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Best Blog comment ever

From Darin, who is never allowed to stop commenting on this blog:

Mad Lib for Atlanta-restaurant blog comments:

You think _________ can make good _________ cuisine? Dude, you don’t know what good ________ is!! Get your _________ out of the sand and go visit _________, where I grew up. That’s where the real stuff is! Seriously, you can’t even get a decent _________ in Atlanta.

21 comments Add your comment

Lisa

November 18th, 2009
4:42 pm

too great! Madlibs for food. Lisa

Darin

November 18th, 2009
4:49 pm

Full disclosure: I ripped the idea off from the similar Yelp.com Review Madlibs I saw on the wall of Crawfish Shack Seafood today. I got both great fried fish and comedy in one lunch. Can’t beat it.

Nonetheless, I accept the accolade and will continue to comment as requested. :)

TnGelding

November 18th, 2009
5:49 pm

I’m sorry, but I fail to see the brilliance. And I read it when it was posted.

HotLantaHobo

November 18th, 2009
6:26 pm

It is so all too true of what ends up on AJC blogs…..you could make variations in the template for any subject.

But it’s also indicative of what goes on in the Atlanta dining scene. Problem is that Atlanta only has one true local cuisine, the southern meat and three and it’s one that’s very difficult to pull off well due to its simplicity. It’s like playing Mozart….there is no room for error or it just becomes a mess. It’s even more difficult when the cooking has to be done by immigrants who have no background in the cuisine they attempt to cook.

Now add a pervasive attitude that makes constructive criticism unwelcome. Throw in a xenophobia of anything not southern. And presto, we get a typical AJC comments section.

It would be nice if there was a little more openness to the outside ideas that would make a lot of places better, especially since most any non-southern cuisine here was not available until the past 40 years or so.

Laverne

November 18th, 2009
7:07 pm

Hobo, Greyhound is ready when you are.

Chip Shoulder

November 18th, 2009
7:17 pm

Appears to be a variation on a theme. After reading comments lamenting Atlanta’s lack of any good Thai restaurants on Omnivore, I was compelled to write this about The Shed on Glenwood:

http://blogs.creativeloafing.com/omnivore/2009/10/16/cliff%E2%80%99s-top-10-favorite-restaurants-countdown-number-6/

# Chip Shoulder Says:
October 16th, 2009 at 1:29 pm

I don’t know. this might be a decent Shed by Atlanta’s middling standards, but I’ve been in Sheds in NYC and LA that blow this Shed out of the water.

Bobby

November 18th, 2009
7:41 pm

Hey Hobo and Shoulder, read Laverne’s comment and DO IT!!!!!!!!!!!

downsouth

November 18th, 2009
7:56 pm

Ho-blow, not many places had much of a varied dining scene 40 years ago, except a handful of big cities, and places / neighborhoods where one ethnic restaurant might be located. go check some foodie history and you’ll see pretty quicky it was all meat and potatoes, wherever you were. atlanta didn’t have the ethnic popultion that it does today; it was severely divided on black / white lines only for the most part. get over yourself.

Alkamom

November 18th, 2009
8:16 pm

Art

November 19th, 2009
9:15 am

There’s seems to be a lot simmering here than just food. Thanks to our much maligned airport and the fact that air travel has become a form of mass transportation, Atlanta has gathered cultures and foods from around the world. Just drive down Buford highway if you don’t believe it. On a recent trip to Greece, I searched high and low for a really good gyro and could never find one that comes close to beating the ones at Nick’s Grecian Gyro on Virginia Avenue in Hapeville. Atlanta offers far more than just meat and three. Love your blog John…

ihateugly

November 19th, 2009
9:37 am

Laverne, Bobby and downsouth epitomize the Lewis Grizzard ethos of Atlanta, if you have a criticism of the south either real or perceived then get the hell out. I don’t know why there is an inferiority complex that resonates so pervasively in this area. Hobo said her opinion it is fine if you disagree but she made the sin of disparaging Atlanta, xenophobia isn’t a strong enough word to describe this attitude. Talk about getting over yourself, relax. Oh and by the way I’m here to stay baby.

Reds

November 19th, 2009
9:40 am

That literally made me laugh out loud when i read it on the original blog comments. Atlanta may not have the most authentic, or the best, or the whatever. But most of us like what we have. I’ve traveled, and have found food that I loved everywhere, but coming home to my native Atlanta I always know where to go to the get food that I want!!

Lovin’ the series John. Can’t wait to see what other tricks you have up your sleeve. :)

HotLantaHobo

November 19th, 2009
10:34 am

Art, you’re right on about the gyros thing. Was just in Paris and usually sample a “donau kepab” at one of the numerous pseudo-Greek (they’re usually run by Turks) 30-combo stands and agree that most aren’t as good as what’s found here.

My point was that even though Atlanta is now a crossroads of the world and has a wide of array of newly-brought cuisines they weren’t always here. People relocate here from everywhere bringing with them ideas about how these foods should be prepared and served, because they were long-running traditions in their hometowns. People from coastal areas have been cooking seafood forever and when they don’t find it like they left it are disappointed. People from regions with long-running ethnic groups (German, Polish, Italian, etc.) expect to find some of the things they left behind in the midwest and northeast and do complain wistfully for their lost cuisines. Hence these feelings get summed up in the funny template that is the subject of this blog.

But as Art and Ihateugly mentioned, it does seem odd that several have no use for meaningful discussion of a reasonable topic.

Laverne

November 19th, 2009
11:32 am

Ugly, sometimes southerners are being facetious, not hostile.Some of us even laugh at ourselves( as well as others.)That is how my Greyhound statement was intended, sorry it was lost in translation.I would have explained this at the beginning but I felt that would sort of kill the joke. Dang ,this is a lot worst than bombing on amateur night at the Improv.

curious

November 19th, 2009
12:06 pm

best gyro i had was in greek town in detroit. it was much better than nicks.

curious

November 19th, 2009
12:11 pm

and there was a casino across the street.

John Kessler

November 19th, 2009
2:41 pm

Well, it’s up to all of us to keep the tone here one of constructive criticism with one dose of good humor and another of shared insight. All things told, I think we have at least a quorum.
Our motto? MARTA’s ready, and so are we!

RK

November 20th, 2009
11:14 am

That is blasphemy! The donar kebabs in Europe are fantastic. Nothing here comes close.

Kris 10

November 20th, 2009
11:49 am

And Curious and RK just prove Darin’s point.

TCfan

November 21st, 2009
5:22 pm

Just tried Nick’s Food to Go on MLK for the first time last week, and it was one of the best gyros I’ve had yet including ones in Greece and Turkey.

ESA

November 22nd, 2009
10:53 am

This is all too true. What I find funny is that the writer always suggests we visit some exurb that combines the worst of the inner city with the convenience and vibrant nightlife of an unnamed island in the Okefenokee. I know I should feel sorry for those people but the combination of the blatant demonstration of sheer stupidity and the suggestion that I travel scores of miles to someplace such as Cumming, Douglasville, Conyers or Riverdale for a meal just makes me bitter and angry. When you move to such a place, don’t expect people to come experience the one pearl that has been cast among the local swine. You gave up that right when you moved out there in the first place.