Educator furloughs

Presidents of the Georgia’s public colleges received permission Tuesday to furlough all employees – including faculty – for up to 10 days to cut costs.

University System of Georgia Chancellor Erroll B. Davis previously said he was “philosophically opposed” to furloughs but backtracked after angry responses from some state legislators.

Davis explained he didn’t want to furlough non-faculty staff when contracts protected faculty from being placed on unpaid leave.

The state university system was one of the few public state agencies that did not furlough employees this fiscal year.

Several school districts have furloughed employees and plan to do it again next year. Some school board members limited this to non-classroom teachers, while others extended it to everyone.

Furloughs are a way to save money, especially as budget shortfalls continue. But some prefer permanent cuts over temporary savings.

Do you think schools and college should furlough teachers? How can this be accomplished without hurting students?

50 comments Add your comment

Reality

May 13th, 2009
8:29 am

“How can this be accomploished without hurting students?” It can’t. Any cost cutting measure that impacts the classroom will hurt students. It is as simple as that.

If K-12 teachers are “furloughed” and are not given a pre-planning period of days to prepare for the students, then most (if not all) of the teachers will begin the semester unprepared and the students will not be using their time efficiently. Honestly, I cannot blame the teachers that do this. Who works for free?

It is a shame that GA continues to cut cost in classrooms when there is so very much “fat” or “pork” in the administration of education. How many does the State DOE employ? What are their salaries? How many in every school system sit in the “central offices”? What are their salaries? How many administrators are within each school? Are they really needed? What are their salaries?

All of this administration is the biggest waste, not within the classrooms. However, it is the administration that makes the cost cutting decisions and no way will they cut themselves…… ’tis better to hurt the students.

Fred

May 13th, 2009
9:00 am

The one and only solution that I can think of (in the time that it took to read the article, no other major brain power was involved) is to schedule the furlough days around the mandatory testing days and have the school administration, central office included serve as proctors. Teachers typically do not do much teaching on those days anyway. there’s my 5 minute solution.

VOICE

May 13th, 2009
9:02 am

Reality, so cold, so cold, but so true. And, what about operational costs? Why not focus first on how we do business, instead of personnel costs. Why are so many administrators and teachers out of their buildings during normal school hours, attending meetings, conferences, and workshops. Cut the costs of paying subs, travel, registration fees, etc. Clearly, with delayed/non-discipline and so many subs in the classrooms, the students are being hurt.

Many states have gone to a 4 Day School Week and a Year-Round calendar. It is actually saving millions in transportation, meals, utilities and more. Surprisingly, studies have not shown a decrease in academic achievement in these states.

We need new educational leadership in Georgia. The current so-called leadership is not moving us ahead. There are too many other areas to cut costs. Furloughs should be a last resort option.

Clarence

May 13th, 2009
9:06 am

Our schools spend about 11% on administration. There is undoubtably some waste there, but even if you cut that in half, it isn’t like this is going to solve problems of declining property values and reductions in state funding.

VOICE

May 13th, 2009
9:10 am

Clarence, Put a dollar amount on that @5.5% administration costs and you begin to get the real picture. Money saved is money saved.

Clarence

May 13th, 2009
9:10 am

Voice- can you link to some of your info on four-day weeks? I’m very interested in the subject, but I’m not aware of a single state that has gone to a four-day week. There are some districts that have, but the information I’ve been able to find on cost-savings has been more mixed. As for year-round school, the roadblock there is parents, not educators. Somehow summer vacation has become an entitlement

VOICE

May 13th, 2009
9:17 am

Clarence, Try http://www.sreb.org/scripts/Focus/Reports/08S06_Focus_sch_calendar.pdf and
Districts Debate Four-Day School Week
http://abcnews.go.com/WN/story?id=7334014&page=1

This was very insightful for me. Let me know what you think.

N.Ga. Teacher

May 13th, 2009
9:57 am

Furloughs are a great alternative to firing people. Most people can tighten the belts for two week’s less pay just fine, but losing a job is often catastrophic for an entire family. In some cases, furloughing provides the break some people need to return more rested and more productive. What I suggest is that colleges and high schools offer a “voluntary furlough” option to employees (with teachers being able to furlough their non-teaching days). I think many people would be surprised at the number of people who would gladly give up a few paid days to take a break now and then. This would also allow those individuals who really are in desperate financial situations to have fewer furloughed days. I am amazed this has not already been offered, because millions of dollars can be cut this way, and everyone will be happy.

Reality

May 13th, 2009
9:58 am

Clarence – What and where exactly is this 11% that you mention? Are you saying this is the average per individual school in GA? Are you saying it is the average per school system in GA? Are you saying that this includes the State DOE employees?

Let’s do the math (estimates) for my school. I will use estimated average salaries without any cost for benefits. Yes, these are ESTIMATES. Please don’t nit-pick about exact numbers. We have 1 principal ($150,000) plus 4.5 assistant principals ($100,000 x 4.5 = $450,000) plus 10 secretaries, etc. ($25,000 x 10 = $250,000) plus 8 counselors ($60,000 x 8 = $480,000) plus 1.5 nurse/nurse aid ($40,000 x 2 = $80,000) plus 8 custodians ($25,000 x 8 = $250,000). So, the total for non-classroom salaries comes to $1,660,000.

Now, for in-classroom salaries. We have 70 teachers ($40,000 x 70 = $2,800,000) plus 10 teacher-aides ($20,000 x 10 = $200,000) plus 2 media center people ($40,000 x 2 = $80,000). So the total for in-classroom student direct salaries comes to $3,080,000.

Let’s now compare the non-classroom salary total of $1,660,000 to the in-classroom salary total of $3,080,000. According to my math, the percentage of non-classroom cost is 35%. That is far off from your number of 11%!!!!!

I am not saying the non-classroom stuff is unimportant. I AM saying that cuts need to be made there first before in-classroom cuts for the sake of students and education.

DB

May 13th, 2009
10:00 am

So . . . exactly how can they furlough a teacher if the teacher’s contract specifies no furloughs?

There was a hospital a year or so ago facing a shortfall (don’t remember where), and the administration came to the employees and said, “Here’s what we’re facing — either firing some staff or everyone giving up a day a month.” The employees voted overwhelmingly to give up a day a month, to make sure that none of them ended up unemployed. However I’m pretty sure that no one at a local elementary school is going to give up a day of salary in order to keep an administrator at the central office.

Isn’t this something that can be managed by attrition? When someone quits, don’t hire a replacement?

jim d

May 13th, 2009
10:40 am

Clarence,

the parental road block could be cleared for YRS by showing the savings and making parents anti up if they wish to maintain a regular calendar.

Areas such as Gwinnett could place a moratorium on new school construction by going to a multi track schedule and using the buildings year round which would save hundreds of millions of dollars a year.

this is not rocket science!! just common sense

Ernest

May 13th, 2009
10:51 am

We keep going around and around on this topic. Wages and benefits make up roughly 90% of the general budget for most school districts. The only way to make a significant impact to a budget is to do ’something’ with that percentage. One could reduce staff, freeze wages, and/or reduce matching benefit costs. Simply reducing staff sizes in the central office will not be enough to make up the budget shortfalls. All of these can impact the service that citizens receive.

We could talk about increasing taxes but that is never a popular remedy. At the end of the day, we will get what we are willing to pay for…..

Teachers, too

May 13th, 2009
10:52 am

Reality,

Don’t you have to also include the cost of transportation, facility maintenance, etc.? I dont’ think Clarence was simply comparing the personnel cost. The administration cost is already at 33% and the number will go down further if you add those other expenses. 11% may not be exact, but it is definitely believable.

Teacher, Too

May 13th, 2009
10:53 am

Cobb County is moving to standards-based grading. How much is that costing in new software, and with the furlough day and preplanning already filled with required meetings, when are teachers supposed to learn how to use this system? Again, more and more put on teachers with now a decrease in salary. I am very happy to have a job in these economic times, but how on earth does this make sense?

If you have any experience with standards-based grading, would you chime in? We are getting this in middle school next year. I am wondering how this prepares students for college, and how the high schools in Cobb County are determining the valedictorian (are the grades numeric? in elem schools, the students are assessed a point of 1-4 or 5).

A final point on standards-based grading- late work. People get penalized all the time for being late (getting docked on pay, paying extra monetary penalties for late taxes, etc..). With standards-based grading, it is my understanding that teachers will no longer be able to point penalize students for turning work in late. How will students learn to appreciate a deadline if teachers have to accept work whenever students decide to turn in an assignment? What if the assignment is five weeks late?

Sorry– this is becoming a great concern right now with very little information being given to teachers about how this program is going to work. All the response from the parents seems rather negative.

reality 3

May 13th, 2009
11:08 am

It would be really cool if Laura did a blog about standards-based grading and the concept of late work. Should be very interesting, considering the latest results of the AJC’s article on remedial classes. Like college professors are going to take assignments late . . . but because the student hit the standard, they will get the grade? Laura?

VOICE

May 13th, 2009
11:30 am

Ernest, I get your point, but we are WASTING MILLIONS in other budget areas. We can talk percentages, but the real issue here involves dollars!

Jim d, once again I agree. This ain’t rocket science, it really is common sense. Jim, I would like to change my position on this because we’ve been in agreement too much lately, but I can’t. Maybe next time. :)

Erin

May 13th, 2009
11:41 am

I wonder how much money districts would save cutting out all the ridiculous stuff required by NCLB, the never-ending standardized testing and the cure de jour programs that will never work?

Just asking …

Ernest

May 13th, 2009
11:57 am

Take a look at this article that appeared in Tuesday’s Washington Post regarding states laying off employees, including teachers. I would think that given the choice between a furlough and a job, most would choose the furlough….

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/05/11/AR2009051103062_pf.html

Also in some cases, it makes sense to make capital investments in software and training IF one can provide an ROI by showing possible future staff reductions…

William Casey

May 13th, 2009
12:23 pm

Something I seldom see mentioned when cost-cutting is involved is TEXTBOOKS. Are you aware how expensive texts are ($50-80 per)? Must they be “hardback?” Do we even need texts for all classes? You can bet that some politicians’ relatives are making big money off this scam.

catlady

May 13th, 2009
12:48 pm

re the standards-based idea: work meets standards if it is correct (shows mastery) AT THE TIME IT IS EXPECTED. Otherwise it can meet the standard late, which results in a reduced grade.

catlady

May 13th, 2009
12:49 pm

William Casey: You want to see money? Look at NCLB and Reading First (FOB–friends of Bush)

jim d

May 13th, 2009
12:54 pm

I really hate to bring this up (no i don’t) but A permanent furlough for SOME TEACHERS might actually improve education.

Tony

May 13th, 2009
1:07 pm

jim d – I am permanently “furloughing” one teacher this year!

To the person who estimate salaries and percentages of school budgets, you have grossly understated the classroom teachers’ salaries. Try $60,000 plus benefits. If you have an older faculty, the total will be even higher. If you’re in a high school, coaching supplements will add even more. If this is a Georgia school, you can look up salaries from last year by going to the office of audits (google it).

Salary reductions would be a better way to go than furloughs. Salary reductions are permanent. Furloughs are not. There is an implied promise that someday the lost days of furloughs will come back. Go ahead and cut salaries across the board. This way, every is hit proportionately. Raises can be placed on the table if and when the economy improves.

jim d

May 13th, 2009
1:23 pm

Thanks Tony,

i was going to point that out but everytime i make a statement that there are teachers knocking down 60-80 thousand a year I get slammed pretty hard by folks too lazy to do the research.

high school teacher

May 13th, 2009
1:26 pm

Teacher, Too and Reality 3, I have my own verison of standards based grading. I use my standards as the gradebookcategories – no more daily work, tests, etc. categories. To address late work or missing work, I also have a work cateory in the gradebook. Every assignment gets a grade in the work category in addition to the standard category. Late or missing penalties are addressed in the work category. That way, if a student never turns in an assignment, he receives a zero in the work category but no grade in the standard category. If he decides to turn in an essay two weeks late, he can. The zero stays in the work category, but the essay will be marked according to its quality, not its lack of punctuality, and its high grade in the standard category will offset the zero in the work category.

Someone told me last year that I should market my idea, but I see that Cobb County beat me to it. Darn!

jim d

May 13th, 2009
1:31 pm

Changing the school calendar is the most effective method of realizing the largest savings without effecting teachers salaries. Why is that so hard for officials to understand??

Seriously folks, why the hell should teachers have to take the hit on this one? More importantly–why the hell would they be willing to?

Danteach

May 13th, 2009
1:57 pm

Why can’t school start after Labor Day? The amusement parks that employ students always complain, and it will give parents more time with their children.

dbow

May 13th, 2009
2:06 pm

Talking about standards based report cards, my district is also moving in that direction. We’re using a 0% for formative assignments and 100% for summative assignments format. We are told there will be no late work. Why you ask? Because students will be allowed to hand in work WHENEVER they want without penalty. When I asked why would we use such a ridiculous grading system, I was told it matches the real world. I asked what world that was, but the administrators where not amused. I asked if I could hand in reports and such late without penalty. Again, they found no humor in my poking holes in their glorious plan. The administrators here like to use the words “Body of evidence” when discussing a students grades, but when I bring up that formative assignments are an essential element of their body of evidence, I’m ignored and told that my ideals don’t match the reality of today’s students. If this isn’t excuse making for the lack of real leadership and holding students accountable I don’t know what is.

VOICE

May 13th, 2009
2:23 pm

Jim d, DRIVE THE POINT HOME! It is not so hard to understand that changing the school calendar is the most effective method of realizing savings. Officials simply DO NOT WANT TO UNDERSTAND because it would take political backbone to confront the parent/daycare issue. That is the only major obstacle. Teachers and support staff should not have to take the hit.

Ernest

May 13th, 2009
2:25 pm

OK JimD, I’ve got to ask. How will changing the school calendar provide savings to school districts?

Tony, can salaries be reduced? I thought furloughs would be easier and provide greater flexibility. Every employee has a ‘daily rate’ and you are just paying them for one or more fewer days.

jim d

May 13th, 2009
2:34 pm

ernest,

Year-round education is also known by the number of “tracks” it uses. A school using a “single track” year-round calendar is simply changing the instructional/vacation sequence of the school year; all the students and staff are in school or vacation at the same time. But a school using a “multitrack” year-round calendar does something quite different; it divides the entire student body and staff into different tracks (from three to five). If, for example, a school is using a four-track system, then at any one time three of the four tracks are attending school while the fourth is on vacation. The rotation sequence depends on the year-round calendar being used. In the 60/20 calendar, one track returns from vacation and one track leaves every 20 days.

The advantage of a multitrack system is that it expands the seating capacity of a school facility. For example, a school with a seating capacity of 1,000 could potentially enroll 1,500 if it uses a three-track system (each track having 500 students and one track always on vacation). The school’s seating capacity has been increased by 50 percent. In practice, however, three-track plans typically expand the seating capacity by about 33 percent. If a school with a seating capacity of 1,000 uses a four-track system, it could potentially enroll 1,333 students, increasing its capacity by 33 percent. In practice, four-track plans typically expand the seating capacity by about 25 percent.

This would require less new schools–less books—etc.

Harper's Mama

May 13th, 2009
2:49 pm

Standards based education grading scares the crap out of me. A child can turn in all of his papers the last day of the semester, yet we, as teachers, are expected to have grades reported before we leave for the semester. I don’t know how that is going to work. I can’t effectively grade 800 essays in 24 hours. It can’t be done.

Principal Teacher

May 13th, 2009
2:54 pm

Tony – I see your point but you have to realize that any reduction in salary hits twice. Once now and then again in retirement benefits later on. Not the best way in the long run as it is one that ‘keeps on taking’.

32 Years In

May 13th, 2009
3:09 pm

“and it will give parents more time with their children”
Do they really want that?? ; )

Cere

May 13th, 2009
3:19 pm

Reality, some of the bloggers at DeKalbSchoolWatch.blogspot did some research on the bloat at DCSS – as compared to other (similar) metro districts. You are quite right about the bloat at the top -
Read it here if interested
http://dekalbschoolwatch.blogspot.com/2009/02/dekalb-county-schools-system-as-mr_11.html

ps – Believe it or not, furloughs may be be bad for morale. It may actually be better to eliminate some positions, and let everyone else move on. The Wall St Journal reported on this -
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB123938638933208987.html

lyncoln

May 13th, 2009
3:29 pm

I’m also interested in the ’standards based grading’ vs. on-time submission of work problem.

Since ‘mastery’ is shown based on a specific set of standards, why not make up tests/essays where questions 1-5 deal with standard A, questions 6-10 are standard B, etc.? Give the test, and show what the student has passed and what they haven’t.

Homework becomes non-graded/optional/study help type of work. You highly recommend doing the homework before the test, because it allows the student to practice things that will be on the test. But the test and only the test proves if they know enough to pass the standard.

The problem is that this really won’t work for skills like writing essays, doing experiments in lab, art projects. Things like math tests, science tests, history fact tests, etc. work well with the idea.

A hypothetical: you divide the standards into 6 groups (or any number) with the groups to be mastered in order (to work on the 2nd group the student must show mastery of the 1st group). Obviously, this creates the problem of a classroom teacher having students working on different standards at different times. Or could you shuffle students among multiple classrooms as they progress through the standards? All students in a grade start on the same segment together, students that reach mastery quickly move to a separate classroom to work on the next group together and the other students keep working. Eventually different classrooms are working on different sets of standards, but are basically equal throughout the classroom.

jim d

May 13th, 2009
3:30 pm

32,

not really it just gives them more frequent time. Students still do 180 days a year

Ernest

May 13th, 2009
4:39 pm

JimD, for schools in the metro area that are growing (i.e. Gwinnett) this might work but outside the metro areas in the state, we have a lot of districts with 3 or fewer HS clusters. That along with a fairly stable student population, I’m not sure if that would result in significant savings.

I will pick up on your point about text books. I spoke to a colleague that lives in Northern New Jersey. He indicated their school district provided laptops for the HS students and no longer uses textbooks. You have a one time capital investment for the laptops. When you consider the pricing with the education discount and bulk purchasing, one could realize a ROI by year two. In fairness I did not ask about the pricing for electronic books but I would bet it would be significantly cheaper than textbooks we are familiar with. It would be interesting to perform some type of cost benefit analysis on this to determine if it would work for large school districts.

ScienceTeacher671

May 13th, 2009
5:34 pm

Our school has been buying a classroom set of textbooks, and an electronic book for each student, which is much cheaper.

The problem is that the students who really *need* the book at home frequently don’t have a computer in their home, or perhaps have a computer without a working CD drive. It might work well in more affluent districts.

My niece’s school was one of the first to do the laptop program, but they discontinued it after several years because of problems including excessive maintenance problems/costs. There were also problems with students abusing IM, playing games instead of doing classwork, etc., IIRC.

ScienceTeacher671

May 13th, 2009
6:47 pm

VOICE, I’m a bit skeptical about the benefits of the four-day school week. The SREB report you linked says “There is a decided lack of evidence that the four-day week helps or hurts student achievement —
anecdotal information seems to point merely to a “lack of harm” where student achievement is concerned.” They also indicate that the cost savings might not be as great as some claim.

The anecdotal claims of benefit sound a lot like the bill of goods we were sold for block scheduling — but most of the research on block scheduling shows that standardized test scores generally are significantly lower, at least on the 4×4 block.

Lee

May 13th, 2009
8:31 pm

Holy cow. Where’s Mr. Liberty when you need him?

“As for year-round school, the roadblock there is parents, not educators. Somehow summer vacation has become an entitlement.”

An entitlement??!! Good Lord, there is so much wrong with that statement it is beyond belief.

Summer yet??

May 13th, 2009
8:53 pm

Missing in all of this discussion is V for Vendetta. V, where are you?! Would privatizing schools solve this dilemma??

Before everyone gets too puffed up about bloated salaries of administrators, keep in mind that administrators make “the big bucks” because they work a longer contract than teachers. Where teachers have a 190 day contract, administrators may have anywhere from a 210-240 day contract. Pay is based on a daily rate…you do the math. There definitely are bad administrators who are in their positions for the pay, they don’t like dealing with students in closed quarters all day, they love holding the hammer over teachers’ heads, and they like off-campus meetings because they can run a few errands in the process. However, sit through enough away games and extracurricular activities (HS), listen to enough parents insist their cherubs never do anything but walk on water, and try to meet the unwieldy expectations of central office folks and you’ll appreciate the time spent by administrators doing their jobs and the accompanying pay (well beyond the 40 hours, 240 day contract). Administrators rarely if ever get extra stipends for anything…it’s all part of the job. Been there, done that, went back to the classroom. Teachers spend a ton of extra time too planning how to take care of the gems who grace their rooms every day.

Before ANYONE can really understand the combat pay educators get, please walk a mile or a day (more than a mile, trust me) in their shoes. Furloughs are just coverups for a governor who is long overdue a furlough himself…and take Supt. Cox with you!

lm4k

May 14th, 2009
1:04 am

Citizens, we are at RED ALERT level!!
You are no better than Nero–ROME IS BURNING!
This is not just a little dip in the market, OUR DOLLAR IS HEADED FOR COLLAPSE SOON!
Geitner and the banksters HAVE ROBBED US BLIND! The New World Order is being set up as we speak.
Please, listen to what this former bank regulator has to say:

http://finance.yahoo.com/tech-ticker/article/244222/%22The-Greatest-Boondoggle-in-History%22-Banks-Buoyed-at-Taxpayers‘-Expense?tickers=WFC,MS,BAC,C,XLF,%5EDJI,%5EGSPC

MEDICARE AND SOCIAL SECURITY ARE BROKE!!!!!!
http://finance.yahoo.com/tech-ticker/article/246953/Social-Security-and-Medicare-Crisis-Expect-Health-Care-Rationing-and-Later-Retirement;_ylt=Ali6ljWwiCq83b1MX6obte5l7ot4?tickers=%5EDJI,%5EGSPC,SPY,DIA,TLT,UUP

Spend your money now while it is still worth something. Stock up on food—maybe a year’s supply. Buy necessities now. If you can, buy land in Asia. If you can, move to Asia. Teach your children Mandarin Chinese. Buy seeds and learn how to grow your own food. Get out of treasuries. Stock up on medicine and any medication you take regularly. VERY SOON, TAX RATES WILL SKYROCKET AND AT THE SAME TIME WE WILL SEE HYPER-INFLATION. The job market will continue to crumble. Obama/Geitner/Fed spending spree HAS ALREADY PUT US OVER THE EDGE! PULL YOUR KIDS OUT AND HOME SCHOOL THEM! Save taxpayers over $10,000 per kid. You can give them a superior education, five days a week FOR UNDER $1,000! Plus, your kids will have much less exposure to the Mexican Flu and classroom violence! You can feed them real food! AMERICANS, PATRIOTS, WAKEUP!

VOICE

May 14th, 2009
8:58 am

ST671, It’s all in how you manage it. Of course, some districts do a far better job than others.

Clearly, the savings by eliminating “5th day costs” cannot be disputed. Transportation, meals, utilities, and certain salaries are all required for the 5th day. For instance, when you consider the fact that teacher and student attendance is improved with a 4 Day School Week, costs associated with paying for subs are also reduced. This is especially true if districts limit training conferences, meetings, workshops, and seminars to times other than normal school hours. Over a given period of time, when combined with a Year-Round calendar for example, there is a cumulative effect on savings that is compounded and permanent.

The main point here, however, is not just that districts can save money with such a system, but that they should START with operational cuts, not teacher furloughs.

high school teacher

May 14th, 2009
12:49 pm

Voice, imagine if… we went to a 4 day week, and ALL training or collab planning days took place on the fifth day when necessary? Though we might not save as much on operational costs (we would still power the buildings), imagine the savings in bus and cafeteria areas.

Clarence

May 14th, 2009
1:55 pm

I’m probably much too late to the party at this point, but thought I’d respond anyway. Voice- thanks for the info on the four-day week – I’m going to look that over now. jim d- my percentages come directly from the statewide expenditure reports available on the DOE website. They neatly break everything out by various categories. I simply added the “system admin” and “school admin” categories. These reports include all expenditures (state/local/federal). The most recent reports are 2008, but those don’t change radically from year to year. Also, I took the statewide number – they break it up by system too if you are interested.

VOICE

May 14th, 2009
3:11 pm

HS Teacher, you hit the point right on the head. And, the so-called leadership knows this, but refuse to take on the parent/daycare issue.

Clarence, let me know what you think about the 4 Day Week info.

jim d

May 15th, 2009
8:20 am

ok so a 4 day week would save how exactly?

Would the school year remain 180 days?

Meme

May 15th, 2009
2:22 pm

I like the idea of furloughs during CRCT and ITBS testing. I will be glad to stay at home and take a pay cut during these.

ScienceTeacher671

May 16th, 2009
8:40 am

VOICE, I agree that systems should start with operational cuts, instead of furloughs, and I agree that cutting the 5th day would have to cut costs.

I’m just worried about those 4 longer days….