accessAtlanta

City & State or ZIP Tonight, this weekend, May 5th...
City & State or ZIP
City & State or ZIP Tonight, this weekend, May 5th...
City & State or ZIP

What diet are you on this week?

Customer 1: “Are your vegetables cooked in butter?”

Server: “No, they are cooked in oil.”

Customer 1: “What kind of oil?”

Server: “Chef uses canola oil, it adds a neutral taste.”

Customer 1: “Oh. Well what about the Greek chicken salad. Is there a way to order it without the chicken, no feta cheese, and dressing on the side?”

Server: “We can do that. And for you?”

Customer 2: “On the bacon hamburger- is it free-range beef? And can I get extra bacon, only if it’s local.”

Ever been in a situation with an ordering conundrum like this? Whether you were with a dining companion, or you were the server with an order tablet that looked like a short novel, popular diets have been driving diners to change their eating habits. While some diets, like gluten-free, are for genuine health issues such as celiac disease, others like the paleo or raw foods diet are based on the trends of the moment.

“Our restaurant is conscious of what people are doing this week,” said Mitchell Anderson, owner of MetroFresh, a fast-casual restaurant known for accommodating special diets. He believes there is a segment of people that go from fad diet to fad diet.  ”It’s a blessing and curse, and we have to consider what will sell to the most people. We can’t narrow dietary restrictions to five people.”

“You know that the diet has become a trend when restaurants start putting it on menus,” said Chris Rosenbloom, a dietician at Georgia State University. “More people are looking for it, so it is a customer demand. But restaurants should really make sure if they list menu items, the claims are legitimate.”

Rosenbloom suggests that restaurants work with a dietician to address specific allergies, specifically gluten-free because celiac disease is a threatening condition.

What is your take on the diet trends of today? Have you had success (or failure) with adhering to them in the restaurant scene?

-By Alexa Lampasona for the Food & More blog

15 comments Add your comment

Gilroy Cream

May 12th, 2014
10:24 am

The gluten free fad is showing a lot of peoples’ cards. I have no issue with those who legitimately have celiac disease but every generic bottle blond in this city has picked up gluten free as the next “in” thing for food without any idea why they are doing it other than one of the other housewives told them it was good.

Food trends come and go and Atlanta is famous for jumping on trends late and then doing them to death. I just wish more would focus on the food instead of trying to be trendy. I mean, we are in the south and there isn’t one decent BBQ place around.

Muffin

May 12th, 2014
3:16 pm

I believe his name is Mitchell Anderson, not Michael.

Galt

May 12th, 2014
3:59 pm

True dat, Gilroy. BBQ here blows.

Alexa Lampasona

May 12th, 2014
5:08 pm

Oops! Nice catch Muffin!

Diet | Zeal for Life Wellness Drink

May 12th, 2014
10:24 pm

[...] What diet are you on this week? | Food and More with John … http://blogs.ajc.com/food-and-more/“You know that the diet has become a trend when restaurants start putting it on menus,” said Chris Rosenbloom, a dietician at Georgia State University. “More people are looking for it, so it is a customer demand. [...]

Marsh

May 13th, 2014
7:50 am

I have no patience for attention seekers…I mean “gluten sensitive” people.

The BBQ here does suck. Don’t tell me Fox Bros, because no. I moved to N GA and STILL can’t find any decent BBQ. It’s a travesty.

Daisy

May 13th, 2014
10:15 am

So, I’m one of the “attention seekers” who requires gluten free food. Yes, I have celiac. Trust me, I’d get more attention if I ate gluten and barfed in the middle of the restaurant. Not sure how it bothers anyone else for me to be gluten free. I do my research beforehand, and if the restaurant does not have options, I either don’t go or don’t eat. But I don’t make a huge fuss in the restaurant. For example, went to Pricci last night, they had a gluten free menu with lots of options and everything was delicious. No one at my table except the person next to me who heard me ask for the gluten free menu even knew I was ordering from it.

Kar

May 13th, 2014
10:17 am

Honestly? The DASH diet keeps getting singled out year after year as the healthiest, best mix of nutrients and easiest to maintain to keep the weight off.

And some people truly do have gluten issues, such as celiac disease.

Baltisraul.....

May 13th, 2014
11:52 am

Since I know nothing about celiac disease, I have questions. Is this disease very old and would date back to say, grandparents aged people. When was gluten free diets discovered to help with celiac. Is a large part of the population now suffering from this disease? It is promoted on food packaging as this could be pandemic.

Daisy

May 13th, 2014
12:25 pm

Celiac has existed for a long time, but is only recently being diagnosed properly for the majority of sufferers. I went 15 years with various health problems before I got a correct diagnosis. Going gluten free has cleared everything up(vertigo, IBS, constant stomachache, hives, vomiting, persistent anemia, low vitamin D levels, to name a few). I have a family history of colon and intestinal cancer, which is what results if you leave celiac untreated. So probably those relatives had it, too, but were never diagnosed and suffered as a result. There is also non-celiac gluten sensitivity, which some now think is a precursor to celiac. Go to http://www.cureceliacdisease.org for more info from the Univ. of Chicago Celiac Disease Center.

Marie

May 13th, 2014
1:34 pm

Thank you for using the phrase “genuine health issues such as celiac disease.” I rarely eat out because few restuarants have the training or staff to cope with cross contamination, which as you can imagine, is a bit isolating. It can be difficult to find a “gluten-free menu” that is actually meant for people with celiac disease (or at least a restuarant with staff who can properly execute such a meal without risking the health of their customer). (I’ve had luck at Flemings and Capital Grille in Atlanta; Posana Cafe in Asheville and Senza in Chicago are delicious, naturally gluten free restaurants [a concept I'd love to see in Atlanta].)

I greatly appreciate the fact that you took the time to note that the need for gluten free options is because of a genuine disease, regardless of the diets popularity.

Thanks for not simply dismissing this frustrating and often painful disease as a fad, whether or not “bottle blonds” have co-opted the diet.

Sergio

May 13th, 2014
1:36 pm

None – I have self-control.

Baltisraul.....

May 13th, 2014
3:32 pm

Daisy, Thanks, that was very helpful.

Fred ™

May 14th, 2014
9:38 am

If you can’t find good BBQ in Atlanta, you have no taste. Go back up north or to texas or where ever your snobby ass is from.

Fred ™

May 14th, 2014
9:38 am

Now good Cajun food on the other hand……. heck AUTHENTIC Cajun food……….