went from 14 to 0.
Haven’t looked at the numbers for 2008-09 yet, but I will bet quite a bit that they are low again at the 6 high schools and higher at the Career Academy as it seems they did the same thing.
Have to wonder how ethical this is? Is it cheating? Is it fraud?  You be the judge.
Also have to wonder if a disproportionate number of these students are economically disadvantaged, special needs or of a certain minority status.
And these folks want more freedom from oversight and rules. I guess so!
I also have to throw this in: A couple of articles this past week have reported that AYP and test scores are not the name of the game and are the wrong focus for the current Hall County School Superintendent and administration. Then why is the Superintendent currently at a conference on Jekyll Island this week presenting on better ways to hold teachers accountable based solely on CRCT scores?

Cheating for Rigor

July 15th, 2009
8:52 am

The cheating is everywhere. This came out of Hall County.

Graduation Games
Posted on July 15, 2009 by Hallconcern
Let’s take a closer look at AYP in our high schools. Graduation rates and the graduation tests are the big deal here as mentioned in the article. http://www.gainesvilletimes.com/news/article/21112/
It seems that there is now a practice (last 2 years or so) where the students who may be graduating without an actual diploma, but with a Certificate of Performance, (these students would count against the graduation rate and passing rates for the graduation tests and therefore AYP for the schools) are systematically being transferred to the Lanier Career Academy right before graduation (a matter of days in some cases).
This increases all the other 6 high school’s graduation rates artificially. The Career Academy is small and is never expected to do all that well any way so no biggie on AYP there. In fact on the State AYP site it reads “There are not enough students in this school for the AYP determination to be
statistically reliable, therefore an AYP determination has not been made for this
school.  These students are included in the District and State AYP reports.” in reference to the Career Academy. (http://public.doe.k12.ga.us/ayp2008/overview.asp?SchoolID=669-0105-a-1-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0)
Interesting. Let’s look at some numbers found on the Governor’s Office of  Student Achievement site regarding Hall County students receiving Certificates of Performance over the past few years now (  http://www.doe.k12.ga.us/ReportingFW.aspx?PageReq=111&PID=62&PTID=69&CountyId=669&T=0&FY=2008 )  (look under the Report card tab for each school and then under the “Indicators” tab for information on High School Completers).
Numbers for the 2005-06 school year for the Lanier Career Academy show 12 students graduating with a Certificates of Performance. In 2006-07 The Career Academy had 16 students graduating with a Certificates of Performance. In 2007-08 (the same year Hall County finally made AYP in all High Schools I believe) The Career Academy has a whopping 47 students graduating with a Certificates of Performance. Wow! What is that – something like a 48% increase from 2006-07? HOW DOES THAT HAPPEN?!
Good question. Let’s look at the other 6 High Schools now.
If you look at the 6 combined (excluding the Career Academy) in 2005-06 they had 97 students graduating with a Certificates of Performance. In 2006-07 the 6 reported 91 students graduating with a Certificates of Performance. In 2007-08 they reported 28, about a 48% decrease from the year before. Oh I see now. Tricky tricky!! It seems like they are transferring the kids that will hurt their scores to the Career Academy between the taking of the Graduation tests and actual graduation. Neat trick! Really helps to make that pass on AYP.
So in 2006-07 the Career Academy had 16 students out of the Hall County District’s 107 students receiving a Certificate of Performance. In 2007-08 The Career Academy had 47 out of the Hall County District’s 75 students receiving a Certificate of Performance. Unreal! Any statisticians out there want to compute those odds?
All schools were fairly consistent in their Certificate of Performance numbers between 2005-06 to 2006-07. However, from 2006-07 to 2007-08, West Hall High went from 17 students graduating with a Certificates of Performance down to 0. Johnson High went from 23 to 8. North Hall High stayed at 8 for both years (not going to pull that up there I guess). Chestatee High went from 17 to 2. Flowery Branch High went from 12 to 10 (after being at 19 the year prior) and East Hall High went from 14 to 0.
Haven’t looked at the numbers for 2008-09 yet, but I will bet quite a bit that they are low again at the 6 high schools and higher at the Career Academy as it seems they did the same thing.
Have to wonder how ethical this is? Is it cheating? Is it fraud?  You be the judge.
Also have to wonder if a disproportionate number of these students are economically disadvantaged, special needs or of a certain minority status.
And these folks want more freedom from oversight and rules. I guess so!
I also have to throw this in: A couple of articles this past week have reported that AYP and test scores are not the name of the game and are the wrong focus for the current Hall County School Superintendent and administration. Then why is the Superintendent currently at a conference on Jekyll Island this week presenting on better ways to hold teachers accountable based solely on CRCT scores?

Vince

July 15th, 2009
8:53 am

No, I don’t think what happened at a few schools last year changes the progress and triumphs of what other school did this year. When a college football team is accused of violations it doesn’t ruin college football for me. To tell you the truth, it perturbs me that people assume everyone is cheating just because a few schools out of thousands did so.

On a different note, AYP is a sham for other reasons. Schools give the CRCT to kids with IQ’s in the 50 – 70 range and also to kids who can’t speak English. Schools with special ed centers and heavy international populations don’t really stand a chance. We give the CRCT to students who cannot read, speak or hold a pencil and have an IQ of 60. Whoever wrote, and co-wrote, NCLB has no knowledge of education.

OldTeach

July 15th, 2009
11:36 am

VINCE’S 2nd paragraph is the says it all….almost.
Some of the students he mentions actually do pass the CRCT. Does that tell you how difficult the test really is.????? .or, does that tell you that something fishy is going on???…that a child who cannot speak or read English could pass? Does that tell you how outrageously uneducated the politicians and so-called “educators” are who actually signed off on this whole NCLB concept???

catlady

July 15th, 2009
11:45 am

Cheating for rigor: happens here too.

Vince/OldTeach: amen to you both. The CRCT is not a valid test.

Until we get the politicians and those who have not taught in the last 5 years OUT of the decision-making, policy-making arena, we will continue with this idiocy.

DeKalb Conservative

July 15th, 2009
12:59 pm

Vince–

Sorry, but you’re argument has no merit, pardon the pun.

What is wrong with pointing out kids with 50-70 range IQs and kids who cannot communicate in English are below average performers that do not meet minimal requirements?

Assuming the GA public schools takes a leadership role in their education, you are not doing the student a service by pandering to them and assuring them all things are okay. This will only set them up for failure as citizens and dramatically skew their expectations of what adult life has in store for them.

Playing into Vince’s trap, I wonder how adjusted numbers would look if you took out kids that have a 50-70 range IQ or cannot speak English. Would that dramatically change the outcome? I would be curious to see overlapping data of how important students view education is and see if there is a correlation to test scores.

Vince

July 15th, 2009
1:44 pm

Dekalb Conservative…… Perhaps I wasn’t clear. There is nothing wrong with identifying those who will never achieve at grade level, or those who will struggle to do so. The problem with NCLB is that it EXPECTS everyone to achieve at grade level and holds people accountable for making sure they do so.

Let’s suppose you are a basketball coach. The goal that your supervisor sets for you is to make sure all of your players can dunk the ball by the end of the season. In fact that is the goal set for all of the coaches in the league. Now at the gym down the street all of the players are over 6 feet tall. Other gyms also have tall, athletic players. For some reason, your gym was selected as one to assist players with special needs. Some of your players are very short, some even under four feet tall. Others are in wheelchairs and some can neither hear nor see. At the end of the season, you have done a great job of getting your players to progress in their skills yet none of them can dunk a ball….which was the goal set for the year. You’ve failed.

Now, as a result of your failure, your gym is held up very publicly to ridicule. Stories are written in the local newspaper about how your gym did a terrible job and your position as coach is in jeopardy.

Now, do you get it?

I am not aware of studies that show how students perform on the CRCT as correlated to their own views on education. I can tell you that the vast majority of students who do not score well on the CRCT are students with disabilities and students who are English language learners.

NCLB assumes all students are on a level playing field and that we should prepare everyone to go to college. For some students, we would do better to train them in a different direction.

Vince

July 15th, 2009
2:02 pm

Dekalb Conservative….. Perhaps I did not make myself clear. There is certainly nothing wrong with pointing out students who have special needs or those who struggle with their schooling. In fact, the problem with NCLB is that it pretends these students do not exist.

Look at it this way. Let’s pretend you are a basketball coach in a city parks league. The supervisor sets a goal for all of the coaches: You must teach all of your playerss to successfully dunk the ball before the season ends. Some of the parks in the league have been recruiting players for years. They have all of the tall, athletic players. Some parks have players of varying abilities. Back many years ago, your park was selected to house the program for special needs students. You have great, enthusiastic, respectful kids in your program. You love them to death, but some are in wheelchairs, some are blind and/or deaf and some are extremely short.

You work very hard with these kids during the season and they make great progress, but at the end of the year, not a single one of them can dunk the ball. You failed. Your position as coach is in jeopardy and the local newspaper holds you, your kids, and your community up to very public ridicule. They of course make no mention of your demographics.

Now, do you get it? NCLB wants schools to cure ailments within a 10 year time frame that medical science has been unable to cure in 100+ years.

You see, Dekalb Conservative, NCLB preaches exactly what you appear to be opposed to. It pretends that all students are equal and capable of achieving at grade level. Thus, schools must respond by trying to prepare all kids for college….when, for some students, it would be more valuable to train them in another direction.

I do not know of any studies that attempt to correlate CRCT performance to a student’s attitude about school. I can tell you that the vast majority of students who do not pass the CRCT are either special needs or English language learners.

DeKalb Conservative

July 15th, 2009
4:12 pm

Vince-

You make an excellent example. However I think it is too simple to just look at this from special need v. non special needs. This does a particular disservice when looking at this from a racial v. behavioral standpoint.

The fact remains that many schools in traditionally black areas are under performing. This leads the conclusion that students in these schools are either:
1. intellectually inferior due to biology
2. intellectually inferior due to behavior

By suggesting the need to correlate CRCT performance to a student’s attitude about schools I am giving the benefit of the doubt that education is not limited due to biology. To say students have intellectual equality potential from a biological standpoint means the lack of a student to achieve, including meeting minimum requirements, has to be related to other variables that result from their actions.

My hypothesis is that too many students in these under performing schools do not hold education as a high value. To not make the student accountable and understand the repercussions of his under performance is cheat that student of a realistic understanding of what his adult life will look like.

You’re example about dunking a basketball is interesting, because it plays so well into biological factors. Giving a pass to a 10th grader that reads at a 4th grade level, but doesn’t have a 50-70 IQ is dishonest at best. Statistically speaking–all of these students cannot be classified as biologically special needs, but you can classify many as being dumb.

Being dumb (under performing) can be fixed, but being special needs is forever.

Cere

July 15th, 2009
5:51 pm

I’m sorry. You may not know this, but only 68.9% of DeKalb County schools made AYP. Only 39% of Dekalb’s high schools made AYP. Yes, we have plenty of special education students (probably 10-12%) however, they didn’t single-handedly take down our scores. Our schools failed in these categories: black, Hispanic, students with disabilities, students with limited English skills and economically disadvantaged. Please don’t lay all of the AYP failure on students with disabilities. I’m a firm believer that, while not at the same level, all students can learn. And I will agree that it isn’t helpful to “fail” an entire school because of the performance of one sub-group. The failure of one sub-group should be a golden opportunity to hone in on helping out students in that sub-group, not a golden opportunity for anyone in the building to transfer to another school.

ScienceTeacher671

July 15th, 2009
6:28 pm

I’m still trying to figure out how a middle school where almost half the 8th graders failed the math CRCT could make AYP.

where is jim d?

July 15th, 2009
7:18 pm

hopefully on a looooong vacation!

OldTeach

July 15th, 2009
7:43 pm

CERE…All children of course can learn. However, not at the same rate and maybe not the same material. THat’s why the CRCT tests are of so little value. Progress of any and all students can only be shown if the SAME students are tested to show where they are BEFORE instruction and then tested again AFTER INSTRUCTION . Those scores would show progress [or none] for all groups/subgroups. THe Secretary of Education , Margaret Spelling, visited Atlanta a couple of years ago and at the request of several teachers, an AJC editor asked why the CRCT were not conducted in this way. She saie,”We’re working on it !” I don’t think she even understood the question !!!

OldTeach

July 15th, 2009
8:02 pm

My post of 10 minutes ago must have fallen into the AJC abyss of lost posts!

Vince

July 15th, 2009
8:32 pm

Cere….students can appear in more than one subgroup. For whatever reason, most Dekalb students who fall into the SWD subgroup also show up as black and economically disadvantaged. Most English language learners, hispanic included, also fall into the economically disadvantaged subgroup. No one would dispute the glorious, and oft used “all students can learn” mantra. The real question is: Can all students perform at grade level? NCLB requires that they do so.

Vince

July 15th, 2009
8:35 pm

Also Cere, and perhaps your comments were not aimed at me, I was not attempting to explain Dekalb’s or anyone’s scores. I was merely trying to explain the absurdity of AYP and NCLB. Anyone who truly believes all students can achieve at grade level is obviously living in La La Land.

Will they finish the job?

July 15th, 2009
8:50 pm

Will the AJC continue to report on the story, until every system involved admits responsibility and the appropriate sanctions are put in place? And will the public insist that the media continue to report the story until the DOE has no choice but to take the appropriate action?

DeKalb County Gets Schooled

July 15th, 2009
11:05 pm

Did the legal mouthpiece for DeKalb County schools really think they could stop citizens from commenting on the actions of DeKalb County administrators by mailing a cease and desist letter?

I’m sure DeKalb County schools wish that people would forget certain inconvenient truths, but really, do DeKalb County officials expect the entire judicial system to suddenly forget the First Amendment?

Cere

July 15th, 2009
11:12 pm

I think we all agree on the absurdity of the goals of NCLB – that all students perform at grade level. And yes, the mantra, all children can learn is true – of course at different levels. We should value people for the level they can achieve. NCLB doesn’t do this – you are either labeled a failure or a success. The failures know who they are – which makes them feel even more of a failure. It’s a vortex of fear, hurt, blame, name-calling and jealousy that we just don’t need to promote. Identifying students who need more assistance is important. That’s the only good thing NCLB does. The punitive aspects can go away at any time…

Cere

July 15th, 2009
11:14 pm

What cease and desist letter? Did I miss something?

Super Dad

July 15th, 2009
11:16 pm

Those test are incredibly easy to pass. If our schools have to cheat to show improvement, it only means that Georgia has an extra high number of retarded children – probably reared by retarded parents. Maybe they can move to India and hand clean sewer lines when the Indians dominate the world.

OldTeach

July 15th, 2009
11:26 pm

CERE I think the cease and desist letter mentioned above must be the one that Crawford Lewis sent to all Dekalb employees telling them they should support [call, send notes etc. ] the two cheating principals [since arrested] because they had been of great service to the school system.

OldTeach

July 15th, 2009
11:28 pm

the Cease and desist letter mentioned above must be the one Crawford Lewis sent to all school employees telling them they should support the 2 cheating principals [call, send notes, etc] because the two had been of great service to Dekalb.

OldTeach

July 15th, 2009
11:29 pm

sorry about the double post.

teacher

July 15th, 2009
11:33 pm

Every teacher knows that AYP is a sham. Most teachers in lower- income areas choose to be there, to try to make a difference and yet they become stigmatized for opting to work in low-performing schools. As Vince stated, many students fit into more than one measured group: as free/reduced lunch (income), as minority, as English language learners, etc. One student can “ding” a school 3+ times. Schools without minority or special ed. populations often seem smug about CRCT scores, however minority, special ed., free/reduced lunch, ELL are usually the categories that keep many schools from meeting AYP…and another thing…”No Child Left Behind” is political garbage. Most citizens don’t even understand how it works. Who would actually vote to leave a child behind? Let’s throw out the misleading name of the program and be sure that the public AND politicians understand what it is about!

Dr. Craig Spinks /Evans

July 15th, 2009
11:53 pm

If one thinks that there is cheating now with the administration of the much-less-than-rigorous CRCT, just wait until more rigorous tests with more certain and serious consequences for students and educators are administered to all our elementary- and middle-school students under business and/or federal pressure.

T

July 16th, 2009
12:10 am

Cheating happens all the time in MOST schools. Why is everyone so shocked? Administrators care much more about their image, money, and power than the students they were supposed to serve. That’s just the way it is. Now….who’s gonna do something about it???

ScienceTeacher671

July 16th, 2009
1:08 am

Right now the biggest scandal is that the DOE sets the standards on the CRCT so low that a student several years below grade level is deemed “proficient”…

…and the second biggest scandal is that we have so many students (who are not diagnosed as special needs or English language learners) who can’t even reach that low bar.

Sandy Trammell

July 16th, 2009
3:49 am

It is very disheartening that not only are the students suffering from test anxiety, but obviously it has progressed to the administrators. What a poor example this sets by those we put our trust in to help mold our children.

WTF

July 16th, 2009
4:54 am

Cheating is everywhere. Why do the department of education give the GHST on different days? Let me explain..A school in Fayette County takes the Social Studies GHST on Tues. After the test is over, the teacher takes up the test and go over the answers with students. (seems harmless). Ok, on the following day, the SAME EXACT test is given to a local county school. The students in Fayette County shares the answers with a local county school and guess what they pass the test with flying colors…. Please fix this, give the same test to each school on the same day.

Tia

July 16th, 2009
6:50 am

Welcome to the corruption in the Georgia school systems!!! Do you know that teachers can have criminal records and still teach in Georgia? Just look on the Georgia Professional Standards website at what is NOT considered moral turpitude: THIS IS ALLOWED and you can keep your certification EVEN If you are convicted!

Public drunkenness
Driving under the influence
Carrying a concealed weapon
Unlawful sale of liquor
Fighting
Simple Battery
Simple Assault
Misdemeanor criminal trespass
Child abandonment
Misdemeanor offense of escape
Misdemeanor offense of obstructing a law enforcement officer
The federal misdemeanor offense of Conspiracy in Restraint of Interstate Trade and Commerce
Possession of less than one ounce of marijuana

No wonder we have so many cheaters!!! We have teachers and administrators of very LOW MORAL character. The fish stinks from the head.

socialismsux

July 16th, 2009
7:20 am

Stupid, cheating teachers send stupid, cheating students into the world, who then teach more stupid, cheating dummies. The teachers should be sued and arrested. We are being taxed to death to pay for this theft.

InAtlanta

July 16th, 2009
7:53 am

What this really reflects is the lack of authority the Gov. and State Dept. of Ed. have over the school systems. Those people involved in the GATEWAY scandal with Alvin know all to well how D.A.’s like Porter do not investigate alleged wrong doings. Superintendents are allowed to pay off employees in the know with $5000 raises. There is no telling what went on in the city of Atlanta school system.

InAtlanta

July 16th, 2009
8:12 am

What this really show is the lack of authority the Gov. and State dept. have of the schools. Those of us involved in the GATEWAY scandal know all to well how D.A.’s like Porter do little to investigate wrong doing. Employees in the know are given $5000 raise to keep their mouths shut! There is no telling what is going on in the City of Atlanta Schools.

DeKalb Conservative

July 16th, 2009
9:40 am

I remember when I was attending school they broke us out into different levels. There where 3 distinct levels for reading (slow, medium advanced) and two levels for math (regular and advanced). Looking back what was great about this is that it helped let students know where they stood. On occasion you would have a student go from slow to medium, or from medium to slow depending on the pace that student was able to keep up with.

Bottom line- The excitement for some the the successes the readers have expressed here is pathetic. Equally pathetic is some of the excuses. Students need to be taught how to communicate and how to be analytical. This is regardless of career path. Giving a pass to sub groups based on stereotypes is unacceptable.

The only sub group exceptions should be:
1. first generation English speakers (it is normal that second generation immigrants assimilate, but can be difficult for first)
2. special education (by definition this would be biological, not a star high school athlete that reads at a 4th grade level)

I fail to see how giving a pass on Hispanics (non-first generation / non-English speaking), blacks (for some reason there is a stereotype that being smart and studying equates to “acting white”) and low income (the American dream is built around each generation being a little better than the previous).

I might have just opened myself as a target, which is acceptable. Before you do this, explain why people are not talking about Asians as a sub group. Perhaps because as a sub group Asians tend to be higher performers.

Vince

July 16th, 2009
9:58 am

Some of the people who post on here are really remarkably stupid.

abacus2

July 16th, 2009
10:42 pm

I am a Georgia teacher who believes that the CRCT is a waste of time and resources. Our students need to be evaluated by a nationally normed test, not the “home-made” test we use where answering 50% of the questions correctly rates a proficient. Over 30% of Georgia college freshman need to take remedial math and English before they can take college classes for credit. That is pathetic!
My recommendation is to put teaching back in the hands of the teachers and give them the support they need with discipline issues. My principal has done this and my students are benefitting.

donnether

July 25th, 2009
6:10 am

Whats the name of your school because I need to be there? A principal who does the right thing for his teachers and students, how refreshing. I am so glad to hear this happens because for a minute I did not think this happened anywhere. You should thank your principal for making wise decisions that benefits everyone involved.

karmabottle

July 25th, 2009
2:02 pm

I see some very good comments from the soldiers (teachers) who are in the trenches. I also see some of the usual “teachers stink” comments from those who have never taught a day in their lives….mmmm. Nice.

I want to point out that it is indeed unreasonable to expect a child with an IQ of 70 to perform as well as a child of average or high intelligence. As an ESL teacher, I also do not believe that it is equitable to ask a child who has studied English for two years to perform as well as his native English-speaking peers on an all-English test.

I would agree with the person who wrote that a nationally normed test would be more useful to compare apples to apples. Even then, we would still be comparing apples and oranges for certain sub-groups. NCLB sounds good on paper, but doesn’t play out very well in life.

I think most teachers are working ourselves to death to help kids. I know we had a great year with the ELL students in our middle school, but do I feel it is a good assessment of their language and learning skills? No. I think we can do better than the CRCT. However, I must admit, having worked in public schools for years, I am starting to think we need to follow others countries’ leads by using more of a tracking system. There are some students who do not have the propensity for academics, and you can tell by 7th or 8th grade. Those kids *need* a different type of school experience to prepare them for where they will go in life. It is a shame that we assess kids the same way and force them into a mold that is not one-size-fits-all. The problem is bigger than the CRCT in that sense: we need an educational model overhaul because all students are not created equal (thanks to the forces of biology and most importantly the home).

Super dad wrote that the CRCT is a very easy test. I’d be curious to know how you came to know what is on a CRCT test without having taken it yourself?