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Domino’s adds gluten-free pizza crust

Domino's GF crustIt was only last month that I called all the local pizza places with delivery to find just one offering gluten-free crust. We were organizing a pizza party for a Girl Scout event and had one gluten-free family. My calls were met with confusion, “Gluten what?” Domino’s Pizza was one of the places I called.

It seems that I was just a few weeks too early. Last week, Domino’s announced that it now offers gluten-free crusts. They contain no wheat, rye or barley. Instead, the ingredients include rice flour, rice starch, potato starch and olive oil.

While we have some wonderful independent pizza places making gluten-free crusts in Atlanta, Domino’s is the first large-scale pizza chain to offer them. This signals the recognition of the trend towards gluten-free products for those with Celiac disease or gluten-sensitivity. Domino’s, however, introduces its gluten-free crust with a disclaimer: it is not recommended for individuals with Celiac disease.

The new crusts are made in the same kitchen as traditional wheat-flour based crusts, which introduces the possibility for cross contamination. According to its website, Domino’s conducted third party studies on cross contamination. They found the risk to be minimal, but cannot guarantee that it won’t occur.

The ad campaign for the new crusts includes the line, “A gluten-free crust that doesn’t taste like the box it comes in.” Has anyone tried it? Do you agree?

See the Domino’s Pizza website for additional information about the gluten-free crust.

–by Jenny Turknett, Food and More blog

33 comments Add your comment

[...] Domino’s adds gluten-free pizza crust – Atlanta Journal Constitution (blog) [...]

Daisy

May 16th, 2012
4:08 pm

The consensus from the gluten-free community (those of us who must avoid it for medical reasons) is that Domino’s offering is NOT safe for those with celiac or gluten sensitivity. They are using the same utensils and toppings on both regular and gluten-free crusts, which means cross-contamination is likely. The same ladle and sauce that just touched a wheat crust will also be used on the gluten-free crust. This would be enough to send my extremely sensitive stomach into agony. So, I will be sticking with local places like Blue Moon that take cross-contamination seriously.

Judge Smails

May 16th, 2012
4:26 pm

What’s the deal with all of these allergies. I’m pretty sure they didn’t exist when I was a kid (60s). Have we produced a generation of gastrological wimps? I was visiting a reather large group of friends I have known since grade school (Oak Grove in DeKalb), and not one of us could remember anyone in our class being allergic to any food…bees stings, yes, but no food allergies.

I blame it on Dr Spock and his ilk.

Judge Smails

May 16th, 2012
4:26 pm

**Gastronomical**

Maria S.

May 16th, 2012
4:28 pm

@ Daisy – I agree completely. Those of us with Celiac disease are highly sensitive to cross-contamination. I’ve had great luck with my local Mellow Mushroom pizza in Midtown. Not only do they deliver – to a limited area, but thankfully I’m within it – but if you specify you have a gluten allergy or Celiac, they prepare the pizza in a separate area, with separate utensils to avoid cross-contamination. If you don’t specify an allergy, though, they’ll just prepare it in the same place with the other pizzas.

JS

May 16th, 2012
4:54 pm

Mellow Mushroom also offers gluten free options and as far as I am aware they are very good about cross contamination guidelines.

muffin

May 16th, 2012
5:26 pm

Judge Smails, don’t you think it’s possible that when we were growing up there were kids who were in agony after eating gluten but no one could figure out why until they were adults? I spent my entire childhood in agony after almost every meal due to IBS but no one knew what it was until i was in my 20’s. The Celiac Disease Foundation was even started until 1990. So no, i don’t think the problem is that kids are gastronomical wimps these days. How many kids were even in your class at Oak Grove anyway? i went to a local DeKalb school and we had maybe 15/20 kids, tops in each classroom.

[...] Domino’s adds gluten-free pizza crust [...]

Sophie

May 16th, 2012
7:46 pm

Why even have the gluten free pizza if people with celiac can not eat it? What’s the point?

Pat

May 16th, 2012
8:00 pm

I have found a yummy chocolate that is also gluten free at http://www.eatingchocolates.com

Gwinnett Mom

May 16th, 2012
8:10 pm

You hippys are ruinin all the good food with your vegan lifestyle. If U dont like meet than stay at home U unamerican loosers

NewCrustDaily

May 16th, 2012
9:12 pm

I thought that Pizza Hut was the company that introduced a new crust every week.

Good job Dominos. Now if you would just offer a few additional vegetable toppings and figure out why your artisan pizzas taste great in one restaurant and crappy in another you might be headed in the right direction.

NewCrustDaily

May 16th, 2012
9:16 pm

Wow, seems like Gwinnett Mom really has a giant pizza oven stuck up her a**. What’s the problem? Don’t buy the gluten free. Cover you pizza with meat. Learn how to spell.

And just what is un-american about being a vegetarian. Must have missed that in the Constitution, Declaration of Independence, Articles of Confederation, etc. I would imagine most vegetarians eat produce grown on american farms by american farmers.

Maybe you need to reduce your meat consumption. I think all the growth hormones, testosterone, antibiotics and other animals they were fed may have cause a serious mental problem in you. Maybe Mad Cow disease.

NewCrustDaily

May 16th, 2012
9:19 pm

Really if you have celiac disease, you should consider a raw vegan approach to eating. There is a ton of great pieces I have seen from folks with a variety of gastrointestinal disorders including celiac that have benefitted tremendously from this fundamental change of diet. Western medicine is definitely not the right way to go about getting healthy. They are in it for the disease and the continuity of the problems. Health is not something western medicine is about.

Jenny Turknett

May 17th, 2012
7:51 am

Daisy, it really depends on your level of sensitivity. I don’t think it can be written off for everyone in the gluten-free community (although certainly for those with Celiac). We have gluten-sensitive family members who would not be as adversely affected by cross contamination and would tolerate this pizza just fine. This is also great news for the GF community because it indicates that the GF needs are being recognized and not written off as a trend or fad diet.

GF

May 17th, 2012
1:44 pm

I am sick of these bunch of whimps, “lactose intolerant” “gluten intolerant” “peanut intolerant”, just stay home, eat carrots, and leave the rest of us alone.

Jennifer D. Harris

May 17th, 2012
4:52 pm

For me, the issue is more with how Domino’s is marketing the product as gluten free when in fact it is not free of gluten. Those who have Celiac Disease or Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity will not be able to try the pizza due to the cross contact. I think the very creation of this gluten-free crust speaks to Domino’s responding to the fad diet aspect of the gluten-free diet. Why make a gluten-free crust and then tell the people who need it the most not to eat it? In my opinion, the crux of the problem for those with celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity with Domino’s gluten-free crust is the Amber Designation given to them by the NFCA. This designation does not require enough safeguards to keep products free of cross contamination. So far, the Gluten Intolerance Group has asked the NFCA to remove their Amber designation from their training program and 1 in 133 had started a petition asking for the same. Gluten free shouldn’t be used as a marketing term, rather it should stand for a product that is free of gluten, otherwise it really means nothing.

Debra

May 17th, 2012
5:13 pm

My 2 year old granddaughter is so extremely wheat allergic we have to carry an Epi pen,this sometimes not about a tend or fad,for us,it is her life being at stake.

Judge Smails

May 17th, 2012
5:26 pm

I am very aware of the Celiac disease, having been in the restaurant business for decades. My question is…what have we done (or not done) as a society that would create these allergies. I swear they did not exist 40 years ago.

It’s like ADD or ADHD. Where was that when I was a kid?

I think sometimes Doctors just make up new illnesses to cover up the fact that they don’t know WHAT it is!

K

May 17th, 2012
6:43 pm

@GF (ironic choice of handles, given the topic): May you receive the same level of empathy in your time of difficulty that you have shown to sufferers here. That is to say: none.

No one *asks* for an allergy. No one asks for the stress and hassle of constantly worrying about the contents of every food item they purchase. Gluten is in more products than you’d think: it’s not just a matter of avoiding bread and pasta. No one asks for the increased time they have to invest in food preparation because they aren’t able to grab a quick bite from a drive-through during an especially busy day. No one asks for the stress of being the “problem” diner, where they’re the reason that others have to adjust plans because one restaurant offers a gluten-free menu and another doesn’t. No one asks to never be able to eat a croissant again. No one asks to be the one excluded when treats are brought into the office — other people can eat what you bring, but you can’t eat what they bring … and shared meals are part of building community.

Having celiac disease is about deprivation. People diagnosed with it suffer every day far more than any of us without it can truly understand. Any inconvenience we experience from it is trivial compared to living with it 24/7/365. I am fortunate enough to have dodged it, but my sister was diagnosed a few years ago, and it has completely changed her life. She’s the mother of a young child, and this is just one more complication. I applaud her for the courage she has displayed in learning to live with it.

Based on your trollish post, it sounds like you could use some supplements in your diet as well: compassion and empathy.

JJ

May 17th, 2012
7:39 pm

At first I was so excited about Dominos offering a GF pizza…now I am just mad! My 10 year old daughter has celiac disease and although I am glad that this fad has allowed her to eat at more places I still wonder why did they decide to offer a GF pizza and then say that those with Celiac Disease should not eat it. Well…im not going to take the chance of cross contamination…it’s not worth her throwing up all night and then her body taking 2 weeks to recover from the gluten. Oh well…

JM

May 18th, 2012
7:02 am

Judge Smalls, my father, a coal miner in Appalachia until retirement, died from complications from another auto-immune disease at age 48. I would say he’s not a wimp, as coal mining is back-breaking no one in suburban Chicago is ever likely to understand. For your education, Celiac Disease is an auto-immune disease like Type 2 diabetes–maybe you’ve heard if that? I got the gene for celiac from him. His mom, my grandma, has type 2 diabetes do we probably got the gene from. The only difference is that instead of having to avoid sugar like my life depends on it, it’s gluten. That and my grandma doesn’t have to suffer stupid comments like yours about her dietary restrictions. Children DID die from complications of celiac disease but no one knew why. It was likely attributed to a “weak constitution” because these children tend to be sick a lot and underweight/height. I invite you to read studies of celiac/crohns from 1950s by Drs. Haas as a way to inform yourself of some the history of celiac awareness.

Personally, I have a resulting neurological condition, and possibly Crohns now, too (testing still in progress by my GI) as a result of my celiac being undiagnosed for 24 years. But there are much worse cases where a lot more permanent brain damage and other types of damage to organ systems has happened, so I feel lucky. One thing I definitely DON’T feel like at this point? A wimp.

Daisy

May 18th, 2012
1:23 pm

Jenny, I disagree that this “shows that GF needs are being recognized” because what Domino’s is really saying is “we want to jump on the GF bandwagon without doing any actual work to make the product truly GF.” There are chain restaurants that take cross-contamination seriously, like Jason’s Deli and P.F. Chang’s, so it can be done. But this Domino’s offering does nothing except make me have to explain to well-meaning friends that no, even though Dominos calls it GF, I still can’t eat it. And to those questioning the increase in gluten sensitivity, I had chronic stomach pain since childhood (and I was born in the 60s). Doctors called it stress or IBS. Since going gluten free, the pain is gone, along with my periodic hives and vertigo. I think it is more an issue of an increase in diagnosis than that no one had gluten sensitivity or celiac in the past.

a good step

May 18th, 2012
4:56 pm

I suspect this comes from Domino’s realizing that most folks these days avoiding gluten don’t actually have Celiac disease. 1% of the population is gluten intolerant (i.e. Celiac), but roughly a third are gluten sensitive (most in both groups are undiagnosed). A third of the population represents quite a large market. Beyond that, plenty of folks nowadays in neither category are avoiding gluten due to legitimate concerns over its role in a number of inflammatory/degenerative diseases. It’s a trend that doesn’t show any sign of slowing, and nice to see a major company like Domino’s taking it seriously.

Dessy

May 18th, 2012
5:37 pm

To answer the individuals who can’t seem to comprehend why there have been an influx in allergies that weren’t common forty or fifty years ago, we began altering food sources somewhere between the forties and sixties to make them grow more “efficiently” , grow larger and defend themselves against bugs and diseases. By doing so we have altered food sources to the point of harming ourselves. It is only recently that concerned individuals have been able to identify and pinpoint the causes of so many illnesses and “conditions” that so many people suffer today. When the majority comes to the conclusion that it is more important how our food is produced than how it “looks” we may speed up the journey back but not by much. It took years to come to this point and will, I’m afraid, take many more to go back. It begins with ignorance being addressed!

gluten

May 19th, 2012
11:47 pm

Thanks for posting this well written article. I am writing a paper for school and I did a lot of searching and found your points to be some of the best. I appreciate you taking the time to write this.

http://www.felicitysglutenfreehandbook.com

Bob from Accounttemps

May 21st, 2012
8:25 am

@JM’s comparison to diabetes is apt — and yet, we have all these big companies jumping on the “gluten-free” bandwagon and none (not one to my knowledge) embracing diabetic-friendly offerings. Yet, diabetes is far more prevalent. Why is it that certain ailments and diseases all of the sudden get this type of attention when, with all due respect, they are less serious and less prevalent than diabetes? Sure you can always get fruit for dessert (what my dad typically does), but you don’t think he’d like a nice sugar-free dessert like everyone else enjoys?

Not Bob

May 22nd, 2012
12:44 am

Your father doesn’t need dessert to survive. Also diabetes is very heavily self inflicted due to poor diet and poor choices (the piece of dessert comes to mind)… sure there is a genetic dissposition to it… but it can be prevented. Celiac and gluten sensitivity is an actual disease that (at this time) cannot be reversed or cured.. you can only prevent symptoms by controlling what you eat. Diabetes can be prevented, reduced and cured with proper food management. People with celiac or gluten sensitivity can only prevent issues with proper food management. It never goes away.

Bob from Accounttemps

May 22nd, 2012
9:35 am

@Not Bob – arrogant much? My dad had a stroke which triggered the diabetes. Last I checked, the “gluten free” rage surrounds such necessary staple items as pizza (here) and cupcakes. Your post is why people are so suspect of these latest rages – you are so invested in your ailment that you fail to recognize that there are many others managing many other ailments. If you’re that sick, I guess you don’t need to even eat out do you? Yours is a ridiculous and condescending post and you seek special treatment above others who suffer similar issues. I didn’t suggest everyone should cater to diabetics (they don’t), but I do ask why there is catering to this less prevalent ailment — shrill voices such as yours and the opportunity to market to them would be my guess.

Karen

May 22nd, 2012
12:59 pm

Jenny – can you please list out the other Gluten Free pizza options you have found in Atlanta? We are always looking for good GF pizza and other GF restaurant options (my husband has sensitivity).

gluten

May 22nd, 2012
1:52 pm

I’ve had doctors accuse me of being anorexic or depressed when I was trying to figure out what was wrong with me. It was horrible with tons of pain and cramps. Once I started my gluten free diet it changed my life!
http://www.felicitysglutenfreehandbook.com

Mindy

May 23rd, 2012
1:03 pm

I have non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Before trying the pizza, I called my local Dominos for some info. I was told that while there was a chance of cross contamination with toppings and utensils it wasn’t huge. I was told that the only actual flour in the shop is corn flour. I was told that the GF crusts come pre-wrapped and do not touch other crusts, and that they are taken directly from the plastic to a clean pan that they keep just for the GF crusts. I was also told that while other precautions (clean gloves, etc) are not typically taken, the workers in his shop use the plastic the crust comes in to handle it and that they don’t let their actual hands touch the crust. Although I don’t have celiac disease, when I eat gluten, I know it (gastrointestinal issues and a rash). I tried the pizza — still didn’t taste like a nice, bready pizza crust, but it didn’t taste awful as many gf products do and I could actually pick up a slice without the whole thing falling apart. It was also crunchy around the edges (in a good way). I was very happy with it — and no gluten insensitivity issues at all. I will order it again.

Jenny Turknett

May 23rd, 2012
6:19 pm

Mindy, thanks for sharing your experience!