The mute button comes off the college coaches on signing day

All year long, we’ve had to go by what the high school prospects and their respective coaches have had to say about recruiting. Their side of the story, their version of events.

On Wednesday, the college coaches finally have permission to speak and put their spin on everything.

NCAA rules prevent colleges from commenting on prospective student-athletes. That ends on Wednesday, as soon as the prospects sign off on the scholarship papers.

In Columbia, S.C., what will Steve Spurrier have to say about how the situation was handled with Tucker’s Jonathan Davis? Will he even address it? Or just “let it go” and talk about the prospects they did get? Members of the South Carolina media have promised to ask Spurrier about Davis, therefore stay tuned.

At Georgia Tech, Paul Johnson appeared to take a “hard-line” stance toward Georgia Tech commitments visiting other schools. Quarterback Dontae Aycock of Tampa, Fla., was a “secret commitment” to Tech three weeks ago and warned against taking an official visit to Auburn, but did anyways and had his scholarship yanked by Tech, this according to Aycock’s high school coach. Is this the beginning of a new policy by Johnson? Was that a message to all future Tech recruits … “You’ve got our word, we want yours”?

4 comments Add your comment

Paddy

February 5th, 2009
6:34 pm

I shook your hand you shook mine. Thats how is used to be and how it should be now. Do you think Alvin York would have gotten on that plane to Auburn? I do not think so.

Ocilla General

February 5th, 2009
2:08 pm

Funny how Aycock considered Auburn and got his offer pulled, while Stephen Hill flat out said “I may sign with Georgia” and kept his. I guess everybody at Tech gets treated equally, but some get treated more equally than others.

ACC Fan

February 4th, 2009
8:42 am

Obviously SEC Fan, like many of his conference brethren, struggles with reading comprehension. Offers from Tech aren’t “take or leave it,” but rather “don’t take it unless you mean it.” Coach Johnson actually encourages recruits to visit as many schools as they want and to gather as much information as they can about prospective schools, even after they visit Tech. He just doesn’t want them to accept an offer unless they are absolutely sure of where they want to go. Aycock knew this going in, but still made a commitment to Johnson and Tech. If Aycock had interest in Auburn or any other school, he should not have committed to Tech.

I, for one, find this approach refreshing and think that if more coaches adopted it, the current muddy world of commitments, soft verbals, contingency offers, etc. would be radically changed. This not only benefits the schools and coaches as they plan how to use their limited number of scholarships, but also the prospective student-athletes as it simplifies the whole process.
I, for one, find this approach refreshing and think that if more coaches adopted it, the current muddy world of commitments, soft verbals, contingency offers, etc. would be radically changed. This not only benefits the schools and coaches as they plan how to use their limited number of scholarships, but also the prospective student-athletes as it simplifies the whole process.

SEC fan

February 4th, 2009
6:04 am

No problem with Johnson’s approach. Recruits just have to remember to make Tech their 5th visit. Otherwise, if it is their first visit and they get an offer, it is take it or leave it with no other visits allowed. Not a problem if the recruit knows Tech is where he wants to be. However if he wants to visit any other schools before deciding, he better do it before going to Tech. Hard ball and fair goes both ways!