When does discipline cross the line?

Some parents from a south Fulton charter school withdrew their kids after accusing teachers of “excessive punishment.”
The parents say teachers at KIPP South Fulton Academy were wrong to separate their kids from other students during class and lunch. They said students were made to sit on the floor and one girl urinated on herself because she was not allowed to use the restroom immediately.
School leaders dispute parents’ version of the story. They said no students were mistreated and that the students were disciplined after disrupting class for several days.
Leaders from the middle school in East Point said they should have told parents their kids were in trouble, but refused to remove the teachers involved. The principal said the school should have done a better job explaining expectations for student conduct.
Without knowing all the details, it’s hard to tell if teachers or parents overreacted to the situation.
But it does raise some interesting questions. At what point should parents be told their children got in trouble and will be disciplined? When does that punishment become excessive?

71 comments Add your comment

DB

March 23rd, 2009
9:21 am

At what point should parents be told their children got in trouble and will be disciplined? Parents shouldn’t be surprised that their child will be disciplined if they step out of line. Having said that, as a parent, I’d expect to be notified if the “crime” was egregious enough to warrant discipline of special circumstances — only because if my kid was acting up at school enough to warrant punishment, they’d know that whatever happened to them at school would be spring break compared to what they’d get when they got home.

I think it’s important to note that KIPP is a middle-school charter school — the middle school years are pretty harrowing. However, any parent who says that they don’t know what the expectations are are either lazy or illiterate, because the school’s handbook has 13 pages of excrutiating detail regarding behavioral expectations, a complicated rewards/punishment system, and over three pages of charts of incidents that will trigger in-school suspension. It’s a charter school with a great deal of emphasis on personal responsibility.

Personally, I think the principal’s statement that “the school should have done a better job explaining expectations for student conduct” is pretty weak. Why is it such a stretch for kids and parents to know that if you act up in class to the point where you have to be removed, then all hell is going to break loose? It’s a pretty simple concept: Sit down and shut up. Do what the teacher tells you. Do your work. Let the other kids do their work. Why is that so hard to grasp? Schools are not democracies — they are benign dictatorships.

VOICE

March 23rd, 2009
10:22 am

DB, I agree. Parents and students are not held accountable to the extent that they should. Whose responsibility is it to notify the parent when disciplinary action is taken at school? Rightly, it should be the student’s responsibility. Of course, many will not tell their parents, but that should be their problem. A call or letter by the administrator and/or teacher is a mere professional “courtesy”, not a responsibility. Furthermore, parents should initiate routine checks with the school to inquire about the progress of their children.

It’s past time for parents and students to uphold their respective parts in keeping our schools orderly and safe. Disruptive students should be removed from the class immediately. Top priority should be given to the protection of the learnung environment. It’s rather bizarre to think that our schools are the only public place where we allow such disruptive behavior. Removal of the student is not excessive punishment, it’s the same action that would be taken at any other public place.

jim d

March 23rd, 2009
11:32 am

I’d say the question really is why parents were not notified? Not why the teacher wasn’t removed.

Here’s the thing, I read costantly on these blogs that parents are failing, yet when children act out at schools it appears parents are not informed. So, how are parents to do a better job if they are not aware of the problem? Communications between parents and the school is paramount to teachers having any kind of classroom control.

You can take some of the best behaved students and place then in a disruptive classroom and the mob mentallity will take over even their self control. Bottom line here? I guess I fail to understand why the school did not address the issue with parents before it got out of hand, most of the parents I know would have dealt with their children with appropriate means. Then too, consider these are parents of children attending a charter school and one would therefore believe a bit more involved with their childrens education than those one might find in a regular school.

Sounds to me like someone in admin. may have dropped the ball on this one.

catlady

March 23rd, 2009
11:32 am

Parents were not there. Teachers were. End of story.

If your child continues to act up in school, you should expect there to be intense consequences, even if you don’t impose them. It is really, at this age, between the child and the school. They are old enough, and sentient enough, to do as they are required to do.

These parents are doing more to hurt their kids than they can imagine, and my disgust is with the school for in any way apologizing.

Let the parents pull the kids out and send them back to their neighborhood schools. Let the kids who will behave learn.

Next thing you know there will be a lawsuit or outside groups will start yelling discrimination.

Boo hoo. Behave yourself and this won’t happen. It is as simple as that.

jim d

March 23rd, 2009
11:40 am

Cat,

according to the article the students actions were accumulative over “several days”. I still question why parents were not informed. The article fails to mention if the teacher followed protocol by informing the administartion of the issues or if the admin. just failed to support the teacher early on. Certainly they did after the fact (and I commend them for that), but one must question their actions early on.

reality2

March 23rd, 2009
11:51 am

cat,

I hope our plices will not use the same logic when they are prosecuting the criminals – police officers’ words are always correct because they were there??? That’s such a ridiculous notion. By the way, STUDENTS were there, too.

If teachers ask something stupid, then students have every right to refuse or do something else. Some teachers can’t accept anything other than what s/he thinks is the correct answers. They can’t make sense of alternative solutions because of their lack of content knowledge. Some “disruptions” are because students can’t make sense of what teachers are saying.

I wonder if KIPP manual includes the refusal to let students go to bathroom as an allowable punishment – it sure does not sound like it.

Reality2

March 23rd, 2009
11:52 am

cat,

I hope our plices will not use the same logic when they are prosecuting the criminals – police officers’ words are always correct because they were there??? That’s such a ridiculous notion. By the way, STUDENTS were there, too.

If teachers ask something stupid, then students have every right to refuse or do something else. Some teachers can’t accept anything other than what s/he thinks is the correct answers. They can’t make sense of alternative solutions because of their lack of content knowledge. Some “disruptions” are because students can’t make sense of what teachers are saying.

I wonder if KIPP manual includes the refusal to let students go to bathroom as an allowable punishment – it sure does not sound like it.

Clueless

March 23rd, 2009
11:55 am

I don’t see how separating disruptive students from the others is cruel or unusual, and I don’t think that making students sit on the floor is terrible either. I see students sitting on the floor of their own free will before and after school, as well as during lunch and recess.

Keep it up KIPP!

March 23rd, 2009
11:57 am

Finally, a school that gets it. Don’t back down! Don’t kowtow to the spineless, excuse making portion of our society that has no clue! Keep up the good work!

If you don’t have discipline, you don’t have education, no two ways about it. KIPP gets this; don’t let the naysayers, who could teach a class without donning a pair of Depends, bring you down. Stick to your guns.

Reality 2

March 23rd, 2009
12:15 pm

cat,

I sure hope police officers are allowed to use the same argument. We know, unfortunately, that just because police officers were there doesn’t mean that their stories are complete or even true. What makes teachers any different? Besides, STUDENTS were there, also.

I wonder if KIPP manual states that refusing to let students to go to bathroom is an appropriate punishment.

When schools/teachers ask students to do something stupid, students should have every right to refuse. Too often teachers think students are “disrupting” their lessons because they have different ideas — some teachers just don’t have enough content knowledge to judge whether or not students’ ideas are valid, and if not, how to help them realize their thinking may be flawed. Instead, they just tell kids to “shut up and sit down.” I hope more students (and parents) will refuse to accept such a behavior from teachers.

Reality

March 23rd, 2009
12:15 pm

Too many parents don’t even discipline their own offspring. Now, they don’t want schools to, either…. go figure.

Get a clue! If your child cannot behave, it is your own darn fault. You should teach your own children how to behave and to show respect for others. If you have failed in this mission, are you REALLY shocked that your child gets into troule at school?

Schools don’t have time to teach such manners because the there is too much content to teach. When schools spend time on behavior issues, it is just not good all the way around. I would prefer for schools to just pick up the phone and call for that brat to be taken away from school. Let the “bad” parents deal with their own “bad” kids.

jim d

March 23rd, 2009
12:17 pm

Keep it up KIPP,

“If you don’t have discipline, you don’t have education”

I’ll take it one step further. If you don’t have communications you don’t have education

jim d

March 23rd, 2009
12:19 pm

Reality,

Do we understand the concept of mob mentallity?

I dare say you could take some of the best behaved students in the world and get them acting out in a mob of disruptive students.

jim d

March 23rd, 2009
12:29 pm

An inuiring mind can’t help but wonder why it took “several days” of disruption for anything to come down and why it wasn’t handled a bit quicker?

Wally

March 23rd, 2009
12:52 pm

We are now paying through the nose for the ant-intellectualism, prohibition and drug wars in which the electorate has immersed itself over the last couple of decades. Students en masse, even some in charter schools, consider themselves on one side, and teachers and administrators on the other. And I will never forget the comment of a journalist years ago: “This is now a drug culture, and everybody lies.” Anyone who takes those children’s stories at face value needs to be sentenced to a week or two observing what goes on in our schools. I have friends and family in education. In instance after instance I have heard tell of students caught red handed in bald face lies to parents and authorities. And I have also witnessed parents backing their children again and again, despite long histories of lying, so ingrained is the public disdain for “guvment.” Talk about a self-fulfilling prophecy. Thanks, Ronald.

Readers are probably asking themselves how I can be so certain about who is lying. Let me tell you, in the county in which I live, you have to be a saint to continue to work in the public school setting. The chaff gets weeded out literally within weeks.

high school teacher

March 23rd, 2009
1:00 pm

I find it interesting that the word “immediately” is used in combination with the phrase “she was not allowed to use the restroom.” Was it at the beginning of class? Did the child have the opportunity to go between class change and not use that opportunity? Did the child have a history of asking to go to the bathroom when she really didn’t go? Did the teacher say, “Wait 5 minutes?” There is more to the story there than what is being reported here. Many times I will tell a child to wait a few minutes before I allow them to go to the restroom. Keep in mind that I teach high school and that students have time to go during class change. I have seen high school students take advantage of a situation of this sort.

V for Vendetta

March 23rd, 2009
1:03 pm

Reality 2, been hugging any trees lately? I don’t know many teachers who are scared of the “different” ideas students have. That’s just about the dumbest excuse for bad behavior I’ve heard yet.

dingis magee

March 23rd, 2009
1:23 pm

Bad behaviour starts at home. Parents want to be popular with their kids and be their friend instead of being parents and being very clear about what is misbehaviour and what is not. Kids needing counseling, give me a break. Learn to behave and you will not have these problems. Yes, there are a million excuses and reasons why parents give that their students misbehave, but the biggest reason is that this misbehaviour is not dealt with at home. IT ALL STARTS WITH DISCIPLINE, THAT IS WHY MANY OF OUR PUBLIC SCHOOLS TODAY AREN’T WORTH A DARN, THE KIDS RUN THE SCHOOLS, DO WHAT THEY WANT, INTIMIDATE THE TEACHERS AND ADMINISTRATORS, AND GRADUATE WITH A “COMPUTER” NOVA NET DIPLOMA AND CAN’T GET OUT OF A SHOWER OF RAIN….GOOD FOR YOU, KEEP THE DISCIPLINE UP, SOMEONE MIGHT ACTUALLY LEARN SOMETHING….

jim d

March 23rd, 2009
1:27 pm

HST,

As I understand there are several medical conditions that may lead to loss of bladder control in young ladies. They include things like urinary tract and bladder infections, constipation and/or side effects from certain medication.

It is not really unusal for women to experience both stress and urge incontinence at different times of their life. I believe to infer it may have been in spite may be a bit presumputious.

Fulton Teacher

March 23rd, 2009
1:41 pm

Although I’m a teacher, I see this a little differentl than some of you. First of all, if a child is repeatedly being disruptive, parents need to be notified. At least give them the opportunity to assist. After being a middle school teacher for 15 years, I can tell you that even the best raised kid will begin to act out during the middle school years. I experienced it with my own kids.

Secondly, I agree with High School Teacher about the circumstances regarding the restroom. However, if the child asked again, which we don’t know, she should’ve been allowed to go.

Honestly, I’ve seen some pretty mean-spirited teachers in recent years and I have begun to question what type of person the profession is attracting. I’ve actually had a teacher tell me that she tried her best to hurt a student’s feelings that she just didn’t like. This situation could’ve been handled a better by communicating with parents more.

catlady

March 23rd, 2009
1:46 pm

I don’t think a middle school should have to call home to tell on a kid who is disrupting class as long as the child is of average intelligence. If the child was five years old, I would feel differently. In our school ISS is frequently the same. You have continued misbehavior that disrupts class. You try several ways of dealing with it (documenting each time). When that doesn’t work, you isolate the child and send a report to the parents.

Most of our misbehaving kids hate being isolated from their friends. They get a lot of pleasure from the attention. They hate being in a situation where they cannot carry the class down the primrose path. We do have some repeat offenders but most of the kids find it quite joyless to have no interaction with their peers.

Re the bathroom, I don’t know that we can even begin to speculate. We have kids who claim to need to go every ten minutes. Some of the girls would have you think they need to change their sanitary supplies 4 weeks out of every month!

What would help misbehaving kids the most would be to keep them out of the papers, and for their parents to say, “I don’t care what–you stay out of trouble.” And then, if there are concerns, PRIVATELY go see the teacher about it, but don’t let your child know that you are questioning the teacher’s call. The “I’ll go down there and straighten those teachers out” does not help your child in the least to bring their behavior in line.

And if you don’t like what your charter school requires, consider transfering and see if you like the other place better.

high school teacher

March 23rd, 2009
1:52 pm

Sorry, jim d, didn’t mean to be presumptuous. I was pointing out that we don’t know the whole story, and to jump to conculsions about who is the guilty party is a bit presumptuous in and of itself. I was playing devil’s advocate for those who blame the teachers. I absolutely understand that the child may have had a legitimate problem. However, perhaps I am a bit jaded based on my personal experiences! :)

high school teacher

March 23rd, 2009
1:54 pm

If I double post, I am sorry. Jim d, I didn’t mean to be presumptuous. I was just playing devil’s advocate for those who automatically blame the teacher. The point is that we don’t know all of the facts and to place blame on either party is presumptuous in and of itself.

Dr. Craig Spinks

March 23rd, 2009
2:08 pm

Short of slamming a student in the back of his head with a textbook for failing to write his name on the top line of the Math paper(as Brother Hugh did to me at Aquinas High in Augusta in 1961), almost anything goes. My impression after more than 32 years in state-funded schools is that school board attorneys are too lazy, too “wussified”, or a combination thereof, to back our school boards as they must move to reassrt ADULT CONTROL over our public schools.

Dr. Craig Spinks

March 23rd, 2009
2:10 pm

CORRECTION: “reassert” in the penultimate line of my entry.

high school teacher

March 23rd, 2009
2:12 pm

for some reason my post keeps getting blocked.

high school teacher

March 23rd, 2009
2:14 pm

Okay, jim d, I had two eloquent posts about not meaning to be presumptuous, but for some reason they didn’t go through! :) anyway, I was just saying that I was playing devil’s advocate to those who automatically blame the teachers, and that we don’t know the entire story, so it’s difficult to make any conclusions.

jim d

March 23rd, 2009
2:19 pm

HST,

yeah the new format sucks

jim d

March 23rd, 2009
2:21 pm

Doc,

Then too attorneys sometimes know when they can’t win a case.

All too often schools do screw up.

jim d

March 23rd, 2009
2:23 pm

doc,

sometimes attorneys know when they can’t win.

all too aften schools do screw up.

jim d

March 23rd, 2009
2:24 pm

I hate this new format!!

Well, I suppose it would be ok if it would just work!!(are u listening AJC?)

Reality 2

March 23rd, 2009
2:47 pm

Fulton Teacher,

I agree with your observation. You see some of those mean spirited teachers here as well.

V,

Teachers actually don’t really know what other teachers do because they don’t go observe them teach much. It’s actually non-teachers who do get to see MANY teachers, and thus able to make some generalizations based on observations, not just what other teachers tell you.

Scalia

March 23rd, 2009
2:51 pm

How does a school screw up? I have a student that is a constant disruption in my class. I call his father, he speaks to his son, and tells him to apologize. He apologizes, and then keeps acting up. What is a teacher supposed to do?

high school teacher

March 23rd, 2009
3:12 pm

last attempt to post this – jim d, didn’t mean to accuse the girl of wrong doing. just pointing out that we don’t know the whole story.

my other 3 posts were much more eloquent, but i don’t feel like typing it again.

Doret Ledford

March 23rd, 2009
3:22 pm

I am a children’s advocate, and I think that our parents today need more parenting. Our children are not properly taken care of and discipline is very poor. Children are allowed to do as they please and have not respect for parents and adults, and this is carried over into the schooll systems where no one is allowed to speak to the children without parents get offended. I think if the children are well disciplined, and many of them are, then they would not have to be discipline for misbehaving. I agree that children will misbehave and we as adults, whether it is our parents or teachers should have the right to reprimand them. I do not believe that any teacher will mistreat a child to the point of harming them. I remember when any adult was allowed to draw the line when a child gets out of hand. We want our children to be respected to have a good education, but we must do our parts. PARENTS AND ADULTS! START TRAINING THE CHILDREN FROM THEY ARE SMALL AND THEY WILL GROW INTO RESPECTABLE AND EDUCATED LADIES AND GENTLEMEN. Good luck!

Tony

March 23rd, 2009
3:55 pm

KIPP schools are not all they are cracked up to be, but the brouhaha over discipline is out of proportion. The school, all schools, have the right to isolate students from the general population if their behavior is disruptive to the school. It works better when schools let parents know immediately when there is a problem, which is what we do. I want parents to support the discipline measures that are taken to maintain appropriate classroom behavior. This is apparently where the KIPP school messed up. None of our schools should give in to the loud parents who object when their children are disciplined appropriately.

As for KIPP schools in general, it is time for the media to cut the crap about these schools and report the real facts. KIPP schools are notorious for high turnover. This distorts the reported results that come from KIPP schools as far as test scores go. But, this is a topic for another day. Do a little digging on KIPP schools before you fall for the hype.

Laura Diamond

March 23rd, 2009
4:16 pm

Sorry about the posting problems everyone. For some reason the spam filter was blocking many of you. I think I fixed it, but if you are having any more problems, please email me.

Fulton Teacher

March 23rd, 2009
4:22 pm

Catlady, parents deserve to know when their child is such a disruption that they’re being isolated for several days. You can’t complain that parents aren’t supportive, then decide that you don’t need to clue them in. Middle school kids are the most difficult to teach. They’ll always want to show off in front of their peers. I’ve had so many parents tell me how their child completely changed when they hit 6th grade. Then I experienced it myself! Yes there are poor parents, but there are many caring parents that want to know so that they can support you. If we were talking about one or two days I’d agree with you, but this went on over several days.

jim d

March 23rd, 2009
4:39 pm

HST,——–it was just the inference, point i was also making is there’s more to this story.

Scalia ——–How does a school screw up?

You gotta be Shi^^n me! Don’t make the assumption that School = teacher, then look at all the law suits that get settled out of court.

Doret—–” I do not believe that any teacher will mistreat a child to the point of harming them.

“Wake up and smell the coffee, while you are at it pick up a news paper.

Tony——”It works better when schools let parents know immediately when there is a problem”

AMEN!

Laura—-THANKS

Fulton Teach, —— “You can’t complain that parents aren’t supportive, then decide that you don’t need to clue them in”

Bless you

jim d

March 23rd, 2009
4:41 pm

Obviously Doret has never met or read one of our regular bloggers.

Pat

March 23rd, 2009
5:26 pm

If I had been disciplined in school, my parents would have made that just a walk in the park. They would not have questioned whether the teacher was too harsh or whether I deserved to be punished in that manner. They would have assumed that I deserved to be punished and would have continued the job when I got home. If my son acted up and got punished in school, the same applied. No, he didn’t act up in grade school, high school and college. He is now a vice-president of his firm. Coincidence? Hardly.

I think it is wonderful that the parents took the troublemakers out of the school. Now, if I was a parent near there, that would be the place I would send my kids. Normally, schools cannot expel the undisciplined. By taking them out of class, the stupid parents who beget stupid and disrespectful kids are solving the problem.

Gram

March 23rd, 2009
5:39 pm

My son got into trouble in elementary school quite often.(1980’s) Finally, the principal called and asked if it was ok to paddle him. I told him he had my full cooperation, and to “go for it”. He never acted up again!

Keep it up KIPP!

March 23rd, 2009
5:42 pm

Tony is right in that comparing the results KIPP gets to regular public schools is like comparing apples and oranges, due to the high turnover. I say don’t hate KIPP; let the public schools do what KIPP does.

Let’s notstop with saying buzzwords like differentiated instruction and actually do something different, like remove the students who are determined to disrupt learning at every turn. That would be real reform, not this bondoggle we are paying billions of dollars a year for.

catlady

March 23rd, 2009
6:05 pm

Mine got blocked–and it was so pithy, too! Dang!

Regarding teachers not knowing what other teachers do: Well, I do. I am a “push in” (not to be confused with push over). As a push in, I am in 8 teacher’s classes a day. Last year it was 7. So that is over half the teachers in our school. Don’t think the teachers don’t know what is going on!

On parent notification: No problem with notifying parents. But it should be the CHILD who notifies their parents that they are in trouble, first, IMHO. If your child is old enough to talk, and intelligent enough to state facts, that is.

I think if parents got the notifications they say they want, many would (and have) thrown up their hands and said, “Don’t be calling me anymore!”

Besides, shouldn’t MIDDLE SCHOOL students be able to take responsibility for their actions.

When our asst. principal calls parents, they frequently tell her they don’t agree with the punishment. She is always perplexed. They sign the handbook stating they are aware of the rules and consequences; so does the student. Unless they want to come to school and continuously monitor their child….

PappyHappy

March 23rd, 2009
6:20 pm

Perhaps it is time for some parents to take heed; teach and enforce manners and discipline at home; request information from the school if the child is misbehaving where the parent can reenforce discipline at home, and THANK THE SCHOOL FOR HAVING STANDARDS!!

pj

March 23rd, 2009
6:48 pm

based on most of these comments (many of which I agree with) I am surprised that 75% voted that the “punishment” was too harsh. Maybe that majority which doesn’t seem to be taking the time to comment is a slack about disciplining their children, and somehow expects a school to be able to operate without it. continuing the national trend of spoiled brats not accepting responsiblity for their behavior.

DeeMack

March 23rd, 2009
8:09 pm

First of all, if your kid comes home and says he is being yelled at 10 hours a day, SOMETHING IS WRONG! Now, I don’t agree with a kid being made to pee over herself and that should have been avoided. However, what this is called as far as being separated from the rest of group during lunch is “silent lunch”. My now young adult boys have been through this a time or to. If there were 9 kids in a group being disruptive, then you have to single them out. Most kids talk too much anyway. That is what they do. A teacher MUST have control of her class and that includes all children. For you all to think that a kid is going to tell their parents they were disruptive and got into trouble, I say laugh and laugh hard. If a teacher did not inform me of the disruptive behavior, I would have never known, and I was not one of those mamsy-pansy parents, either. I look at my sons, ages 23 and 19, and I say thank you God we made it through those school years!

Atl123

March 23rd, 2009
8:11 pm

To condense what I have read in the article (which in my opinion demonstrates that the AJC is really eschewing investigative journalism and going for the quick fix as far as reporting is concerned), the students were given timeout (i.e. told to sit in the back of the classroom) and NOT sent from the room, but still in the class to participate(this aspect of the “punishment” was not elaborated by the AJC) in the lesson or at the very least be there while the lesson was happening. The students were given seven days of “silent lunch” meaning that they were to eat their lunch in silence, not allowed to socialize -while their peers who were not being punished for disruptive or disrespectful behavior and were allowed to engage in normal lunchtime activity-. This story is a red herring. There was no undue punishment at the school. Of course parents are allowed to defend their children, but I’m reading reporting on the reactive behavior on the part of the parents (according to the AJC) and not much about discussion regarding WHY the students were being punished. Parents who have difficulty taking responsibility for their child’s behavior and don’t encourage their child to take responsibility for their behavior ( I’m not saying these parents do or don’t, I am making a point) might perhaps remember the “harsh” punishment that happened in back in their child’s school days when they may have to stand in front of a judge and say, “but your honor,I don’t understand, (my girl or boy) is such a good child.

C. B. Rae

March 23rd, 2009
8:37 pm

I happen to be a parent at this school and I am going to assume that those commenting here are not. So far bloggers have made great points… the one that sticks out the most is communication. For some reason schools today think that parents turn over all rights to their children from 8 am to 3pm. That is not the case. An sorry but teachers I am not buying the wolf ticket you are selling that when you call parents a majority of them do not respond or react to the problem..when they are notified. If a parent knows their child and knows what that child is capable of –and they should— then they know when their child is selling them a line..and when they are telling the truth. I am pass the blame stages at this point and think this whole thing could have been avoid had communication been better on all sides. Administrators, Board Members, and Parents are suppose to be working together to education the future generations instead all sides are divided and pointing fingers. This is foolish and counter productive. There is enough blame to go around. No child I don’t care how bad should face humiliation. And no Teacher should have to put up with disrespect. It is a two-way street. The one problem I have found with the KIPP method is that the assumption is always that because these kids are consider “lower income, minority ” then it is natural that they would be lacking and therefore incapable of behaving. Sorry but I don’t buy that. As someone else pointed out most of the children that attend charter school come with parents who are active in their child’s education. KIPP’s national presence is not about tough discipline and is suppose to be more about educating children so that they know they have just as much right to higher education as anyone else regardless of background. That message and mission appears to have gotten lost in this whole mess. The one thing I would like to see come out of all of this is more and better communication. There is a whole lot of us vs them going on and less open communication. As a parent we don’t have all the answers, but guess what teachers even with the teacher’s guide, neither do you.

Chris

March 23rd, 2009
8:49 pm

More of that good black parenting huh? The black parents should do a better job raising their kids. Of course, once something happens to their kids, it is NEVER the parents fault, as usual. Gee I wonder why so many blacks are not in school, in jail, etc.