Public-Private debate: Is AA the next to split?

The GHSA split Class A into public and private divisions this academic year, but that hasn’t ended private-school domination elsewhere.

Even with only 10 private schools in AAA and AA, private schools have won 10 of the 17 AAA/AA state titles so far. The 113 public schools in AAA and AA have claimed the other seven.

That doesn’t count swimming, which doesn’t have AAA or AA classes, but a combined AAAAA-A. If that sport had AAA and AA, it would be 14 to 7, privates ahead. Westminster has its own pool, after all.

But it’s not just swimming and cross country and volleyball that the privates have dominated.

Last week, private school athletic superiority was evident on the hardwood of the basketball state finals in Macon. Greater Atlanta Christian (boys) and Wesleyan (girls) won the Class AA championships. GAC’s average margin of victory was 25.4 points. Wesleyan’s was 38. Both won their state championship games by wide margins.

In AAA, private school St. Pius won its third state championship this academic season with its girls basketball team. St. Pius won both cross country state titles.

Johnson, one of Savannah’s public schools, won the AAA boys title. What if Marist had chosen to play AAA, where its enrollment falls, instead of AAAA? Perhaps Johnson still wins, but it’s something to think about.

To the public schools’ credit, they have swept AAA and AA championships in softball, wrestling and cheerleading.

As for the privates, note that it’s really the metro Atlanta seven that do the damage. They are Blessed Trinity, St. Pius and Woodward Academy in AAA and Westminster, Greater Atlanta Christian, Lovett and Wesleyan in AA. All seven have won state titles so far.  The three outside of metro Atlanta are largely benign. Those are Benedictine, St. Vincent’s and Riverside Military Academy. That’s two military schools and a girls Catholic school.

The reasons for the sports success of private schools are often debated. Private schools usually have better athletics facilities and resources than public schools, and student-athletes and their parents increasingly want to be a part of that. Private schools also may enroll students from anywhere. Public schools are largely restricted to students living in their school districts.

What do you propose to do?

- Reinstate the multiplier and have private schools compete at their enrollment level times 1.5 or 2.0.

- Further divide public and private schools into upper and lower private and upper public divisions. Consider all-classification championship in sports that would allow it.

- Leave it the way it is. Seven state championships per sport are too many as it is. Public schools just need to compete better.

123 comments Add your comment

black12

March 12th, 2013
10:54 am

Honestly, I think private should play in AAA or above. But its basketball and you can only play 5 at a time.

Ernest

March 12th, 2013
11:08 am

This is a tough question. Deep down, we all know that schools with more resources, both public and private, seem to get the talented athletes and students. Yes, even the student known for being a good debater may look at schools with long traditions of winning tournaments and consider attending (if possible). Some may recall hearing stories about Valdosta years ago ‘helping’ find jobs for the parents of great athletes, allowing them to attend that school. These kinds of things get far more visibility now than it did years ago.

Everyone wants to compete against the best, whether it is a public or private school. Usually the more well funded schools win more in the long run.

Single A

March 12th, 2013
11:34 am

IT’S CALLED RECRUITING, PEOPLE! I DON”T CARE WHAT KIND OF SPIN YOU TRY TO PUT ON IT OR WHAT CLASSIFICATION IT IS. IT IS STILL RECRUITING>

athensbball

March 12th, 2013
11:39 am

I like the multiplier rule or just say that privates have to play up a class. i think enrollment should also be looked at more closely. im pretty sure that at the rate GAC has been growing the past few years they probably have hit the max for AA.

athensbball

March 12th, 2013
11:40 am

@singleA: and if the athlete makes a bonafide move then there is nothing you are GHSA can do about it. recruited or not. the multiplier/play up a class would make it a more level playing field

STOP COMPLAINING

March 12th, 2013
11:43 am

Private school parents pay for their kids education and YOURS. My kids attend a private school by choice, and it requires sacrifices. As I recall, I pay property taxes for a public school education that I never utilize(but others do) AND I pay the full ride at a private school. Since I’m spending my money for educating my child, and others are spending my money(taxes) and the money of ALL private school parents for funding their child’s education, how is this somehow a funding disadvantage for public schools?

It’s true that lower classification public schools(A-AAA) tend to be in rural towns and lower economic urban areas. BUT they all get tax dollars to build and maintain their facilities, pay their teachers and administrators, and to pay for their athletic programs. Private school parents contribute taxes to pay for public school infrastructure, AND they foot 100% of the bill for all these things at their kids private school. When new fields, uniforms, facilities, etc. are needed they reach into their own pockets and fund capital campaigns. When public schools want to do any of these things, they raise taxes via SPLOSTS of other mechanisms(which private school parents pay for as well).

If you want to find the root of the disparity, it’s the way the educational tax dollars for public schools are allocated and spent(which far exceed, on a per student basis, what private schools have to work with).

Face it -private schools do more, with less per student, and the parents CHOOSE to do this while still paying for an education that they don’t use(at a public school).

Maybe kids raised in families that have to make tough economic choices about education just are a little more motivated when they go to class, or perform on an athletic field.

But don’t tell me that public schools are at a funding disadvantage, or that public schools don’t take liberal advantage of the worthless hardship transfer rule in the state of Georgia(Buford, Norcross, Wheeler, Lassiter this year in football, Milton, etc) to attract in whatever talent they want for their athletic programs.

At least at a private school, if a parent wants their child to attend, the parents have to foot the bill.

Abolish the GHSA and it’s worthless transfer rule. Make ANY student that changes schools(public or private) have to wait one entire calendar year before they can play a varsity sport. This rule exists in other states, and it helps prevent the opportunistic transfers that are the REAL root of the competitive imbalance in Georgia HS sports.

Know it all

March 12th, 2013
11:44 am

Why divide all the sports the same? Let football divide into 7 classifications, let basketball divide into however many divisions fit them best and so on… let individualized sports have less classifications heck even just one classification- track, cross country, golf, wrestling, and others should have just one champ….

All Classification

March 12th, 2013
11:48 am

And the Miltons, Wheelers, Norcrosses, of the world, who kids transfer to ( “recruited” ) all the time, what happens there? They get a multiplier?
And Buford, Decatur, Cartersville, etc. The city schools that can get players outside their district if they pay tuition, exactly like a private school. They get separated also? or they get the multiplier?
And if you already in the largest class, then recruit away I guess???
How about some critical thinking on this matter instead of howling at the moon !!

athensbball

March 12th, 2013
11:56 am

How bout just let kids go to whatever school they want to go to (thats what is going on anyways since the GHSA is too understaffed to look into it or to care) And then use the number of transfers a school gets as some sort of multiplier….in other words…if you get X amount of transfers per year then you must play up X number of classifications.

some sense

March 12th, 2013
12:20 pm

Oh, boy, here we go again. Poor guy even goes to the ALL CAPS to maintain that recruitng is the reason independent schools win more. Here are the real reasons:

1.) Private school students come from two-parent families, and both parents are typically high achievers. These are the world’s best role models, right there in the home. High achieving parents beget high achieving children who want to be like them.

2.) Private schools have better facilities, funded, by the way, by the parents who send their children there, not by city or county government. Public school students show up to play at private schools and wonder why they can”t have the same. How many home games do you think private schools lose?

3.) Private schools are, on the whole, managed better than public schools. Put the DeKalb or Clayton County school boards in charge of private schools and all of a sudden the same losing trickle down effect would settle the “problem” for once and for all.

John

March 12th, 2013
12:24 pm

Where does it end? Do you then separate the academically superior school systems like Calhoun, Bremen and Rome because they attract parents who want their children to get a better education and who drive those school numbers up? Do you separate public schools that have more resources and better facilities from those that don’t? Go to six classes and put everybody together. If small public schools don’t want to play private schools, the public schools can play in Class AAA. Public schools need to stop whining that their coaches and parents aren’t as good as those in private schools.

Truth in reporting

March 12th, 2013
12:25 pm

STOP COMPLAINING NAILED IT! I have had 3 kids go through the Private system and compete on the college level and NONE of the 3 were recruited to attend the school we chose. We chose our schol because of the education that they would NOT have gotten in the public school we are districted into.

Ernest

March 12th, 2013
12:31 pm

Face it -private schools do more, with less per student, and the parents CHOOSE to do this while still paying for an education that they don’t use(at a public school).

STOP COMPLAINING, I agree with much of what you said however additional clarity should be provided with this statement. Private schools can CHOOSE the student they keep, reject and expel. A part of the reason education costs have exploded is due to federal and state regulations/compliance for ADA and special needs students. Parents for these students want a good education however unless they can afford private schools with additional services, they choose public schools. This is a general statement and can vary from family to family. As a result, it can be cheaper to educate a child in a private school rather than a public one.

I know of some Atlanta area private schools that have endowments larger than several colleges in this state. At the end of the day, money talks.

Todd Holcomb

March 12th, 2013
12:32 pm

”if you get X amount of transfers per year then you must play up X number of classifications.”

It’s not the number of transfers, IMO. It’s the quality of the transfers. We did a story last year on the number of student-athlete transfers at each school. It didn’t have that high a correlation with sports success.

Todd Holcomb

March 12th, 2013
12:46 pm

”Private school students come from two-parent families, and both parents are typically high achievers. These are the world’s best role models, right there in the home. High achieving parents beget high achieving children who want to be like them.”

Is this the crux of the matter? Private schools, once they are established, can cherry pick the ”high achieving children” that they want among a large pool of applicants. Public schools must take who lives in their district, no matter what their achievement potential is. Private schools draft their students among those who apply. Public schools are assigned their students.

Is this a competitive advantage, and is it worth considering in classification?

That Dude Says...

March 12th, 2013
1:02 pm

Split the private and public schools in every class.

All the private school people claiming to send their kids to private school for the “education” should really care less about what the GHSA does. It’s all about that private school education right?? Let the private schools have their own state titles. Then when the more powerful private schools start dominating the lesser ones the elitist can fight amongst each other.

Hootie

March 12th, 2013
1:14 pm

Everyone who writes these comments must understand that they are only opinions and at the end it doesn’t matter what we comment on. 1. It depends on the GHSA and Ralph. 2. School Board members have the most power over a public school, even members on the board without college diplomas, which is very sad because they are making decisions that affect people with college degrees of a Masters and higher…IMO that is such a flawed system.
So to debate the issue of Private and Public then private schools need to follow the same rules as public schools. Which means either every school can recruit within private and public OR neither private or public can recruit. Everyone needs to follow the same regulations and guidelines if they are going to compete for the same State Championships.

ahtensbball

March 12th, 2013
1:26 pm

@Todd: “Public schools must take who lives in their district, no matter what their achievement potential is”
Yes Todd, by definition and in a perfect world, public schools must do that. But can anyone really sit here with a straight face and say that teams like Milton, Wheeler, Norcross, and even Eagles Landing this year, all just happened to be blessed with 5-6 D1 players on a public school basketball team? There is the perfect world and then there is reality.

black12

March 12th, 2013
1:29 pm

Just let all private play in AAA or AAAA and issue solved. So all private schools parents are married???? What about divorce or single parents? Are they not allowed in private schools. I came from a single (black) parent home of four kids. I went to public school. My mother sent 3 of 4 kids to college. All three have masters degrees!!!

Plato

March 12th, 2013
1:33 pm

It will never make sense to include private schools competing against public schools! EVER! There is no way to ascertain the advantages of the private school. What is the value of a cherry picked high school all american basketball player versus 3,000 students that go to the local public school? Maybe the ratio should be 3,000 to 1 instead of 1.5/1 or 2/1. The GHSA was developed to host public school championships and somehow it has evolved into also monitoring the private schools. The only fair thing to do is to spurn all private schools out of the GHSA…let them form their own organization and ways to divvy up those awards. Public schools should not be competing against them since the playing field is Mount Everest with the private schools running down hill and the publics being forced to climb. David had absolutely nothing on this Goliath. It is unfair and actually rewards those less deserving since it was a stacked deck to begin with.

athensbball

March 12th, 2013
1:37 pm

i agree @black. that was an ignorant and snobby comment by that guy. people like him give private schools a bad rap. There used to be a multiplier causing private schools to play up a class. that worked great and we never had these never ending arguments. who knows why they got rid of it….oh thats right…cuz it made since. cant have that at the GHSA

AtlantaParent

March 12th, 2013
1:41 pm

@STOPCOMPLAINING – What a lie! Actually public school parents are are now paying for their children and for yours! How you say? Under the new private school scholarship program state tax dollars are being diverted from the state general fund into private schools at the expense of public schools. The irony is that all of us conservatives have been hoodwinked by our own state reps and senators into believing that this is choice when the reality is that it is nothing more than redistribution of tax dollars with no over-site. Thats right under the scholarship law it is against the law to audit the funds.If I lived in the rural part of the state where school systems have little tax base I would be in revolt.

My son went to Mount Vernon Presbyterian through 5th grade and then attended Ridgeview charter and Riverwood International charter. Both of these are Fulton county schools. We live off of Riverside drive in Fulton county and if you are paying more in property taxes than I am good god!!!

One last thing Marist has played up 2 classifications for years and have won 11 straight directors cup. That is awarded to the school with the best overall athletic program for each classification. That should tell everyone that these other private schools with larger student populations than Marist such as Woodward and Pius etc. do not want to compete on an even playing field they like winning even when they know it is not fair.

athensbball

March 12th, 2013
1:41 pm

@Plato: So what stops teams like Norcross and Wheeler from getting stacked teams full of AAU all-stars year after year…they are both public schools right???? How is that fair to the other public schools that compete without transfers?

athensbball

March 12th, 2013
1:45 pm

@black: several Class A private schools tried to move up last year after we found out that they were going to do the split. The request to move up was denied by the GHSA saying that “it was too late to change”. Be ready….a bunch will be getting out of Class A next year.

metro atl

March 12th, 2013
1:54 pm

what i find humorous about this discussion is that this debate always seems to go on in the lower classifications. Public schools in the higher classes “cherry-pick” kids all the time and no one blinks an eye because it happens ALL OVER metro atlanta. Maybe the big boy classes have already found the answer….”you dont tell on me and I wont tell on you” This problem is mainly because of AAU ball though. Parents and players play together all summer and then team up with each other. The high school coaches do WAY LESS recruiting then you people think. But Im guessing they dont try real hard to stop it when they see the kid dunk from the free-throw line haha

LuvtheGame

March 12th, 2013
2:02 pm

It is no surprise that the private schools can’t understand the position of the public schools. Public school systems are flawed in many ways but we’re talking about sports here. A full private and public split across the board would cover it. Publics that have high transfers (which is easy to notice) use a multiplier. Basketball is affected tremendously with one or two exceptional transfers. Private supporters must understand that they’re at an “unfair advantage”. But again we’re talking about being fair and doing whats right and history has shown that doesn’t matter unless it affects the chosen few.

Todd Holcomb

March 12th, 2013
2:06 pm

”Public schools in the higher classes “cherry-pick” kids all the time and no one blinks an eye because it happens ALL OVER metro atlanta.”

People blink their eyes at that all the time. Aside from the public-private debate, the next most volatile issue in high school sports is the era of transfers and super teams. If people didn’t object to that sort of thing, Milton might be raising a third state championship trophy.

”can anyone really sit here with a straight face and say that teams like Milton, Wheeler, Norcross, and even Eagles Landing this year, all just happened to be blessed with 5-6 D1 players on a public school basketball team?”

I’m not sure if I follow what you’re saying. Yes, public schools attract elite transfers and field super teams. So do private schools. Also, the schools that you list are metro Atlanta schools in higher classifications. There aren’t nearly as many metro Atlanta schools playing in AAA, AA and A, where private schools exist. The Norcross phenomenon isn’t so easily found among smaller public schools outside of the metro.

athensbball

March 12th, 2013
2:06 pm

@luvthegame: So how can you have a mulitiplier if you are already in the highest classification? i.e. Norcross, Wheeler, Milton, etc…..

athensbball

March 12th, 2013
2:12 pm

@todd: my point was that if “super teams” are being “allowed” (lets be real, teams arent just that lucky)to happen with numerous transfers year after year at public schools, then why should the rules be any different in lower classifications? If these “super PUBLIC schools” are going to act like private schools, then how come there is no argument to split them up? Whats the difference?

athensbball

March 12th, 2013
2:18 pm

@todd: I agree that it happens more in Atlanta but Im pretty sure Wilkinson or Turner County or Tift County are good examples of a teams outside of atlanta getting kids from all over. Of course Wilkinson might be a bad example because their coach is also the superintendent of the school district and his entire family runs that school. Who in the world would turn him in?? haha

LuvtheGame

March 12th, 2013
2:21 pm

Miller Grove, Columbia and a few others can be moved up with Norcross, Wheeler and Milton, etc. and combine with the Atlanta privates to create a super region. It would be some very good competition and balanced. Any other 6A region doesn’t really have a chance.

metroatl

March 12th, 2013
2:25 pm

I honestly dont think there is any way to stop the transfers so the GHSA and everyone else should just throw their hands in the air and give up. I was reading an article the other day and the mother of Eagles Landing #3 (cant remember his name) actually said these words…”Im so proud of my son and so glad that we transferred to Eagles Landing for his senior year. Now we have a state championship on our resume for the next level”…WOW. Resume? Really? Is this what high school sports have become? If thats the general thoughts of parents today and they are that desperate for their kids to “make it to the big time” then we all just need to give up. Heaven for bid they get to college through hard work or reading a book.

LuvtheGame

March 12th, 2013
2:31 pm

@metroatl: With the exposure kids get through AAU Basketball, I tell kids if the college already knows you and are interested why transfer. Stay in your community or your school and continue to get better. They know where you are and will still be interested. Brannon Greene comes to mind. Super teams from what I’ve noticed isn’t about great coaching. Its just a stacked team. The kids take bad shots, don’t really play defense, and are not running anything consistently on offense.

bballmomof5

March 12th, 2013
2:34 pm

You also fail perhaps to recognize, that sometimes these “high achievers” who head to a private school want a better education than what they would get in the public school system.
We gave up playing on a ranked AAAAAA team, with HORRIBLE standardized scores and subpar Advanced classes to go to a much smaller private A school where the academics are the top priority and consistantly good basketball is a nice second. We are a family that sacrifices luxuries so we can send them to private school. Like I have told people, not all people are rich that go to private school. Some of us work for a living.
Call me an elitist, but when it comes to the end of the day, I would rather have my kids ready for the rigors of college, then not prepared and play on a top tier team, with poor academics. I played basketball for “insert school of choice” on a resume will get you nowhere.

metroatl

March 12th, 2013
2:37 pm

@luvthegame: i think thats one of the biggest crimes out of all this tranfer stuff is that its pushed great coaches and great role models for kids out of high school sports. the ones that want to do it the right way, can no longer compete with these super teams. Old Marietta coach comes to mind, he retired because he realized that you CANT win consistently at the highest level unless you are accepting transfers. He and many coaches are too competitive to just accept losing so it has pushed them out of the sport.

north ga fan

March 12th, 2013
2:41 pm

@lakeview parent…excuse me…bballmomof5: i get your points, but not everyone has a rhodes scholar kid like you, some of these kids would never get to college if it wasnt for sports.

caneowar

March 12th, 2013
2:47 pm

Stop Complaining. I think you’re wrong. I think in fact, private schools do get state funding. Maybe not as much as the public schools, but I do believe they get some. No one is complaining about private schools per say. I 100% believe that a parent has a right to go to any school where ever they choose. We’re talking about sports here. You know as well as I do that in the majority of high school sporting programs the private schools has a huge advantage.

Sounds to me you’re saying that you shouldn’t have to pay those taxes because your kid doesn’t attend a public school? I also pay those taxes you are talking about. I have no kids in school. Why should my tax dollars go into the public school system? Why don’t all tax payers stop paying taxes if their tax money were to going to schools that they don’t have kids attending? My point being is that if I have to pay those taxes even though I don’t have a kid enrolled in public school, then why shouldn’t? You can afford to send your kids to a private school. Great for you.

Getting back to the debate. Private school’s recruit, I don’t care what you say. The best way to solve the problem is that you should either stay in the GISA or if you want to play with the public schools. All private schools should be required to play in the highest classification regardless of school enrollment. At the very least above AAA. Kind of funny considering I’m a AA fan. I would love to see GAC, Lovett, Westminster and Wesleyan stay in AA for football. It’s the other programs that gives these school’s a huge advantage over the public schools. Some of those programs have no business in AA. Still in the end, I hope the God we don’t go the single A route. I’d hate that.

caneowar

March 12th, 2013
3:03 pm

metroatl ah but you are very wrong. The GHSA as you said can’t stop transfers. Well actually they can. Most of these kids that transfer, transfer solely to play a sport for the school in which they are transferring. That is against GHSA rules. Still the GHSA would have to prove that was the reasoning for transferring so I wouldn’t think a lot of schools will be busted for that rule. I mean that Thomasville kid that played basketball a couple of season’s ago as good as said he transfer to some school in N Georgia because his AUU coach was taking a coaching position up there. No telling how many rules was broken in that scenario. Still though their is something the GHSA can do. They can’t stop transfers, but they sure as heck can make the schools play at a higher classification.

Jacket Fan

March 12th, 2013
3:05 pm

Perhaps our tax dollars can fund some “crying towels” for the public schools. DeKalb and Clayton need to make sure they get their accreditation straightened out before they start worrying about athletics.

Jman20

March 12th, 2013
3:13 pm

I believe if you look at the entire win/loss records of all schools you may see that for every private school that wins the state there are many more private schools that are about at a 500% winning percentage and below. Is it not true that even in class 5a and 6A the same schools for the most part are at the top year end and year out?? MOST with maybe the exception of a few private schools are in business about education not winning state championships in sports as most of them realize that sports is a toll to teach lessons that prepare kids for life and that a state championship earns you nothing but a little immediate recognition and a few pats on the back. Again for every private at the top, there are so many more at 500 and below!!!!Split the Championships between public and private the way class A does it,, that seems to make the most sense because there are MANY private schools that are very weak now and moving them up would be follish to do.

JBC

March 12th, 2013
3:16 pm

Todd,

In response to your posts:

1. One correction: Woodward won “traditional” wrestling in AAA; Banks Co., won “duals.” GHSA has 2 wrestling champions.

2. Your own research — which was well-done, by the way — showed last year that there are many fewer transfers to private schools than is commonly thought. If transfers aren’t the reason private schools win, then what is? See below.

3. Having paid 37 years of private school tuition in total and having watched, over the years, my three kids play varsity football, baseball, lacrosse, volleyball, and swimming, here are my thoughts on why the private schools do well:
a. Facilities and coaches – The private schools spend money on both. While some football booster clubs do make substantial contributions to public programs, the majority of schools don’t have wealthy and well-organized boosters. Over the years, we’ve played schools in metro Atlanta that didn’t have a single sled on their football practice field. Likewise, the private schools generally hire coaches who actually have played and know something about the sport they’re coaching. This is especially so in sports like swimming, lacrosse, golf, etc.
b. The parents – While you seemed incredulous that two-parent families could account for a competitive disparity, I don’t. Private schools have more involved parents with generally greater means. They AREN’T better parents, but they are parents who pay for their kids to go to football and baseball camps; parents who buy private lessons; parents who buy the best equipment; and finally, they are parents who are paying a lot of money — I was paying $60,000 a year for 3, and it’s only gone up since then — and want those kids to go to practice and be respectful and try to learn the game.
c. Kids – The success is NOT due to recruiting. In football, wrestling, track, softball, and basketball, the majority of the kids on the roster are smaller, slower, and — let’s be frank — whiter than the average public school it faces. The private school wins in spite of its kids, NOT because of its kids.

metroatl

March 12th, 2013
3:21 pm

@caneowar: You kinda proved my point. The ghsa CANT stop transfers because there is NO WAY to prove that the reason they moved was not for academics/better life/etc. It’s impossible. So make privates play up a class and be done with it.

bballmomof5

March 12th, 2013
3:23 pm

@ north ga fan
Yes I am proud Lakeview has stellar academics, thanks for calling out the school.
It is all in expectations of the kids. The higher expectations you set, the greater the achievement. You fail to realize we have other children in the school, who are not “Rhodes” scholars, but still set the bar high for them as well, so they can go to college and succeed.

I do like the multiplier for private schools and for those publics who will take out of area kids for a “tuition” fee, i.e. Buford.
I am still up in the air about the power rankings for single A, it needs to be tweaked some more. But I have to admit the ranking was way too accurate.

athensbball

March 12th, 2013
3:31 pm

@bballmom: I hated the power rankings, like most people, but its hard to argue with the results the rankings produced. Seeds 1-8 advanced to the Elite 8. Seeds 1-4 advanced to the Final 4. And Seeds 1 and 2 were in the champ game. I kinda liked the rankings now, but I still am not a fan of the split. I think there should be a mulitiplier and power rankings added to all classes.

north ga fan

March 12th, 2013
3:34 pm

@bballmom: Everything you say is true, but some of these kids have a single parent mom who works 50 hours a week to feed 5 kids and then on top of that the kid has to work to help pay the bills while still in high school and playing sports. Its not the kids fault that education was not made a priority in that household. sometimes sports are the only way out of the cycle

Walker, Texas Ranger

March 12th, 2013
3:47 pm

Here is how you put an end to it. If you transfer, you sit out a season. That is how it was in the 70’s. If you did not move over 50 miles, you sat out a season. That would stop the recruiting and the transfers. Private schools have never made that big an impact on football, it was always the city schools. i.e. Buford and Gainesville. How can anybody complain about GAC winning a couple of titles when you have Buford winning 9 of 10 in football. Just make em sit out a year and it will stop all this mess.

Todd Holcomb

March 12th, 2013
3:48 pm

JBC – Good comments. Thanks for the point about Woodward’s wrestling title. Forgot about the two wrestling c’ships. …

re: Recruiting – I agree w/ you that recruiting is not the reason for private schools’ athletic success. IMO, the recruiting claim is inflammatory and only serves to widen the divide between the public and private supporters.

re: Two-parent families. I’m not incredulous about that at all. It plays into what I was suggesting – that private schools are able to select their students from a pool of applicants.

I wonder what would happen if the GHSA classified schools based on applications and not enrollment.

John5214

March 12th, 2013
3:48 pm

Gee it is really too bad we don’t have this kind of passion as it relates to SAT scores. Where are your priorities, people???

Walker, Texas Ranger

March 12th, 2013
3:49 pm

Well said JBC

Dekalb Co Guy

March 12th, 2013
4:00 pm

Well there is not enough private schools in AA and AAA combine to really split. I doubt that an upper/lower private is the answer either. I tend to like the idea of the applied multiplier to balance things a bit. I think 2.0 is too much, maybe 1.5 like it was before would be ideal.

Among the privates, I do commend Marist for playing up. St.Pius, Lovett, Westminister, Woodward, GAC generally dont do that. I think it would be ideal to see thsoe teams play up a classification. And a 1.5 would at least move some of the Class A privates up to AA. I am not a fan of the 7 state championships. Thats too many. I dont even like 6, wish they could go back to 5.