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Passover Dining Specials

chocolate covered matzoh

chocolate covered matzah

Passover begins tonight at sundown, and for those observing, the holiday entails one week of keeping kosher. The first thing to go is chametz, but don’t let that stop you from dining out. Some Atlanta restaurants have curated special menus for this celebration.

For a quick lunch:

MetroFresh is known for their rotating soups, and this week they are serving up a Guinness and brisket soup.

**This is not Kosher, however they are simply serving it during Passover. **

For one night only:

Tonight Ecco created a family style four-course prix fixe dinner for $40 per person that includes European-style saffron matzo ball soup. The General Muir’s second night Sedar Passover dinner takes place Tuesday, and they may still have a few reservations left.

For dinner:

Rosa Mexicana does an annual Mexican Passover menu that will run from now to the 22nd. The four-course prix fixe is $42 per person. The special Gefilte fish will make an appearance on Lure ‘s menu from now until April 22.

For your sweet tooth:

Alon’s makes a special raspberry vanilla mousse with almond cake and fresh berries that was requested so often they added it to the menu year-round. A pop-up for the holiday: their chocolate-covered matzah.

For a crowd:

Sprinkles Cupcakes is selling a dozen flourless chocolate cupcakes adorned with the Star of David for only today and tomorrow. Or check out Buckhead Bread Company’s menu for take-home Passover specialties, available until the 22nd.

-By Alexa Lampasona for the Food & More blog

17 comments Add your comment

Jill

April 14th, 2014
2:51 pm

Guinness (along with all beer) is made with hops, and is therefore not kosher for Passover. Too bad, since it sounds delicious.

Ned Ludd

April 14th, 2014
4:55 pm

Interesting–have always been told Guinness (and most unflavored beers) were Kosher. Certainly not an expert on the subject. Would love a comment from someone who is.

Sofiya

April 15th, 2014
4:41 am

Kosher and Kosher for Passover are 2 different things. There are specific regulations that are related to Passover and depending on both how strict one follows the Passover regulations and the type of Jew nationality a person is whether they are Sephardic or Ashkanazi .

Robert

April 15th, 2014
6:21 am

No, beer is definitely mot kosher for Passover no matter what type of Jew you are (Ashkenazi, Sephardi, etc). But, let’s be realistic – none of the food at these places is actually kosher anyway (under supervision, no mixing meat/milk, etc), so, anyone who’s willing to go out to these restaurants in the first place probably doesn’t care that much, and just enjoys doing something in the “spirit” of Passover. (Except the beer, since that’s made with wheat, and there’s really no getting around that one if you’re trying to observe Passover.)

Baltisraul....

April 15th, 2014
7:29 am

Robert, could they not drink Budweiser? It is made with rice not wheat.

kmbraunstein

April 15th, 2014
10:07 am

@Blatisraul:
Definitely not if one is Ashkenazi, who do not eat rice on passover. Sephardic eat rice. One is generally prohibited from eating anything made with yeast, although wine is permitted. I don’t know about Chinese Jews (yes there are Chinese Jews). The other issue is that the pots, pans, and knives, forks. dishes all have to be kosher for passover otherwise it is not a true sedar. It is very expensive for a restaurant to do a true kosher sedar.

kmbraunstein

April 15th, 2014
10:09 am

@Blatisraul:
A LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT

Dear Customers;

Firstly let me say, I want to thank everyone for their patience.

Did you know that Ramapo Valley Brewery is the only Kosher brewery in the United States and the only brewery certified Kosher for Passover.

All of our beers have been Kosher certified by Rabbi Zushe Vosef Blech, 30 Mariner Way, Monsey, NY. Tel: 845-364-5381 All bottles carry our Kosher Certification

kmbraunstein

April 15th, 2014
10:24 am

@Robert
A restaurant can be kosher without being certified or supervised by a Rabbinic organization. It just can’t hold itself as being kosher to the public. The certification and supervision is more of a legal issue than religious. If you follow the rules, you are kosher. If you claim to the public that you are kosher, then you need to be certified. Many restaurants/bakeries that are certified to be kosher will sell the business to their employees on Friday and Saturday to stay open and repurchase the restaurant/bakery on Sunday to be “Kosher”. The food is and the preparation is the same and is kosher by all religious laws but two. It fails to be “Kosher” because it was made on the Sabbath and money was exchanged.

Alexa Lampasona

April 15th, 2014
11:25 am

We were told the Guinnesss soup was Kosher by the restaurant. We are looking into it and will let you know.

Alexa Lampasona

April 15th, 2014
12:40 pm

The soup is not Kosher. It is just something MetroFresh is serving for Passover.

Baltisraul....

April 15th, 2014
12:55 pm

Great information today. Very interesting to learn what maybe I should have paid more attention to earlier in my life.

Ned Ludd

April 15th, 2014
1:28 pm

God Bless America and the freedom to enjoy so many religious and cultural diversities and share and learn from them. A Blessed Passover to all my Jewish friends. I am always touched by two Jewish friends of the family in the medical profession who volunteer to work Christmas so others may take time with their families.

Robert

April 15th, 2014
10:02 pm

@kmbraunstein –

I know the procedures well. (By they way, Georgia has a law on the books that to call yourself a kosher restaurant you have to be certified.)

What I’m saying is, even if a dish for Passover has no prohibited ingredients, if it’s cooked in the same kitchen as prohibited ingredients, on the same plates, using the same utensils, it’s not kosher. And, while places like The General Muir did a seder dinner, it’s not a kosher dinner – they use dairy and meat in the same dishes. So, yes, while they have “Passover specials” – they are not kosher nor kosher for Passover. But, the people to whom that matters wouldn’t be going to those restaurants anyway.

kmbraunstein

April 16th, 2014
10:35 am

@ Robert

I agree with what you say with the exception that I know of vegetarian restaurants that people who keep kosher all the time will go and eat at despite the lack of certification. Even Kosher Rabbis frequent them. So they are deemed to be kosher by their patrons even though they do not claim to the public to be kosher. My point to you is that certification is not a religious requirement but a legal requirement: “none of the food at these places is actually kosher anyway (under supervision, no mixing meat/milk, etc),” Leviticus does not mention having to have an 0U or K or a letter from a rabbinic organization to be kosher. The certification of food to be kosher has gotten a bit out of hand.
Items that are inherently kosher are being certified as kosher by rabbis here in Georgia who are charging $1500 to artisian suppliers in order to write a statement that they are kosher: i.e., unprocessed honey, unprocessed milk, unprocessed salt, flour, etc. Obviously, processed foods are a different issue where ingredients matter, but raw foods that are not processed should not have to be certified to be kosher unless one does not trust their supplier. The high cost of certification has limited the availability of high quality artisian foods as well as restaurants to religious Jews in Georgia. Remember Royal Bagels’ story. Even in NYC the number of certified kosher delis is declining.

[...] Atlanta restaurant options and specials for Passover [...]

Ann

April 17th, 2014
4:25 pm

Alexa, you may want to correct the spelling in the article. It’s “seder”,

keepinkosher

April 20th, 2014
12:48 pm

@kmbraunstein: “even Kosher Rabbis frequent them” …

If you are so knowledgeable as you claim, then you should also know that these “Kosher” rabbis most likely are not Orthodox rabbis. I can pretty much guarantee that you won’t see any Rabbi from Chabad, Beth Jacob, Ariel, etc eating at any of the so-called “Kosher for Passover” restaurants.. there is a clear difference between Kosher-stye and Kosher for Passover.

Sorry, but Robert is right. If you want legitimate Kosher for Passover food, and not Kosher style for Passover food, then you are more than welcome to get catered food from Goodfriend’s, Costco, or some other places around Atlanta. However, the restaurants mentioned in the post ARE NOT KOSHER FOR PASSOVER.

Also, regarding your comment about eating “vegetarian out”- I know of some Conservative Rabbis that do that, but no Orthodox ones…and either way, none of them do that during Passover.