Waiting for CRCT results

The Georgia Department of Education won’t release official CRCT results for several more weeks, but some Georgia school districts are starting to share their preliminary scores.

The results are mixed.

Districts showing gains in reading say students continue to struggle in math. But systems where math scores have gone up are reporting that reading scores are mixed.

It’s too soon to know whether we’ll have a repeat of last year’s debacle.

In 2008, the state threw out CRCT social studies scores for students in sixth- and seventh-grade saying there was a disconnect between the standards, the test and what teachers taught. About 71 percent of sixth-graders and 76 percent of seventh-graders failed last year.

The state rewrote some of the standards, redid the test and gave teachers more training. The state field-tested the revamped exam for sixth- and seventh-graders this year, meaning students’ scores won’t count.

Math scores also tanked last year. About 38 percent of eighth-graders failed the math test, which was based on revamped curriculum.

State officials say the curriculum is more rigorous and test scores will improve as teachers become more comfortable with the material.

We’ll have to see if that happens this year.

Parents, how did your child do this year? Teachers and principals, how did your class and school do?

52 comments Add your comment

Reality

May 21st, 2009
9:13 am

Any news for high schools? EOCT? GHSGT?

GATEACH

May 21st, 2009
9:50 am

I teach in Forsyth County. My school had 99% pass reading, and 95% pass math. That is good, but when you take in consideration that “passing” with an 800 is getting 50% correct, it somewhat brings thing back to reality.

Lisa B.

May 21st, 2009
9:52 am

The EOCT for Math I doesn’t count this year. (First year of the new curriculum… the kids who are on block schedule who took the test in December didn’t perform well.) I am pretty annoyed with the “new math.” My 9th grade son has had “new math” for four straight years now. I realize it will get better when the teachers have experience with the curriculum, but I can tell my son has been hurt by four years of teachers who are learning something new. His Accelerated Math I teacher barely had any materials to work with! Next year, the “new” Math II rolls out, and once again, my son gets to be a guinea pig for the new curriculum.

Lisa B.

May 21st, 2009
9:54 am

Forsyth County is one of three school systems in GA where ALL the schools have made AYP every year for the last four or five years. Way to go!

high school teacher

May 21st, 2009
9:58 am

Lisa B, unfortunately, your son will be the guinea pig with math until he graduates.

I don’t know about middle school CRCT results for our county yet. I got my 2nd grader’s scores, but that’s it.

high school teacher

May 21st, 2009
9:59 am

That should say “elementary and middle school.”

jim d

May 21st, 2009
10:08 am

Do these results really matter?

Personally, I think not. Should the state not like what they see they are subject to throw them out again.

What a waste of assets! Furloughing teachers, cutting budgets to the bone, and eliminating services to maintain a bogus test? What the hell are they thinking?

Classroom Teacher

May 21st, 2009
10:13 am

“What the hell are they thinking?”
`
Thats the problem, they aren’t. Oh at least not thinking smart. Kind of makes you wonder about these impressive looking sheepskins you see on the wall of some of the bigwigs in academia.

VOICE

May 21st, 2009
10:19 am

Jim d, This is really getting out of hand. We are agreeing entirely too much!

jim d

May 21st, 2009
10:22 am

classroom teach,

Unfortunately most of the populace is apparently blind or hasn’t the spine to un-elect the powers that be, and who are responsible for the travestity of dumbing down our student population with these redundant meaningless tests.

With teachers now getting on board, speaking out against this crap, perhaps we have a glimmer of hope at taking our public educational system back.

jim d

May 21st, 2009
10:23 am

Voice,

Guess i need to stay out from under the sun lamps. :)

VOICE

May 21st, 2009
10:25 am

Now, I know that something is seriously wrong! This can’t be happening. I’m agreeing with Classroom Teacher, too!? I must be loosing my mind. Time for a vacation.

VOICE

May 21st, 2009
10:33 am

OOPs, losing. :)

Danteach

May 21st, 2009
10:38 am

I want to get rid of the school boards. Most of them don’t have a clue about education. They make everything so hard to do. And how exactly are they elected? And how many terms are they allowed to stay on a board?

jim d

May 21st, 2009
10:45 am

Dan,

In Gwinnett county Louise Radloff will have represented District 5 for 40 years at the end of her current term.

Personally I find it rather disturbing that someone can in all reality be elected for life on a BOE.

Lisa B.

May 21st, 2009
10:48 am

Once again, there are no Social Studies scores for 6th and 7th grade. I wish the teachers could at least get SOME feedback. Sigh.

Many Southwest GA school systems are in the process of remediating the 3rd, 5th and 8th grade students who failed reading, math or both on April’s CRCT. Since so many systems have eliminated summer school, students will retest before the teachers leave for the year.

jim d

May 21st, 2009
10:50 am

Dan,

Allow me to elucidate on my previous comment.

Mrs. Radloff is, in my opionon, the only one on the GCBOE that is worth re-electing.

Danteach

May 21st, 2009
11:52 am

Thanks, Jim D. I find it absurd that a person can sit on a board for that long. What about new ideas? Most people after that long is set in their ways.

That is part of the problem with the school board. How can you still be relevant after that long on a school board?

Tony

May 21st, 2009
11:59 am

To all of you who think we spend entirely too much money, time, and energy on assinine tests – hurray for you. These tests are destroying our children’s futures because they do more to cause schools to dumb down the classes than any other single factor.

Please understand that these tests have been instituted at the insistence of our politicians and business leaders. They understand two things – votes and money. You can speak with both.

Lisa B.

May 21st, 2009
12:46 pm

I agree with Tony that testing has destroyed education. Testing doesn’t require problem-solving or analytical skills. However, teachers are held accountable for test scores, so teachers must teach students to excel at multiple choice format tests. Rote memory work is pretty much worthless for anything other that standardized test prep. We all know that, have known it for years, yet here we are, spending almost the entire school day on teaching methods that don’t help kids. Thanks a lot, No Child Left Behind.

jim d

May 21st, 2009
12:51 pm

Tony,

“we spend entirely too much money, time, and energy on assinine tests”

Thanks–a message I’ve been preaching for about 10 years now.

Dr, Craig Spinks/ Evans, GA

May 21st, 2009
1:35 pm

Why has the GDOE not released preliminary CRCT scores to The Public- you know, those folks who pay the freight?

flipper

May 21st, 2009
2:22 pm

OMG… I haaaaatttee NCLB. It is absolutely the worst thing that has happened to education. We are losing an entire generation to this idiotic law. We will have Generation X, Generation Y, the Millennium Generation and Generation NCLB.

All the other generations are going to be thrilled that they have to support Generation NCLB because all they can do is answer low level multiple choice questions. They won’t be able to think their way out of a cardboard box!

DB

May 21st, 2009
3:09 pm

Hooray for private schools – thank GOD my kids never had to take that stupid CRCT! All that fuss and pressure on kids, all the Sturm und Dang for what is basically a school report card.

Tony

May 21st, 2009
4:35 pm

Sturm und Dang — I love it!

TW

May 21st, 2009
4:39 pm

My kid goes to school in Cobb and his teachers/administration do a great job of protecting the kids from state mandated crap like this CRCT. Yes, they take it, and do very well on it, but the bar is set much higher, the teaching is not dumbed down.

Real shame when the individual school has to protect itself from those above who are SUPPOSED to be helping them.

Oh, and for those schools having trouble – wait until next year. The land of the tax cuts has resulted in the rape of the public school system. While that might bring a smile to the rightwingers, the lack of funding will no doubt be very evident in next year’s testing, as cuts will be felt the most by the kids.

Get what you pay for.

catlady

May 21st, 2009
6:00 pm

We will see gains this year, I predict, because the tests have been dumbed down even further. I don’t mean adjusting the cut scores (altho that may have happened, too), but changing the tests to make them easier. Just watch. This is NOT speculation!

lily

May 21st, 2009
7:50 pm

As a middle school social studies teacher, I am very disappointed that the social studies scores are not released. We do have a right to know as do students. In reference to “dumbing down” the curriculum, that’s a fact. Most parents are only interested in having that “honor student bumper sticker” and put up such a fuss when a teacher really gives the kid the grade they deserve. The parents raise hell with the administrator and due to the pressure that comes down, the teacher caves- everybody’s happy. Another problem is grade inflation.

ScienceTeacher671

May 21st, 2009
7:51 pm

catlady, I agree totally with your 6:00 p.m. post.

Lee

May 21st, 2009
7:53 pm

Ho hum…

Different year – same results.

School administrators and the politically correct will get their panties in a wad once again because a couple of sub-groups didn’t pass a silly test. And they will yammer and hem and haw about standards and teaching methods and never once acknowledge that the equal outcomes based education model is a dismal failure.

In another week, this school year will mercifully be over for most.

V. D.

May 21st, 2009
9:22 pm

Fulton County 3rd grader at my house got results, didn’t make the cut in reading. So, gotta do the three weeks of summer school, and for what? What can they accomplish in three weeks, with school starting at 8:00am and ending at 11:00am?! The State of Georgia deserves a failing grade while I am actively searching for a private school for the fall.

dbow

May 22nd, 2009
8:10 am

I am so proud of my students! 99% pass rate on the 7th grade math CRCT. The one that didn’t pass was and still is a pos that could care less about anything and everybody. Oh well. I agree that the test is waaaay over hyped, but we do need some form of test that shows growth. It isn’t perfect, but it can be usefull in determining what areas are strong and which need improvement. I had a very large group of students come back to me and THANKED me for NOT answering every question they had. They hated it during school, but realized that when I made them figure answers out on their own, they were forced to use skills they never knew they had. The test doesn’t measure critical thinking or problem solving skills, but you can do it everyday in the classroom. Thanks kids!!

Reality

May 22nd, 2009
8:33 am

Before everyone jumps on me, hear me out please….

Testing is not inherently a bad thing. I feel that it is important to have a single “across the board” assessment to compare how students are progressing. This is important if for no other reason than to remediate in areas that are identified as lacking for the student.

The problem that testing has is that PEOPLE tend to mis-understand and mis-use the testing data and results. For example, principals tend to look at how the students of a particular teacher scored and think that this is a measure of the teacher abilities – it is NOT! The test doesn’t measure teacher ability.

It is the mis-use and mis-understanding that makes the testing seem ‘bad’ and not the test or test results themselves.

AG

May 22nd, 2009
9:32 am

DB, it appears that you are happy about sending your children to private schools. That’s fine, but I have a question for you — did you attend public or private schools? I attended public schools, and I picked up on an error in your post. It’s “Sturm und Drang”, not “Sturm und Dang” as you posted.

AlreadySheared

May 22nd, 2009
12:28 pm

Us bein’ in the South, maybe it IS “Sturm und Dang”. If it’s not, maybe it should be.

freemarketeducator

May 22nd, 2009
3:06 pm

dbow
A 99% pass rate in 7th grade math is quite an accomplishment. Could you give us some demographics and reasons why your class did so well? What are your teaching methods? Perhaps others could take notes and continue the success in their classroom. The government wastes millions of dollars to try to find these answers. On the blog, we can do it for free!

dbow

May 22nd, 2009
3:41 pm

As I remind the new teachers I see every year, teaching isn’t the rocket science they think it is. I use tried and true teaching methods that worked for me when I was in school and if I can learn, anyone can. I hold them accountable for their education and make them do the leg work. They ask me questions and I ask them how can THEY find the answer. I put it back on them as often as I can. They can ask me all the intelligent questions they want, but that doesn’t mean they’re going to get an answer every time. Some of the kids learn easy and some learn kicking and screaming and dragging their feet all the way, but they all learn something. I use technology and engaging lessons, but I inject my self into every lesson. All this being said, first and foremost, they learn that I care about them. I build relationships with every student. It isn’t easy with some, but they all know I care about them. I get involved in their lives as much as I can. It isn’t easy, but it works. No great secrets or techniques or best practices or whatever new fangled mumbo jumbo the knowitalls can come up with. I make them work and I hold them accountable. I tell them my expectations are high and I won’t except less. They call me old-school, but it works. My school has the largest Hispanic population in the county, but for the most part they all work hard.

dbow

May 22nd, 2009
5:02 pm

In my earlier response I neglected to mention two very key points to my success this year: I had the honor to work with a teacher that had even more experience than I did. She brought a wealth of knowledge and willingness to share her ideas with me. I also had a co-teacher in my literacy class that made teaching a remedial class fun and not so lonely. I laughed to my self this morning when I thought about how I’m still evolving as a teacher even with as many years I have. The one thing I still see as important though is that the more things change, the more they stay the same. All these new ideas that come down are just yesterdays proven teaching teaching methods. Good luck to everyone next year and have a safe and fun summer!!

ScienceTeacher671

May 23rd, 2009
7:52 pm

The local paper says the CRCT results are very good this year, and they attribute this to “Learning Focused” strategies.

I’m betting the results are better statewide, though.

DB

May 24th, 2009
8:17 pm

AG, hehe, no, I didn’t go to a private school. I didn’t need to where I grew up out-of-state, because the school system where I attended school is consistently ranked in the top 10 of school systems nationwide. One of my parents taught there, too, and my folks made a very deliberate choice off residence when they decided to raise a family. In fact, there was only two private schools in our area — one of them was considered “for problem kids”, and the other was the Catholic school.

Alas, I took six years of French, not German . . . mea culpa, dang it!

Dr. Craig Spinks /Evans

May 26th, 2009
1:38 am

When will the GOSA issue to The People the 2009 CRCT scores disaggregated by subtest, school, and school system?

Dr. Craig Spinks /Evans

May 26th, 2009
1:41 am

We need more teachers like “dbow.”

JustJoy7

May 26th, 2009
1:46 am

Many schools have mastered the art of “cheating” on the test to make their school shine. You can’t necessarily rely on the scores that you see. Educating has been dumbed down to teaching CRCT material for success in the spring. No good as that is not educating our children; instead, it’s keeping our jobs. Sad fallacy.

dbow

May 26th, 2009
4:12 pm

There are many teachers that believe as I do; that hard work and letting students take ownership of their education is the best route. What undermines all teachers is the misguided attitude that we are responsible for their self esteem and that holding them accountable for their actions is a bad thing. This new age garbage that gets stuffed down our throats every year and taught to new teachers is the culprit. Education has become a conveyor belt of non-production. They pass certain check points, get stuff shoved into their little heads and then they’re moved to the next check point. Along the way there’s some quality control(standardized testing), but if the kids don’t make muster, they’re still moved along that conveyor belt to the next check point. It’s all about quantity not quality any more.
Teachers that think like me are looked down upon because we hold onto the notion that the quality of the education students receive is more important than the amount of stuff we can fit in before the test.
I get frustrated and ticked off every year and swear that I’m going to quit, but I come back because when my kids do well I can tell all those young teachers and no-nothing administrators how it should be done.
There comes a point when we all realize that our parents were right about a lot of stuff. Hard work and perceverance paying off just to name two.

GreenJacket

May 27th, 2009
7:29 pm

Over here in Augusta there was a teacher who wore a dress to fulfill a bet with his students. He bet all of the 5th graders at his school that if they passed the social studies portion of the CRCT he would wear a dress. They did and he did. We need more teachers like that!!!

Cooriander

June 2nd, 2009
2:36 pm

June 2 – Gwinnett – and still waiting for the CRCT scores – any one else?

mom-2-2

June 3rd, 2009
10:23 am

nothing in Fulton. Why are they holding on to these scores? Are they hiding something?

JC

June 3rd, 2009
12:39 pm

Testing has NOT destroyed education…the education has been destroyed by:

- Goverment interference
- Sports, sports, sports, sports… The most popular reason for wasting time. The chance of becoming a professional athlete is 1/250,000 for males; and 1/870,000 for female athletes.
- Country’s academic isolation: “We are the best!!! However, In 2008 US ranked 25 in Math and 24 in Sciences among 30 more developed countries.

Mi two children always have exceeded in all content areas of CRCT, IOWA Test, etc (including several perfect scores). They participate in Gifted programs. The key to success in any field is the perseverance. Remember, that hard work always pays….

If you want your child to grow up to be a champion athlete (very, very, very low chance) it is OK, but don’t blame academic tests.

concerned

June 5th, 2009
7:20 pm

I am a current teacher- 6th grade math. I noticed that only one post even mentions what is required of a student to “pass” this test. A student had to answer 48% of the questions correct on the 6th grade math test to have passed in the eyes of the state. If your child came home with that grade on a test, would you celebrate??? I doubt it! Before you congratulate a teacher or a student because they “passed” be sure you understand what their true score is. Like I said, an 800 on 6th grade math is equivalent to a 48%. I had a 90% pass rate for the students that I teach. That sounds great at first but what if I had said, 90% of my students scored above a 48% on the test. Doesn’t sound too great anymore? Be aware of what your child truly made!

Manny

June 5th, 2009
7:38 pm

JC, some parents have their kids to play sports not to get them to become some professional athlete. Some kids like sports and it helps them excel in school and life.

Both of my kids are honor-roll students. Both are into sports. One is the class president. One scored the highest in his class in the CRCT.

But here’s the kicker: both are very well-adjusted and have great self-esteem. Both knows that they can excel in school, sports, or whatever they decide to do. And it is because they do a variety of things and experience a variety of events: school, sports, arts, church, vacations, etc.

But don’t patronize parents because of low test scores like they are based on sports. Sports have actually helped my kids’ test scores and scholastic achievement.