GHSA rejects proposal to allow competition against GISA schools

Private and public high school athletics will remain separate for the time being.
The Georgia High School Association rejected a proposal that would allow public and private schools to compete, Monday during the GHSA’s biannual executive committee meeting in Macon.
The debate occurs almost on an annual basis. Traditionally, Georgia Independent School Association members had been the ones to request the ability to play GHSA public schools. However, this year’s proposal came from a group of GHSA public schools from rural south Georgia that hoped to cut travel cost by playing local GISA schools.
The proposal was shot down before it even made it to the executive committee for a vote, but GHSA executive director Ralph Swearngin believes the issue is not going away and remained open to inter-organization play in the future.
“There are still significant differences in transfer eligibility rules between the GISA and GHSA,” Swearngin said. “I also worry that if we have some of our member schools using up slots in the schedules outside the region to play GISA teams, that it might be hard for some of member schools to fill out their schedules.”

By David Purdum / For the AJC

Private and public high school athletics will remain separate for the time being.

The Georgia High School Association rejected a proposal that would allow member schools to compete against Georgia Independent School Association teams, Monday during the GHSA’s biannual executive committee meeting in Macon.

The debate occurs nearly every year, said GHSA executive director Ralph Swearngin. Traditionally, GISA members had been the ones to request the ability to play GHSA public schools. However, this year’s proposal came from a group of GHSA public schools from rural south Georgia that hoped to cut travel costs by playing local GISA schools.

The proposal was shot down before it even made it to the executive committee for a vote, but Swearngin believes the issue is not going away and remains open to inter-organization play in the future.

“There are still significant differences in transfer eligibility rules between the GISA and GHSA,” Swearngin said. “I also worry that, if we have some of our member schools using up slots in the schedules outside the region to play GISA teams,  it might be hard for some of member schools to fill out their schedules.”

12 comments Add your comment

Tom

September 18th, 2012
7:36 pm

This hurts both GISA and GHSA. Take football…there are so few schools in GISA that even play football. And many of those of schools aren’t good. It hurts GHSA because several GISA are within short driving distances, and there are several schools in GHSA that came from GISA and they have longstanding rivalries.

Rinny

September 18th, 2012
7:42 pm

The only difference in eligibility is if you transfer in during season. The deadline for GISA is closer to the end of the season than in GHSA. That’s it! It’s actually easier to be eligible in GHSA because GISA schools are stronger academically (as a whole of course). The statement in the above article is a cop out.

YellowJacket

September 18th, 2012
8:35 pm

Poor move by the GHSA. First you have the separation of private schools and public in Class 1A and now this. Well I hope GISA keeps trying to move forward. If I was on the board of directors I would consider allowing competition between public and private schools in nearby states such as Florida, S.C., Alabama, Tennessee, etc… This has worked tremedously in other states such as California, New Jersey, and Illinois. Another thing they should consider is broadcasting their games on the web. It is so much easier and doesn’t require a huge budget. Also they should allow recruiting. I know that recruiting is an evil word in high school but lets be honest, it happens all the time. Recruiting allows for competition to only get better and lets face it the students being recruited are only trying to prepare themselves for the next level. Why do you think the kids transferred to Milton every year. They wanted to play against the best competition and get noticed. The advantage that GISA schools have over GHSA schools is that not only will you be prepared through athletic competition but will be guaranteed a great education.

sem

September 18th, 2012
8:57 pm

I think it is a great move.The private schools branched off for a reason.Therefore play other private schools.As far as getting a better education I went to a public school and I work side by side with several people that went to private schools we are making the same amount and of money and I work for a large company in Ga.Education is what you make it,not where you get it from.

Bball Fan

September 18th, 2012
10:17 pm

Along with the GISA/GHSA decision, GHSA decided to play all of the basketball playoffs at the school with best record, up to the championship round. Hate that. Enjoyed going to Ft. Valley and seeing multiple games.

That Dude Says...

September 18th, 2012
11:42 pm

@ Yellow Jacket… BWHAAAAH HAAHAAH AAAHAAAAAAH SERIOUSLY????

Let the gisa do what ever they want they don’t matter. Recruit… what ever it doesn’t matter. The gisa hahaahaaaaaaah.

YellowJacket

September 19th, 2012
2:12 am

Yes dude. Well I can’t say this will be successful but it has worked in other states. You know what, I think it has worked in this state also. Thats why we now have this bush league also known as class A. You guys laughed when private schools joined GHSA. Soon as they started winning stocks in kleenex started to go up because of all the crying. GISA has the potential to be the better league in this state.

Mike

September 19th, 2012
4:24 am

Private schools recruit player from every where schools like darlington that has tons of money backing them bring in players to play . They should have a region for just private schools to play each other , B

Just a Fan

September 19th, 2012
10:30 am

Mike-perhaps you didnt read the actual statistics on athletic transfers that was recently published.The old unfounded rumor that private and city schools have an advantage was totaly disproven-public schools were the big offenders.Facts!not unsupported charges.

No district lines

September 19th, 2012
4:25 pm

@just a fan You are so right 6,000 transfers last year alone. Dekalb County has no line as long as you can get to the school you want to play for you are good to go. That leaves the Druid Hills, Lakesides, Clarkstons etc with a uphill fight in football. MLK has at least 15 transfers from other schools they just go get by say do you want to play for a winner? What is a kid to do his head swells and he just goes leaving his old team behind. The girls are transfering now in their sports it is out of hand.

guwinster

September 19th, 2012
4:48 pm

He’s just afraid that some of the GISA schools might start beating the GHSA schools.

mistermak

September 20th, 2012
8:00 am

It will happen as soon as the right pockets get lined!