Cam Bedrosian, son of 1987 Cy Young winner, celebrates first-round MLB selection at Waffle House

Cameron Bedrosian, at 6-foot-1, is not an imposing physical specimen. Sitting at a table, where only his upper body is visible, he looks like your basic good-looking, hazel-eyed teenager who might play a mean Ultimate Frisbee.

Only when he rises and strides to the indoor mound for a 10-minute side session, does one notice the thighs. Without question this is a pitcher’s lower body, with thighs and posterior bearing an absolute fidelity to a Seaver or Clemens-style classicism.

Cameron is the youngest of Steve Bedrosian’s four sons. The previous three played baseball, and one played college. But early on, Cameron’s dad noticed something was a different about the baby. “You can build the body, make it stronger, make it flexible,” Steve said. “You can teach good mechanics. But you can’t teach arm speed. I knew when he was about 10 or 11 that he had that special arm, that special talent.
“From that time,” he added, “we’ve basically been preparing for this day.”
He said this Friday. On Monday night at roughly 9:45, baseball commissioner Bud Selig announced the East Coweta High right-hander was chosen in the first round by the Los Angeles Angels, the 29th player taken in the 2010 First-Year Player Draft.
An hour later Cameron, his three brothers, sister, mother, father and two school buddies drove to the Senoia Waffle House.
“I love having breakfast at nighttime,” the first-rounder said Tuesday afternoon. “I had grits, eggs and toast and rolled them up into one sandwich.”
If scouts question young Bedrosian’s size, they certainly marvel at all his side dishes. He can hit 96 mph with a four-seam fastball that basically detonates when it smacks the catcher’s mitt. But he actually gets more movement with a two-seamer that tails down and in to righties, while reaching the low 90s. His slider dives kamikaze-like at roughly 12 to 8, while he’s recently developed a fledgling circle change.
But what scouts may like most are his bloodlines. Steve Bedrosian broke in with the Braves 29 years ago this summer and played 14 big-league seasons. He made 732 appearances and had 184 career saves and a lifetime 3.38 ERA. Closing for the Phillies in 1987, he became one of only nine relief pitchers to win the Cy Young Award. Only three have done it si-nce.
“Bedrock” (as he was known) was drafted 53rd (third round) in 1978, five picks behind Cal Ripken Jr. But when asked to compare himself to his son, he shakes his head and says, “There is no comparison. It’s not even close. He’s way beyond where I was at his age.”
Scouts began to flock to Cameron’s games as early as ninth grade, but the intensity revved up last summer. By now 29 teams (all except Baltimore) have both seen him play and personally interviewed him.
Scouts quickly discovered that father constructed the son’s pitching regimen along the two main organizing principles of restraint and versatility. Cameron does not, and never has, played all year, and in fact doesn’t throw at all from September through December. Though Cameron once threw 107 pitches, he mostly never goes over 80 in a game and during early-season contests barely clears 50.
This past season he went 8-1 for East Coweta, pitching 58 1/3 innings, allowing 22 hits, 27 walks, while striking out 111 with a 1.44 ERA. For the past several years, after starting for his school team, he transitions into a closer for the Home Plate Chili Dogs, his travel team based out of Peachtree City. There he pitches another 25 to 30 innings a summer, which comes to about three or four innings per weekend. In short, the baby Bedrosian has never pitched 100 innings during any 12-month duration.
“I don’t know what the Angels plans for me are,” Cameron said Tuesday. “I can go either way. I love the studying and the preparation that goes into starting. But I also love the pure adrenaline rush of closing.”
Bedrosian will fly to Anaheim next week to meet team officials and tour Angel Stadium. Sometime after that — he doesn’t have a timetable — he’ll decide whether to sign or accept a full scholarship to LSU.
One thing for sure, there’s nothing as variable and even precipitous than the road from rookie to major leagues. No one knows this better than Braves President John Schuerholz, who took his first scouting job in 1966, and ran his first draft in 1975. “No team,” he said, “ever drafts a kid strictly to stock their minor-league roster. Every kid you draft you have to believe has some chance of making it to the majors.
“Having said that,” he added, “out of 50 rounds, if you get two guys who make an impact on your major-league team, who play regularly, then you’ve had a hell of a draft.”
Bedrosian’s first-round status is no guarantee either. A recent Sports Illustrated article points out that “Of the top 30 picks each year from 2000 to ‘05, 31 percent have never reached the big leagues [55 of 180].”
“That’s one thing about having a dad who was a big-leaguer,” Bedrosian said. “He’s prepared me for what this will be like. Yes, I was pretty good high school pitcher. But now I go down and start all over, start from scratch. And really, to be honest, I’m pretty excited about it.”

Only when he rises and strides to the indoor mound for a 10-minute side session, does one notice the thighs. Without question this is a pitcher’s lower body, with thighs and posterior bearing an absolute fidelity to a Seaver or Clemens-style classicism.

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Cameron is the youngest of Steve Bedrosian’s four sons. The previous three played baseball, and one played college. But early on, Cameron’s dad noticed something was a different about the baby. “You can build the body, make it stronger, make it flexible,” Steve said. “You can teach good mechanics. But you can’t teach arm speed. I knew when he was about 10 or 11 that he had that special arm, that special talent.

“From that time,” he added, “we’ve basically been preparing for this day.”

He said this Friday. On Monday night at roughly 9:45, baseball commissioner Bud Selig announced the East Coweta High right-hander was chosen in the first round by the Los Angeles Angels, the 29th player taken in the 2010 First-Year Player Draft.

An hour later Cameron, his three brothers, sister, mother, father and two school buddies drove to the Senoia Waffle House.

“I love having breakfast at nighttime,” the first-rounder said Tuesday afternoon. “I had grits, eggs and toast and rolled them up into one sandwich.”

If scouts question young Bedrosian’s size, they certainly marvel at all his side dishes. He can hit 96 mph with a four-seam fastball that basically detonates when it smacks the catcher’s mitt. But he actually gets more movement with a two-seamer that tails down and in to righties, while reaching the low 90s. His slider dives kamikaze-like at roughly 12 to 8, while he’s recently developed a fledgling circle change.

But what scouts may like most are his bloodlines. Steve Bedrosian broke in with the Braves 29 years ago this summer and played 14 big-league seasons. He made 732 appearances and had 184 career saves and a lifetime 3.38 ERA. Closing for the Phillies in 1987, he became one of only nine relief pitchers to win the Cy Young Award. Only three have done it since.

“Bedrock” (as he was known) was drafted 53rd (third round) in 1978, five picks behind Cal Ripken Jr. But when asked to compare himself to his son, he shakes his head and says, “There is no comparison. It’s not even close. He’s way beyond where I was at his age.”

1987 Cy Young Award winner Steve Bedrosian (bottom row, left) and youngest son Cam (white shirt), No. 29 overall pick by the LA Angels (ECbaseball.com)

1987 Cy Young Award winner Steve Bedrosian (bottom row, left) and youngest son Cam (white shirt), No. 29 overall pick by the LA Angels (ECbaseball.com)

Scouts began to flock to Cameron’s games as early as ninth grade, but the intensity revved up last summer. By now 29 teams (all except Baltimore) have both seen him play and personally interviewed him.

Scouts quickly discovered that father constructed the son’s pitching regimen along the two main organizing principles of restraint and versatility. Cameron does not, and never has, played all year, and in fact doesn’t throw at all from September through December. Though Cameron once threw 107 pitches, he mostly never goes over 80 in a game and during early-season contests barely clears 50.

This past season he went 8-1 for East Coweta, pitching 58  innings, allowing 22 hits, 27 walks, while striking out 111 with a 1.44 ERA. For the past several years, after starting for his school team, he transitions into a closer for the Home Plate Chili Dogs, his travel team based out of Peachtree City. There he pitches another 25 to 30 innings a summer, which comes to about three or four innings per weekend. In short, the baby Bedrosian has never pitched 100 innings during any 12-month duration.

“I don’t know what the Angels plans for me are,” Cameron said Tuesday. “I can go either way. I love the studying and the preparation that goes into starting. But I also love the pure adrenaline rush of closing.”

Bedrosian will fly to Anaheim next week to meet team officials and tour Angel Stadium. Sometime after that — he doesn’t have a timetable — he’ll decide whether to sign or accept a full scholarship to LSU.

Bedrosian.JPG

One thing for sure, there’s nothing as variable and even precipitous than the road from rookie to major leagues. No one knows this better than Braves President John Schuerholz, who took his first scouting job in 1966, and ran his first draft in 1975. “No team,” he said, “ever drafts a kid strictly to stock their minor-league roster. Every kid you draft you have to believe has some chance of making it to the majors.

“Having said that,” he added, “out of 50 rounds, if you get two guys who make an impact on your major-league team, who play regularly, then you’ve had a hell of a draft.”

Bedrosian’s first-round status is no guarantee either. A recent Sports Illustrated article points out that “Of the top 30 picks each year from 2000 to 2005, 31 percent have never reached the big leagues [55 of 180].”

“That’s one thing about having a dad who was a big-leaguer,” Bedrosian said. “He’s prepared me for what this will be like. Yes, I was pretty good high school pitcher. But now I go down and start all over, start from scratch. And really, to be honest, I’m pretty excited about it.”

By Bill Banks — Special for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution

4 comments Add your comment

Georgia Bred

June 10th, 2010
4:37 am

Only when he rises and strides to the indoor mound for a 10-minute side session…. appears twice.

Congrats

June 12th, 2010
9:36 pm

But does he throw that 12 to 8 slider left handed?

Patrick

June 27th, 2011
12:15 am

I faced him and he’s good. Very good

Walter Dunbar

January 27th, 2012
11:39 pm

No, he throws the 12 to 8 right handed. Currently is recovering from Tommy John surgery. Due back this year.