Teaching children with autism

Two events focusing on children with autism are being held in Atlanta.

Autism is a severe developmental disability that affects brain functions in several areas, such as communication skills. It is a spectrum disorder meaning the severity of the disease varies widely among children.

For years, parents and school officials have clashed over the best way to teach these children. Many are bright but have difficulty interacting with other students. As a result, some schools separate autistic students from classmates. Their parents and other advocates say this deprives autistic children of a quality education.

Some say these parents are just fighting for their kids. Others say they are putting unreasonable demands on schools.

While many might not like to admit it publicly, a lot of parents don’t want autistic students in the same classroom as their kids. They say teachers spend so much time with the special needs students that it takes away from the rest of the class.

Who is doing a good job teaching kids with autism? What more should schools do?

64 comments Add your comment

jim d

April 17th, 2009
9:51 am

“Their parents and other advocates say this deprives autistic children of a quality education.”

I’m afraid their rights end where they begin to infringe upon the rights of others to obtain an education.

PJ

April 17th, 2009
10:13 am

Enter your comments here

zoe

April 17th, 2009
11:08 am

http://www.buffalonews.com/home/story/632188.html

Jim D, you may enjoy this article. Speaks to the heart of your post.

V for Vendetta

April 17th, 2009
11:08 am

There are few demands more consistently irrational than those promoted by these types of advocates. As Jim D stated, they often desire special attention and accommodations AT THE EXPENSE of other students. It is a clear violation of those other students’ rights. Let’s assume for a (blissful) minute that people didn’t consider education a right–that, like eating, it was a volitional act. In that case, we must exist using the only two rights we inherently have: the right to live and the right to do what is necessary to continue to live.

If we accept those two beliefs, and we accept that education is a choice, then favoring the needs of one student at the EXPENSE of others–who desire their educations because they’re there by choice–is completely immoral. In reality, education is considered a “right” by many. But even then there are parents who instill a sense of accountability in their children. Those children WANT to do well, but the needs of this other child supercede their educations and comes at the EXPENSE of their educations.

If you don’t think this happens ALL OF THE TIME, you’re dead wrong. It happens everywhere. (These are NATIONAL laws, after all.) It’s just another reason why privitization and choice will clean up this failing system. A school will determine if it wants to accept these students. A school will decide how these students will be educated. If the parents don’t like it, they are more than willing to homeschool their children. Having a disability is not a debt to be paid by the rest of society. It’s not a claim to special rights and accommodations at the expense of others. There is a big difference between accommodating people out of respect and giving in to their unreasonable demands based solely on perceived “need.”

jim d

April 17th, 2009
11:16 am

Zoe,

Indeed it is a balancing act to not infringe on either parties rights to an appropriate education. I know of no simple answer. No complex answer either.

Concerned Parent

April 17th, 2009
11:26 am

When I went to school all the retarded children were rightfully segregated and sent to a “special” school that met their needs. Mainstreaming is a failure but it is the politically correct, and legal thing, to do. All these retarded and special kids do is to cause disruptions and keep the normal children from learning. I know this sounds harsh but it is the unvarnished truth.

Kim

April 17th, 2009
11:27 am

As a former SPED teacher I can see both sides of this dilemma. As jim d said, there is no easy answer. I have worked with autistic students in and out of the regular classroom, and I am convinced they need interaction with other students, but at the same time they do take away from the others. What helped at my school was to assign a full-time para-pro to the autistic child. In these hard economic times, this may not be an option anymore.

Concerned Parent

April 17th, 2009
11:37 am

Even with a para pro those “special” kids are still a distraction. They can’t keep up with the regular work so the classroom teacher dumbs down the content. The modifications for special kids is a joke also. Instead of preparing these retards for a realistic life after school all the powers that be are doing is catering to the lowest common denominator.

jim d

April 17th, 2009
11:39 am

Japan—–Something to consider.

Mainstreaming in Japan does not necessarily mean attending regular classes; it often means attending a regular school that has special classes for handicapped students. There are also special public schools for the handicapped, which have departments equivalent to the various levels of elementary and secondary schools, including kindergarten and upper-secondary departments in some cases.

Teacher, Too

April 17th, 2009
12:30 pm

If the child is high-functioning, then I certainly can see mainstreaming an autistic child. If the child is low- to middle functioning, then maybe he/she can be in the class for the instructional part of the period and then work with a sped teacher for modifications in the sped room.

What concerns me more are the children who are minimally functioning and will never be a productive member of society, yet we spend untold millions of dollars “educating” them. I am talking about severely mentally and physically handicapped children who cannot feed themselves, cannot use the bathroom (diapers), and cannot speak. Millions upon millions of dollars are used to send these children to school, have extremely small classes with parapros, physical therapists, speech therapists, and the list goes on…

(BTW, I’m not talking about children who have mental capability–such as Stephen Hawking, who is a brillian scholar. He has a way to communicate.)

Please don’t call it an education if they child will never become a functioning, literate adult. I am not opposed to giving severe special needs students (and their parents) help, but please fund it a different way and don’t call it “education.” I know this is harsh, and I’m sure I will get severely criticized, but honestly, it doesn’t seem much more than physical therapy, baby-sitting, and parental-relief (and I am not knocking that at all– special needs parents do need to work and do need a place to entrust their children).

I don’t know the answers, but we sure are spending a cruise-sized load of money (boat load doesn’t even begin to cover it!) on children who will likely never work and will always need care.

AP Teacher

April 17th, 2009
1:53 pm

I’m afraid that I have to agree with the masses here. The special education students are in regular ed. classes at the detriment of the “normal” students. We had a student in an Honors math course who had Asperger’s Syndrome, and every day, I silently would pray that he was absent from class. He would belabor a point ad nauseum; he would argue with me about things that he couldn’t accept; he would not follow directions; he would disrupt me in the middle of a lesson -it was a complete nightmare.

His parents met with all of his teachers and explained his “situation”, but, I found myself resenting the fact that I was spending more time on him that with anyone else – and it had nothing to do with the math. He understood it, for the most part. He chose not to believe some of the material, and therefore didn’t think he should have to be held responsible for it! And, since this student had a 504 plan and an IEP (of course), I was bound by law to make modifications for him and allow him to do basically whatever he wanted. That was so unfair to the other students, as well as to me. I am not a Special Education teacher, and I oftentimes felt ill-equipped to deal with this kid’s rants. I could’ve been a better teacher to the other 27 students in the room if he wasn’t in there.

Lisa B.

April 17th, 2009
2:20 pm

I fear that in the future, we will pay dearly for putting most of our education funds into the kids who can’t (or won’t) contribute to society. I am afraid that many of our best and brightest are the children being “left behind.” I really don’t want to go back to the days of segregating our special needs children, but neither do I want to sacrifice all the other students. It seems impossible to be equally fair to all the students.

ScienceTeacher671

April 17th, 2009
2:36 pm

There are also students who would learn much better in small classes, away from the distractions of a large class, and with more personal attention than they can get in a regular classroom, but these students are also being mainstreamed whether their parents want them to be or not.

catlady

April 17th, 2009
4:58 pm

I have been assigned to teach 4 autistic children for one period per day in a very low functioning mainstreamed classroom. I am NOT certified in sp ed. The children are educable to a degree (they are all fairly low average functioning–meaning they can decode simple words), but cause a great deal of disruption to their classmates. They will never be able to drive or live independently. Another mainstreamed student in the room screams nearly continuously. It is like the 5th circle of Hell. I have had a headache for months, which went away briefly after about the 10th day of Christmas break. I hope to feel better by July 1.

I watch my fellow teachers be bitten, spit on, and pinched. That is NOT for me.

Previously I taught (for 2 years, the maximum allowed without certification) 3 very low moderately mentally handicapped students aged 12-14. One was not toilet trained. None were able to take care of their menstrual needs. 2 did not speak at all. The other had about 40 words, most of them revolving around “you punk”. They will never be able to live independently, and have not been able to get into a work situation since they have “aged out” of school at age 23. They are not really trainable to work.

I have pretty strong feelings about the needs of the many outweighing the needs of the few.

I am very sympathetic to their parents, but there has to be a limit to how much we pay and how much disruption there is to the other students. The sp ed lobby will jump all over that, I am sure, but there has to be a cost-benefit analysis done at some point unless we are willing to devote ever-increasing amounts of money. (Of course, Georgia, with its adoption of RTI, is ignoring the needs of many sp ed kids by simply NOT IDENTIFYING THEM.If you don’t identify them, you don’t have to serve them, and the regular ed teacher has to find a way to “modify” for them.)

I hate the idea that all children should be in regular classes. Some can handle it without detriment to themselves, and many cannot. Many take too much time away from their more able peers. There HAS to be consideration given for the other 25! They should also get a free and APPROPRIATE public education.

Next week I get to give the CRCT to a high intellectually functioning autistic child. I will be closed up in a small room with him. His social skills are that of a two year old. While we will not be having a tea party, it is difficult to contain him and keep him focused. He is inappropriate. He also outweighs me by about 30 pounds, and I am no small woman.

You may not hear from me after Wednesday.

jim d

April 17th, 2009
5:01 pm

cat,

perhaps we need only revisit the definition of APPROPRIATE

catlady

April 17th, 2009
5:47 pm

“Appropriate” is key for sped and regular and gifted kids. And it is obviously NOT the same thing.

Each year I taught sp ed they paid for me and an aide. Our joint salaries and benefits came to over 130,000$ each year, for three kids. This year our special-est class has 2 students who generally come all day and 2 students who come most days and arrive about 11. They each have a full time parapro and a 6th year degreed teacher. They get speech therapy (they don’t speak), physical therapy, and occupational therapy. They are unable to walk alone, are in diapers, must be fed (one through a tube), and have daily seizures. One stops breathing frequently. (To be fair, they rarely participate in mainstreamed classroom activities.) Do you know what the cost is? Is this appropriate?

Then we have many classrooms who are held hostage daily by kids who have serious behavior, learning, or health problems. They usually do not have “support”–their IEPs are written so that they do not “need” assistance, and it all falls on the classroom teacher and their peers. Appropriate?

The TRUE POWER does not lie in the military, or the President. It rests in the sp ed lobby. Don’t cross them!

catlady

April 17th, 2009
5:52 pm

BTW, if we were really serious about catching OBL, we would broadcast that he dissed sp ed kids as unworthy of every kind of public-funded assistance (including monthly payments of over $500 per child) and the sp ed lobby would FIND him and KILL him in less than a month! And I say that with some degree of admiration.

catlady

April 17th, 2009
5:58 pm

Note another missing submission about 5:15 or so.

ScienceTeacher671

April 17th, 2009
6:05 pm

catlady, I’ve noticed that most of the missing submissions seem to show up the next day, about the time Laura starts posting – but they show up in their proper place, so they’re easy to miss if you restart the thread at the last post…

ScienceTeacher671

April 17th, 2009
6:25 pm

I keep waiting for the parent of a regular-ed student to file a lawsuit because their child has been injured, sexually harassed, etc. by an out-of-control spec. ed. student, or because the mainstreamed students disrupted the educational process too much.

I think some of the mainstreaming we’re seeing is simply because the districts can’t find enough “highly qualified” special education teachers.

Also, the state of Georgia is now expecting everyone to get a college-prep diploma…but I don’t think that my “intellectually disabled” students are going to meet those standards, no matter how hard they try.

ScienceTeacher671

April 17th, 2009
6:40 pm

Is anyone aware of any research showing RTI to be effective for any but early primary children?

loves to read

April 17th, 2009
7:50 pm

We have not even been properly trained to know what to do for RTI. Our superintendent (in SE Ga) told the principals that each school could come up with their own plan! Basically, we were told that we need to do as much as possible so that everyone can pass! We were promised lots of books, etc. with tons of research-based interventions. Well, guess what? We weren’t given squat. Most of us have looked on the internet for interventions. When the heck am I supposed to do this? With 96 kids, I’m supposed to spend all of my time for these few kids who don’t care. Why?? Why should I do that for middle school kids who come to school only for the social life? They sit in my class and do nothing, but somehow this is my fault? I can’t tell you how much I hate RTI. It’s a joke. Looks good on paper to write all of these great “plans” you have for intervention, but no plan will fix apathy. I can’t make kids study or do homework. It’s no better than SST as far as my school is concerned. It’s looking like a lot of us will cave in to this extra pressure we’re under and just start “giving” these kids a 70. It’s a lot easier, and all the admin wants is for everyone to pass! That way they will be off of our backs, and the kids will pass and continue on to the next grade. Then next year, the cycle begins with a new group of kids. Until we hold the kids and parents accountable, these kids will never pass on their own. It’s so unfair to the kids who always work hard. Makes me really sick and ashamed of my chosen profession. I’m retiring in 3 years if it doesn’t kill me first.

catlady

April 17th, 2009
8:52 pm

Science Teacher–Define: effective. If you mean “keeps kids who are sp ed from getting sp ed help”, RTI is very effective.

It is sort of funny because for 2 years we have been told we have “too many” kids in sped. And we discovered a few weeks ago that it LOOKS like we have a lot of kids in sp ed because of incorrect coding that has been done in powerschool!

In our county no one wants to go through RTI because the CO keeps putting more and more onerous obstacles in the way of getting help. Literally. Case in point: our school (600+ kids) has only been able to get 1 kid evaluated in the last 2 years, and it has only happened in the last couple of weeks!. How many have needed evaluation (are not successful no matter how they are helped)? 20 or more, mostly because our feeder school (early primary) will NOT EVER do any RTI documentation. So we get third graders not functioning on even 1st grade level, with no evidence that the RTI process has ever begun. 200 kids a year, and miraculously NOT A ONE has ever needed RTI, no matter how severe their problems. And no one at the CO level questions it. Of course, when we SSTd, there were only a handful that were met on for that. And no followup.

If by “effective” you mean that RTI miraculously “cures” or ameliorates the severe deficits, well, it ain’t happened yet for us. But it has only been 2 years. If a child has been the victim of poor instruction, RTI should help. But lo, and behold! THAT ISN’T THE PROBLEM!

RTI is just an attempt to save money, and to discredit experienced teachers’ efforts and evaluation of the child. NO TEACHER starts the RTI process on a kid unless they have tried everything. No one would lightly commit to all the gathering of documentation (to the point of idiocy) until every trick has been tried. I find it insulting.

V for Vendetta

April 17th, 2009
9:18 pm

Maybe someone should start a lobby for Gifted kids. :-)

involvedparent

April 18th, 2009
3:09 am

Wow. AMAZING! What a testimony to the utter FAILURE of government schools. Now, please tell me; just why do we have this forced atrocity called public school? Oh, isn’t the idea that everyone chips in and ALL children will be educated, regardless of personal financial resources? After all, this idea did not come from the Founding Fathers, but from Communist ideology. It is a form of educational wealth redistribution. That means that only a small percentage of the population actually pays the total cost for their child’s education. The rest are left to squabble over the rest of the “free lunch”. Hmmm. Perhaps the Autistic child’s parents are in that wealthy small percentage (Silicon Valley engineers) that is also paying for that regular-ed and gifted student? And what if those other students’ parents have been out of work for the past year? Should the dogs be biting the hand that feeds them? If the purpose of Communism is to show charity (each according to his ability; each according to his need), shouldn’t the weakest be given priority for help? The solution is simple; if you want special treatment for your regular child, then pay for it yourself. Vote to overturn the compulsory education law. OTHERWISE, QUIT WHINING!

Zoe

April 18th, 2009
9:31 am

I team taught in a collab class with a special ed teacher. His theory was that special ed was getting out of control and that until the parents of the “regular ed” students stood up and said enough was enough, we would keep throwing money away on special ed. It seems that many regular ed parents are seeing just how much we are wasting on special ed. The amount Catlady cited ($130k for 3 students!) is awful. Why does a student that will never speak or walk need a teacher with a 6 year degree. Why can’t the school system provide a $10/hour nurse’s aide? They would serve the same function. There is no way a teacher should be assisting a student with her menstrual needs! Public schools are constanted berated for how funds on spent, but I am sure millions are spent on special ed and we will never see a return on that money. On the other hand, our brightest and most advanced students get the shaft because “they’ll pass the test.” Then there is the lament about poor SAT scores. The SAT is designed for the children at the top, if you never challenge those kids, the SAT scores will never break the national average.

Until the 70s, many severe and profound students were institutionalized or didn’t exist because they would never have survived. Evil to say, I know, but many of these children will never live meaningful lives, be drains on society and parents send them to school because they aren’t able to care for them full time without being drained emotionally and physically.

Some parents of special ed students also get stipends from the government and other types of assistance. In terms of Special Ed, children that are classified a certain way get money from SSI. Some parents actually train their kids to get into Special Ed so the parent gets kid’s the SSI and doesn’t have to work.

Lee

April 18th, 2009
10:41 am

We had an experience with this when my youngest was in second grade. Bottom line, teacher had to spend about an hour per day dealing with all the issues with a sped kid. You do the math, what’s that, about 25 days of instruction time lost?

This is just one more example of the politically correct experimentation that goes on in today’s schools. Politicians and educrats just can’t bring themselves to admit that there are differences in ability and the best option would be to group by ability and provide the level of instruction appropriate for that ability group. You see, that goes against the everybody’s-equal-so-let’s-all-hold-hands-and-sing-kumbaya mantra they’ve been chanting since Brown vs Board.

And those same politicians and educrats can’t understand why parents are wanting choice (ie, anything but the public schools) such as charter schools, magnet schools, and vouchers.

catlady

April 18th, 2009
11:15 am

V–I notice gifted kids are not being served by “push in” nor are the gifted teachers the ones who are being discussed for layoff–just sp ed and ESOL. Maybe there IS a gifted kids lobby because in my county they are not the ones feeling the brunt of the lessening of services like the other kids are!

I notice my RTI post from last night still has not appeared.

V for Vendetta

April 18th, 2009
1:55 pm

catlady, isn’t that how it should be? Why would we cut services, funding, and resources from our best and brightest? Considering the amount of money spent per child in SPED, I would think that a little trimming could be done without affecting the “education” of those children. The same could not be said of Honors or Gifted students.

ScienceTeacher671

April 18th, 2009
2:51 pm

cat, I’m still missing a post or two as well.

loves to read

April 18th, 2009
6:05 pm

My RTI post from yesterday evening has not appeared either.

DB

April 18th, 2009
7:52 pm

School is to educate. Socialization is a fringe benefit. No way should the primary focus of education be pushed aside in order to provide “quality playgroup time” for autistic students who are incapable of getting anything out of the educational setting.

Yes, it is painful to have a child who will probably never be a contributing member of society. Yes, I’m sure they DO need a break and that school is a much-needed break for the parents. But . . . no.

Sarah H

April 18th, 2009
8:24 pm

It is amazing how many more rights special ed students have.

Sarah H

April 18th, 2009
8:25 pm

I have had several posts that have not appeared. This sucks.

ScienceTeacher671

April 18th, 2009
10:34 pm

Suppressing the posts certainly has a detrimental effect on the discussion.

Parent&Professional

April 19th, 2009
9:43 am

The real problem is a lack of resources as a whole, and we have our society to blame for that. I work with children with special needs and speak with parents regularly who DO NOT want their children in regular education classes. The problem is that they don’t have any other options. We are seriously lacking in services for children with special needs. Some agencies have extremely long waiting lists just to get services or preschool placement. So, many parents are willing to pay for a better educational option for their child, but they can’t get in the door. Yes, our system is failing many children, but we need to be careful about assuming all parents and special education advocates are pushing for mainstream placement when it is not appropriate.

Lee

April 19th, 2009
11:33 am

The blog monster has ate a couple of my posts as well. Maybe the third time’s the charm…

A few years ago, there was a sped child in my daughter’s second grade. The teacher had to spend at least one hour per day dealing with the various issues with this child. You do the math, what’s that, about 25 days of lost instruction time over the course of the year?

If my child were to be absent 25 days, the school would be threatening me with the truancy laws, but it’s okay to lose an equivalent amount of time dealing with a sped kid. Go figure.

About five years ago, one of my coworkers had a child with a speech problem. Did his parents demand the school make special concessions for their child? No. They got him enrolled in a program with LSU (or was it Tulane? I can’t remember), sold their house in Atlanta, moved to be near the university, and got new jobs.

And that’s the difference between self-sufficient folks and those who sit back and demand that the government take care of everything — even to the detriment of the rest of the class.

ScienceTeacher671

April 19th, 2009
12:32 pm

Parent & Prof – we have parents who don’t think their children need to be in the regular classroom also, but the SpEd people at the board office say that those children are *required by law* to be mainstreamed, and so they don’t offer SpEd classes in those subjects.

ScienceTeacher671

April 19th, 2009
5:25 pm

loves to read, catlady – the research I’ve read on RTI says that if students who are experiencing difficulty IN EARLY PRIMARY YEARS – say kindergarten through 2nd grade – are diagnosed and remediated on their specific problems, many will not need special education services later.

This is in contrast to the current system, in which students must begin failing or be so many years below grade level in order to be tested.

However, I have found nothing in the research to indicate that RTI might be effective AFTER early primary grades – which begs the question of why we are being told to implement it K-12. Is someone collecting data to see whether or not it works, and is this a grand experiment using the entire state of GA?

Or ARE they just trying to keep children from being diagnosed?

Parent and professional

April 19th, 2009
5:29 pm

I must say that I was amazed at some of the comments made about educating autistic children. I am a mental health therapist with 15 years of experience in mental health and I also have a minor in education. I am also the parent of an autistic child. My son is currently enrolled at a high school in Washington state and I must say that people here in Washington have a much more progressive and I stress progressive attitude than what I am hearing from some Georgian residents. I was doing research on the best schools in the Atlanta Georgia area and came across this website. One of the reasons we decided to relocate to Georgia was because we mistakenly assumed that such one sided thinking was a thing of the past. My son’s classmates love him being in his class and his teachers all say that he is a pleasure to teach. His GPA is currently a 3.50. He has written several musical compositions for his band and is very active in community volunteering and won the Key Club community service award. I would ask everyone who has an opinion about educating autistic children not make such generalizations about how difficult “they” are to teach as if autistic children are second class citizens. I would also encourage teachers working with these children to carefully consider the career choice you made before complaining about the extra challenges involved. My child’s psychiatrist told me when he was just 7 years old my son would thrive with good teachers and educational programs which has held true. He is now looking into colleges because his father and I would not accept anything less than the best education for him. Yet, you try to deprive autistic children of the same right to education as all other children. Keep in mind that it is all tax payers who in some way pay for schooling and not just for some but for all.

I am looking forward to becoming an advocate for autistic children when I arrive in Atlanta.

Thanks for opening my eyes!

DB

April 19th, 2009
8:43 pm

Parent & Professional — as I am sure you are well aware (but I will hammer for the masses), autism is a spectrum disorder. While it sounds as though your son is certainly performing on the high end of the spectrum, I think I can speak for most on this board that we are not referring to those students who are capable of active and meaningful participation in a learning environment. Our comments are directed at those students who are on the other end of the spectrum, the ones that suck up time and resources and without any appreciable improvement or hope of becoming a contributing member of society.

Welcome to Atlanta, but frankly, if you arrive in Atlanta with a chip that big on your shoulder, you are going to find it a hard slog. If we are so retrogressive and backward, why on earth would you want to move here?

lm4k

April 20th, 2009
2:32 am

Parent and Professional:
Thank you for your eloquent defense of autistic children. After 4 years in private school, we decided to home school our son who happens to have Aspberger’s syndrome. He absolutely thrives in this environment. He is gifted in math, science and computer programming/graphics. Our flexibility allows him to do advanced work in these subjects, and he gets to practice his social skills in a safe, predictable environment. He loves going to church and has made several friends there. My children also get to eat three healthy home-cooked meals each day. Proper nutrition does seem to have a positive impact on controlling “meltdowns”. My son is a delight and a great help with his siblings (he’s also a great cook!)
My favorite Bible verse:
“But the Lord said unto Samuel. Look not on his countenance, or on the height of his stature; because I have refused him; for the Lord seeth not as man seeth; for man looketh on the outward appearance, but the Lord looketh on the heart.”

jim d

April 20th, 2009
7:16 am

Parent and professional,

Welcome to Georgia. I would hope that in your advocacy for autisic children you would keep in mind the differences in function of children with needs a weigh that with the needs of gifted and other students needs. :) Keeping in mind the cost of depriving our brightest from excelling.

HAGD.

Lee

April 20th, 2009
9:13 am

P&P wants to advocate for her autistic child, but when we advocate for our “normal” children, we’re not “progressive.”

Being “progressive” is one of the root causes of the education mess we find ourselves in.

jim d

April 20th, 2009
9:44 am

Lee,

I have no problem with people advocating for kids with special needs as long as it is balanced with the needs of all. Which once again could be met with CHOICE schools.

BoogerMan

April 20th, 2009
2:40 pm

tat clahton.talk is very boring…..kimberly allen has a boring blog……………..

\yes...i ageee with youuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

April 20th, 2009
2:44 pm

i agfree with boggerman. w//o gman she aint got no one blogging on her boringnow blog. kimberly……this is not nycity.

Tony

April 20th, 2009
5:55 pm

How many of you have read Harrison Bergeron? Kurt Vonegut wrote this short story many years ago, but it seems that in our modern world we are moving in that very direction. Google it and you’ll find it.

jim d

April 21st, 2009
6:59 am

Tony,

saw the movie with Sean Astin and howie mandel.

governments role to make everyone equal? Yeah looks like we are well on our way.

V for Vendetta

April 21st, 2009
11:09 am

P and P, I agree with what some of the others said: When describing some of our frustrations, we were generally talking about low functioning autistic children or those who were completely unable to behave in a manner that was not distracting.

L4MK, I wonder what conflicts your child had that caused you to remove him? Was it a case of the school being unreasonable or was he unable to refrain from causing a classroom distraction? You were right to quote the Bible; it’s very compassionate.

Kind of like this:

“Samaria shall become desolate; for she hath rebelled against her God: they shall fall by the sword: their infants shall be dashed to pieces, and their women with child shall be ripped up.”
Hosea 13:16

I love me some compassion.