VOTING DAY: What’s your plan for GHSA reclassification?

Cast your vote for Reclassification

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Let’s pretend we’ve appointed you to be on the GHSA’s Reclassification Committee. What’s your best plan? Do you like the existing system of five classifications with minor tweaks? Or do you want to go to something more radical, such as expanding to six classifications?

Then there is the idea of downsizing to 3-4 classifications with 6-8 state championships. Teams would play schools closer in proximity in the regular season and schools close in student enrollment during the playoffs (For example, if you had 100 teams in Class AAA, they would play each other in the regular season. At the start of the playoffs, the largest 50 schools would play for the Div. I championship while the others compete for the Div. II championship).

Or you may have a better plan? Please state your case below and back it with facts and opinions why it may work in Georgia.

Note: I don’t get to vote, but I’m really liking the 3-4 classification, with two state championships per class. It would renew some longtime rivalries during the regular season (i.e., generate more revenue).

73 comments Add your comment

Futbol4a

February 21st, 2011
7:09 pm

How about going old school? Go back to regional, sectional, state playoffs with one class for each sport. Whatever we do, I think we need to move back to geography being the first decider instead of size. Maybe splitting the state into regions and then dividing those regions by size. It will be interesting, that is sure.

Joshua Lawrence

February 21st, 2011
7:10 pm

As a basketball coach in the Atlanta area and a former basketball coach from NYC, I can tell you that the system that NYC has set up is far superior than any I have seen. Teams are classified in NYC based not on school size, but on competiveness of the specific sport. For example a school with an enrollment of 900 students can and will compete in the same classification of a school with 3200 students because both schools have agreed to play in the highest classification to play against the best competition available. These classification are decided by competitive level of the team over the past three years and are reassed every two years with teams moving up or dropping down.

I truly believe that schools should be classified different for each individual sport. Some schools have football athletes, some basketball and other both. Why not keep the same regional alignment, but seperate teams based on how competitive they are. A great example may be a school like Meadowcreek. They have a competitive basketaball team every year, but cannot win a football game against teams like Norcross, Brookwood, North Gwinnett etc… The talent pool is very different in that district.

GBM

February 21st, 2011
7:14 pm

At first glance I would say that 6 classifications would be the way to go. It does not however correct the biggest inequity in the current system and that is the rural A and AA schools having to compete with the uber private schools in metro Atlanta and other large population centers.

All you have to do is look at the Directors cup the last 2 years and you will see that a private school won in every classification except AAAAA where there are no private schools. Marist is playing up 2 classifications and has won the directors cup something like 7 years in a row. St. Pius and Woodward finished 1st and 2nd in AAA and they are the only private schools in AAA. So think about a Lincoln County or a Seminole County with 400 students competing against the Weslyans and Landmark Christians.

The GHSA must fix this for these schools to have any chance to compete. As it is now they have created pay and win system. Maybe with 6 classifications you could have a under 500 classification that would alleviate some of this.

Robert Lackey

February 21st, 2011
7:16 pm

Please don’t “sub-divide.” I’m from NC and that’s what they did. In my opinion it has really
cheapened the title of state champion, and it has prevented many potentially classic match-ups from ever occurring. Plus you’ve had numerous 2-8 type teams being forced into the playoffs, even though they were ready to end the season and certainly had no business being there. But more teams make the playoffs and more money goes to the Association, so that is probably what will happen here.

Musa

February 21st, 2011
8:02 pm

Six classifications. Count enrollment at private schools as 2.5 times actual numbers.
A = 500 and below
AAAAAA = 2500 and above

Divide the rest of the schools in the 4 remaining classes.

Unfair

February 21st, 2011
8:14 pm

The real problem exists with city schools like Buford and Carver that can attract alot of talent from a large population and remain in AA. Other city schools have similar advantages with a smaller population to get their players from like Calhoun, Dublin, etc. A school like Buford has “open enrollment” yet they decide who gets in and how many they accept. They are located in an area of about one million plus people. Their QB last year resided in Alpharetta but decided to attend school in Buford. I do not have a problem with open enrollment especially in such a large are, but why control the numbers to stay down. It needs to be called selective enrollment instead. Buford has produced more division I signees than basicaly all of real AA school’s south of Atlanta combines over teh last 15 years. Does not take a rocket scientist to figure this out. The final four in football consisted of three city schools with open enrollmentg and one private school. Caalhoun and Buford has met up for the finals the last three years. Not a coincidence. Yes they have good coaching staffs but they are no better than say the staff at Cook, Fitzgerald, Jefferson County, Elbert County, Brooks County, etc. I would like to see if the Buford staff would be as near as successful at Fitzgerald over the last 10 years that Robby Pruitt’s staff has been. They could not without the obvious advantages they have now with transfers and the ability to reload. Look back and see how Jess Simpson did at his other head coaching job before coming to Buford. There is no reason the GHSA should sit back and allow a school like Buford to manipulate the system they way they are doing it. Carver and Calhoun do the same thing to a lesser degree. This has been brought to the attention of GHSA by numerous people but Ralph S. continues to look the other way. He probably os getting a little kickback from Under Armour too.

Barry

February 21st, 2011
8:32 pm

Musa has the right idea: private schools are able to recruit and dominate. There needs to be an effort to enforce parity with public schools that have to work with what they’re given.

Tana

February 21st, 2011
8:34 pm

I think 6 classifications is best, if you get to keep the format that we are using now. I definitely don’t think that subdividing state championships is the way to go. Having 8 state champs takes a lot away from actually winning. There is already a ton of speculation as to who is really the best with 5 state champions. I wouldn’t mind dropping to four classifications, by combing A and AA. Again though, I would not like to have 8 champions. I think sectionals for all sports should be considered.

Wrestling just recently went to sectionals, and it allows the best of geographic locations to wrestle and set up a smaller bracket for the state tournaments. It has worked extremely well, as the best from the different geographic locations are guaranteed not to meet one another until the finals.

If there were to become 8 State Championships, I would like to see an extra 8-man bracket to decide a true Georgia State Champion in some sports. That would be cool.

Things that make you go hmmm.....

February 21st, 2011
8:40 pm

Go to 6 classifications. I’m near a small school (about 600 high school students) where there is talk about them moving up a class. They just got drilled all basketball season by the private Christian schools who go out and recruit. This school needs to remain at the smallest classification. If it takes 6 to accomplish, then so be it.

Tony

February 21st, 2011
8:43 pm

Enter your comments here

Rich

February 21st, 2011
8:55 pm

In addition, the issue of scholarships offered to players for private schools should be addressed. Our school doesn’t have the resources to offer scholarships and get beat by teams who do offer them. I think that there should be some type of limit for each sport played.

johnny too good

February 21st, 2011
9:02 pm

the 5 classes is fine, they just need to correct a few things, mainly the population numbers……… and school should not be allowed to “play up” or ‘down”; the sectionals might be worth a look too

http://www.youtube.co/thatsjohnanderson

Coach

February 21st, 2011
9:08 pm

The GHSA has to do something about schools that allow anyone to enroll (private schools, city schools.) The evidence is overwhelming against the fairness of a small rural school being in the same classification as a Buford or Wesleyan. Whatever happens, these schools must be forced to play up, at least in some sports.

johnny too good

February 21st, 2011
9:11 pm

not only that, they should do something about the number of teams in a region, example: region 3AAAAA has 11 teams, region 1AAAAA has 5 teams……. 3AAAA and 5AAAA both have 14 teams

http://www.youtube.com/thatsjohnanderson

Jeff

February 21st, 2011
9:14 pm

Until all schools are allowed to have “Open Enrollments” there will never be true equity in athletics. Those schools whose citys/counties restrict them by assigning zones, will rarely if ever be able to , on a consistent basis compete those “Private and/or those schools who are allowed to pull players in from all over the state.

Coach Overall

February 21st, 2011
9:40 pm

The idea of having 4 regions and each region divided up into division regardless to class this would alow for less travel and it would also allow for the so called good big schools will get a chance to the good little schools head to head. Then this will give each school an equal playing field if a school like Lincoln county would get a chance to match up against let say a school like baldwin county, or Wheeler would have to match up with schools like Whitefield Academy. With this scenario you would have 4 regions with those regions divided into divisions. The playoffs would look like this you would have division tournament with the winners playing each other for a chance to play in the the regional Final 4 for the ONE STATE Championship. If you decide to go to 6 Classifications it would be nice to have another playoff to decide the State Championship. Our go to 2 Divisions A and Div B with 2 champions with the winners playing each other to decide the state champ. Div A large schools to include Class 5A and 4A and Div B Class 3A, 2A, 1A.

Tdawg

February 21st, 2011
9:41 pm

GMB pretty much said it all. I like the 5 classification system best, but it does need some adjusting. It’s kind of funny that Swearington did not address the biggest concern as to why fans are complaining about the current set up. The teams in A and AA are at a big time disavantage to the city schools ie Buford and a few other city schools that control their numbers in order to stay in the smaller classifications and has a much larger population base to cherry pick as to whom they allow into their schools. If the state were to mandate open enrollment into these city schools then the problem would take care of inself. If these schools refuse to have open enrollment which they have a right to do, then they should be made to move up in classification.

Hotdog

February 21st, 2011
9:45 pm

I have NO faith in the GHSA! They have ruled that basketball cheerleaders who have been going on the court for 70 years during timeouts to lead cheers must now remain in the stands..how dumb is that? They have teams crisscrossing the state to play one game per site the opening night of the State basketball tournament rather than having the opening round at central locations…dumb, dumb, dumb! They couldn’t organize a one car motorcade.

Bright Idea

February 21st, 2011
9:47 pm

Start with some new faces on the reclassification committee and the entire executive committee for that matter. Many have been on there for years. Some new ideas and thoughts are needed but the GHSA has historically been a closed shop. Geography will have to be factored in without Swearingen’s selective enforcement of the isolation policy.

I ain't 'crutin..

February 21st, 2011
9:50 pm

And how many of Milton’s players “moved” into their school district?

And how many of Wesleyan’s players are on scholarship?

And just where is Buford’s school district?

glw

February 21st, 2011
9:52 pm

While private schools probably do have a slight advantage and some city schools like Buford have advantages too, not sure their is a way to completely fix that problem. maybe a multiplier (1.25) or similar would help that.

I am not sure going to six classification fixes the biggest problem . I think the biggest problem exist with balancing some regions. I must admit that AAAAA with the exception of having the Savannah schools in it is pretty fair. Sure the population disparity is large in some cases, but realistically it doesnt impact the quality of the overall class.

I would prefer it stay at 5 classes with a minimum enrollment of 2000. And the remaining schools placed into the other 4 classes. But those 4 classses would have 16 regions. This would eliminate some of the travel concerns that teams face who have to play full region schedules. It would allow most schools to schedule at least 3 or 4 non region games against close rivarly schools. For instance Region 6-AAAA played a full region schedule. That eliminated any chance of seeing Stephenson or MLK vs Sw Dekalb Mays vs Washington Marist vs St. Pius. etc. These games not only generate more interest but also increase gate receipts.

Goodman

February 21st, 2011
9:53 pm

The really needed reclassification is classifying the current GHSA Board members as RETIRED!

congaman

February 21st, 2011
9:55 pm

All hail the mighty and all knowing Jimmy Dorsey. As always with him, it’s all about football and nothing else. He has single handedly ran off very good coaches of other sports who were more successful than his precious football team was- just look back at cross country, basketball, or track to name a few. No reason that school hasn’t won more state titles in other sports!

yo

February 21st, 2011
10:01 pm

So with 6 classifications, who from Atlanta is going to be in the same region as Lowndes and Camden? By the way both Lowndes and Camden would
have to travel about 150 to 220 miles “every” week to play the teams in their region unless they have home games.

Legend of Len Barker

February 21st, 2011
10:01 pm

My previous post has seemingly gotten caught in the filter.

Early County is going to Laney this weekend. 220 miles and no direct route between the towns.

Once upon a time, schools were less than 2,000 kids. But at some point in history the entirety of the metro area seemed to thing that mega schools were the way to go. DeKalb County is closing Avondale. Avondale? Avondale! It’s a very solid Class AA school. Once upon a time, Atlanta had solid public school representation in most classes, from Roswell’s B to Brown’s AAA. I think the first blow was the closure of Sandy Springs. Then DeKalb started opening huge schools, such as Henderson.

Metro Atlanta created its own mess. They still have the shortest travel times and most resources and *they’re* complaining?

You made your bed. It’s unfair to rural Georgia. It’s even more unfair for anyone outside of the metro if you go to six classifications. If you want to fix the system, scale down your high schools.

Southern by the grace of God

February 21st, 2011
10:07 pm

I like six classifications, though I wouldn’t mind if some thought was given to make divisions according to geography in the postseason. Having teams travel 4-6 hours or more from one end of the state to the other seems to be a bit much like when Hillgrove of Cobb County had to travel over six hours to the extreme Southeastern part of the state on the Georgia Coast to face Camden County, Collins Hill and Grayson had to travel nearly five hours to play Lowndes and Valdosta, respectively, Valdosta had to travel 4-5 hours from extreme South Georgia to Cobb County to face McEachern in the state football playoffs and Colquitt County had to travel nearly five hours to face Grayson and Brookwood in the GA Dome in BACK-TO-BACK WEEKS! From the coaches and student-athletes having to miss a large of part of the school day because of really long travel times to a team’s support base being diminished in road games because of the cost and large chunk of time required, that kind of long-distant travel from one end of the state to the other is difficult on all parties involved. Plus deciding by a coin toss which end of the state where the games will be played when both teams have similar records or seeding is non-sensical. I understand that the rivalry between North Georgia and South Georgia and showing each other who’s best in the postseason is important in football, but there has got to be a better way to decide a champion in each region with the extreme travel time involved. Do you realize that the distance and travel time between Metro Atlanta and Valdosta and the Georgia Coast is identical to that of the distance between Los Angeles and the Bay Area in California? In CA, high school teams in the Bay Area and L.A. don’t play each other in the postseason and rarely play each other in the regular season because of the time and cost involved to travel that distance between the two extremes of the state. By no means is Georgia like California culturally, but geographically Georgia is the largest state East of the Mississippi River land-wise, which should seriously be taken into account when considering sites and locales for postseason play as it already is for regular season play.

T'VILLE DAWG

February 21st, 2011
10:09 pm

Whichever way they go it really just means that South Georgia is going to get screwed again.

Brett Favre was once a Falcon

February 21st, 2011
10:22 pm

Gas will be $5 per gallon within 2 years. Big buses get 12 miles to the gallon. In South Georgia, some region trips are 150 miles. One way. Most schools better have a very active booster club.

Truth

February 21st, 2011
10:25 pm

Calhoun is the master of recruiting in AA.25% of the kids who attend Calhoun High School dont live there. 90% of that 25% are athletes.

They have kids from Floyd.Gordon,Whitfield,Murray and Bartow counties.

No one else in 7aa has a chance.

I don't like the way it is now!

February 21st, 2011
10:27 pm

I wish the GHSA would outlaw the private schools from playing in the GHSA and make them play in the GISA with all of the other private schools in the state. We don’t owe Marist, Westminster, Wesleyan and the other private schools who have unlimited funds and resources the right to play sports against small traditional high schools who have 300 students but only a few good atheletes. It is amazing that my school which is a AAAA school has never had a basketball player who stood over 6′7″, but a small so-called Christian school with a student body of 250 from K through 12 have a starting frontline with the smallest being 6′8″ like I have seen SW Atlanta Christian in the past. They have had teams there in the past that could have beaten West Georgia or Valdosta State. Get rid of the private schools and have four classifications!!!

Coach

February 21st, 2011
10:34 pm

Six classifications really hurts individual sports like Wrestling. Realistically, whichever current option being discussed that the GHSA decides to adopt still does not solve the North GA vs. South GA problem in terms of travel come playoff time. Any plan they come up with needs to address both geography and size as well as trying to accommodate the different issues in each sport the GHSA sponsors. Granted this is quite the monumental task, but I think one universal solution is not the best path for the GHSA to take if serious changes are going to happen. Give a solution that accomodates the major sports that most schools participate in (Football, Basketball, Baseball, etc.) and allow the sports with more unique challenges (such as wrestling) to establish their own classifications as they deem best for competition. I know thats how its done at least in Pennsylvania. 6 or even 8 state champions in football doesnt seem too bad, but 6-8 individual state champions in 14 different weight classes in wrestling makes absolutely no sense.

Southern by the grace of God

February 21st, 2011
10:36 pm

Legend of Len Barker, February 21st, 2011,10:01 pm-

You think 2,000 students is big? You should see Long Beach Polytechnic HS in California with 4700+ students crammed into a campus that is little bigger than a square city block. Or, even better, see Ben Davis High School in Indianapolis, Indiana, a school with 4500 kids, a building that occupies over one-million square feet (which is more twice the size of the largest school building in Georgia) on a campus that is over 3/4 of a mile from end-to-end with its very own police force. Schools in large urban areas are gonna have larger populations and enrollments because of the overall surrounding higher population densities, that can’t be helped especially when the amount of land plots available to build schools and the amount of money to buy new land plots for schools is limited, even in areas as affluent as Cobb and Gwinnett, hence the larger schools. Telling schools in urban areas to “scale down their populations” is as impractical and unrealistic of a way to propose a solution to a problem as telling rural schools to “ramp-up their populations”. Which is why geography should be taken into account in restructuring the class system in the GHSA.

johnny too good

February 21st, 2011
10:45 pm

@yo………camden and bradwell can both join the lowndes/valdosta region and let the savannah schools drop down to AAA where they belong

or easy solution, divided the classifications based on geographic location, that would help minimize the travel expense

http://www.youtube.com/thatjohnanderson

johnny too good

February 21st, 2011
10:45 pm

GBM

February 21st, 2011
10:46 pm

@Musa – I like your idea 6 classifications and a multiplier for private schools. Probably should go back to 1.5 like it was prior to 2009.

Multiplier – There was a multiplier in place (famously called the Tom Murphy rule) 3 years ago but was dropped by the GHSA because of political pressure. The GHSA is going to be very reluctant to re institute this rule.

City Schools – City schools like private schools are also a problem. Schools like (Columbus, Cartersville, Gainesville, Carrollton, and Calhoun) definitely have an advantage. They can accept tuition based students outside of the City limits. In essence making them a quasi private school much like magnets or charters. I am not sure how to fix this. As new laws are enacted each year allowing more school choice for families this is only going to get worse. The GHSA is not going to touch this one.

Scholarships – I have seen many people mention this on this forum and others. Private schools are not giving athletic scholarships per SE. They are suppose to be need based. I said suppose to be. However under a new state law private schools are allowed to form scholarship funds that parents donate money to and then deduct a portion of the amount donated from their taxes. So thanks to our wonderful legislature private schools are now taking public school tax dollars and giving it to needy students (right). This new law is only going to make things worse in the lower classifications as there will be more money than ever for scholarships (athletes ) and greater disparity.

John

February 21st, 2011
10:58 pm

Any school system in Georgia–city or county–can accept any students it wants to take. City systems like Bremen, Calhoun, Carrollton, Rome and Dalton have tuition students because their academics far surpass the academics of the county systems aqround them. Tom Murphy once called he Bremen City School System “an oasis of learning in a sea of ignorance”–a description thyat is even truer now than it was 40 years ago. However, every school system is free to accept students from neighboring communities if it wants to do so.

Better idea!

February 21st, 2011
11:02 pm

Let’s get rid of all the sports and just focus on academics. With the shortage of money and teachers being furloughed and the school year being shortened it may be time to let the kids play at recreation departments or on AAU teams and the schools could get out of the sports business. That is the only way the playing field will ever be leveled and we could get away from the recruiting that goes on by the city schools like Carrollton, Calhoun, Buford, etc., and the private schools.

Chris

February 21st, 2011
11:03 pm

The solution to competitive balance isn’t going to more or less classifications. The solution is to crack down on the schools that are doing recruiting that is not legal and banning them from playoff competition for a couple of years. This goes for the public schools that we all know of and about 4 private schools that everyone in the state knows is cheating. Not every private school is doing things wrong and not every public school is doing things the right way.

GBM

February 21st, 2011
11:12 pm

@John – That is partly true. It is not very practical though in the rural parts of the state. Lets say you live in Wilkes County but want to go to Lincoln County high school. First there must be space available and at many of these small schools there is not. Second you are going to be driving an hour or more each way. Almost all of the City schools that are successful are located in large population centers where a student may actually live closer to a school in another district. Third I can tell you from experience that the school systems must have an agreement in place for this to happen. Fulton County schools got sued by Atlanta Public schools for admitting APS students. Fulton lost the case in State court because they did not have an agreement with APS. This case was decided in August of last year.

iTiSi

February 21st, 2011
11:17 pm

They mentioned looking at SC, NC, and TN setups. Trust me, as a former Georgian and now a Tennessean they do not, under any circumstances want to emulate TN. Every year it seems there is a big screwup or monumental problem up here that they didn’t plan for. Alabama and Mississippi would be better examples.

Fan

February 21st, 2011
11:21 pm

@I don’t like the way it is now…how do you explain that’s some schools like Marist are playing 2 classes above their level which should even the playing field.this was seen when they played chatahoochee in the state playoffs which has twice as many students.

Dale Willard

February 21st, 2011
11:24 pm

City schools are worse than private schools. Its basically the same thing in that its selective enrollment except city schools are MUCH cheaper. It costs about 2 to 3 thousand to go to Buford. It costs about 13 thousand to go to GAC and GAC is one of the cheaper private schools. All of you want to talk about the private schools dominating but in reality there are more private schools whose teams suck than there are whose teams are really good. Stop your whining. If your team is good they will win. If they are bad they will lose. Thats the bottom line no matter who youre playing.

yo

February 21st, 2011
11:29 pm

johnny to good…a classification of 2500 and bigger would only leave Lowndes and Camden in the south. The rest are all smaller except possibly Colquit, but I think them also. So you would have a classification made up of 2 south Ga. schools and metro Atlanta.

Fan

February 22nd, 2011
12:07 am

Dale hit it right on the head…I completely agree

Southern by the grace of God

February 22nd, 2011
12:37 am

The close to fairest solution that I could come up with would be for the GHSA to realign all schools in the state into conferences arranged by geography with no regard for class and make the playoffs all-inclusive, meaning that during the regular season, schools would play in conferences made up of all classes with their closest geographical neighbors with no worry of qualifying for the playoffs because the playoffs would be all-inclusive with champions being decided and crowned in each of six classes. In this system, the size of school and classification would only matter in the playoffs not in the regular season. This would mean that schools of dramatically different sizes enrollments might play in the same geographical conferences during the regular season, but would compete with other school of similar size and enrollment in an all-inclusive playoff. It should also be noted that smaller schools with similar enrollments and a similar academic and funding make-up, like small private schools, for example, could elect to play in the same conference granted they were relatively geographically close to each other. I readily admit that the all-class regular season and all-inclusive class playoff system isn’t the most desirable setup, but it’s probably the closest to fair that can be found in a state such as Georgia that is an ongoing tale of two of two states with sometimes dozens of new schools opening up yearly in an area with large schools on seemingly every block in Metro Atlanta and North Georgia and little, if any, yearly population change in an area with only a few large schools in South Georgia. One big positive with all-class, all-inclusive playoff system is that reclassification would only affect the playoff class you compete in, not the regular season conference, meaning that groups of teams could stay in a fixed geographical conference for as long as they like and not have to be reclassified into different regions every two years because of normal swings in enrollment, giving more schools the opportunity to build long-term rivalries amongst the same group of geographical neighbors instead of being switched off into a new and different group of foes every two years.

Radical

February 22nd, 2011
1:20 am

I don’t know why people are upset about kids going to private school, because a million kids have transfered from those private schools to go to other schools to win championships so no keep it the way it is. Just have city of atlanta schools play city of atlanta schools not these schools in the boonies that’s a pollution to the air

Radical

February 22nd, 2011
1:21 am

Should keep the classification, but have city of aps schools play aps schools if you are within 285 you should play teams withing 285

Legend of Len Barker

February 22nd, 2011
1:30 am

If you arranged by geography, you’d likely have Lowndes playing Atco in football. You really, really don’t want that.

You also have a major problem in Savannah. Only one or two schools qualify for AAAAA, but the rest are playing up, including Benedictine. Beach, Johnson, even Savannah High are really AAA or less. I have no idea what they’re thinking over there, but I’m sure Camden enjoys it. A lot.

The recruiting problem is getting worse and the GHSA has done nothing. They demand the coaches provide proof, instead of paying for their own investigations, but even proof doesn’t matter. Nor has it very often. We had proof in the 1980s that a neighboring county coveted a shooting guard. The principal testified. His mother testified. Nothing.

Only Bible Baptist has ever been penalized for recruiting as far as I’m aware, and they were given a slap on the wrist in 1985-86.

AstroFan

February 22nd, 2011
2:02 am

Savannah area schools play UP for basketball reason and track and field. Savannah area schools usually have somebody to rank high in basketball year in and year out. This year seems to be an exception. I do expect some schools to put together a decent football team at some point. I’m all for an APS classification, that will bring lots of talent back into the city, especially to my Astros over at Douglass. Boy we have been struggling a lot here lately. Our running back left for Stephenson, might know his name, Mike Davis….Yeah that’s him. That’s just a dream for an APS class by itself.

Panther Paw

February 22nd, 2011
7:40 am

AstroFan – The Savannah kid’s are being sold out by the school board. The Savannah school’s playing up has nothing to do with basketball or any other sport. The school’s haven’t been relevant in basketball in years…..the last championship was Savannah high(boys) in 1998 and the girls it was Beach in 2000. This has to do with the Savannah school board saving/making money playing themselves and Camden paying them to come to their stadium during the football season. The Savannah school’s should be playing in 3-AAA.