What happens to workers when jobs leave for good?

WASHINGTON — Over the last year, out-of-work Americans, already down on their luck, have had to endure a barrage of unsympathetic, even mean-spirited, criticism from several of their elected representatives. Many Republicans, especially, have portrayed the jobless as either shiftless deadbeats too lazy to look for work or pompous failures too proud to take a job beneath their social standing.

Neither analysis is an accurate reflection of the desolate landscape in which many American workers find themselves. Surely those Republicans know that the unemployment rate has been stuck near ten percent for a year and a half; there are about five applicants for every job opening.

And, as Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke said recently on “60 Minutes,” we’re unlikely to see a flush economy for several more years. That’s because the recent recession, brought on by Wall Street excesses, isn’t the only culprit.

For decades now, globalization and technology have been grinding away at American jobs, a process which has gained speed of late. And most of those jobs are never coming back.

Take my southern Alabama hometown. Best known as the  setting for Harper Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird,” it was never a prosperous place, but its textile mills and pulpwood plants used to provide a decent living for working-class residents.

The textile company now known as VF Corporation brought factories to Monroeville in the 1930s, providing paychecks to women (mostly) from the white working-class. By the 1970s, black women were also employed at its sewing machines, making Vanity Fair underwear sold in well-known department stores.

By the 1980s, Parsons & Whittemore Enterprises, one of the world’s largest producers of pulp for paper-making, was operating several mills in Monroe County. Its Alabama River Companies became the local standard for good wages. In 2000, Medline, a huge manufacturer and distributor of health care products and hospital scrubs, opened a small facility that seemed to promise a semblance of security.

But times have changed. The sewing mills have largely moved to low wage countries such as Vietnam and Bangladesh. Medline closed its Monroeville facility, though it has expanded its operations in Mexico and other locales.

For its part, the pulp business has been buffeted by such disparate technology-related trends as the decline of newspapers (a huge consumer of newsprint) and the rise of digital cameras (which circumvent the old print-snapshots-on paper habit). Plants have been shuttered and workers laid off. Some may eventually be re-hired, but many will not find work again that pays as well.

While the state of Alabama has an unemployment rate of 8.9 percent, lower than the national average, Monroe County has an unemployment rate of about 16 percent. Its jobless residents can knock on doors, submit applications and spend countless hours in re-training classes at the local community college, but most are unlikely to find work any time soon. If your job experience is limited to cutting and dying at a textile mill, you’ll find it difficult to remake yourself as a nurse or a computer technician.

The prospects for Monroeville’s jobless workers won’t be transformed by the deal that President Obama has struck with Republican leaders, who insisted on maintaining Bush-era tax cuts for the richest Americans. The owners of textile plants are unlikely to decide that southern Alabama has suddenly become better for business than Brazil. Nor will the hiring plans at Georgia Pacific, which bought Parsons & Whittemore’s Monroe County holdings, change because its executives keep more money in their pockets.

The best news for the unemployed all over the country is that Obama managed to wrest a year-long extension of unemployment benefits out of the deal. For those workers who have nothing else, that’s the difference between eating and going hungry, paying the heating bill and sitting in the cold.

Indeed, Congress — despite its deficit hawks and its compassion-less conservatives — needs to reconsider the old idea that unemployment benefits are a short-term lifeline that is dropped after a recession ends. This was no ordinary recession; it is an earthquake that is destroying the old economy and creating a new one in its wake.

The victims of those tectonic shifts — especially workers too old to learn a new skill or move to a new city – may need long-term, government-funded assistance. It’s not their fault that the ground suddenly shifted beneath their feet.

457 comments Add your comment

Soames

December 8th, 2010
12:16 pm

Currency reform will solve a lot of our job woes. Politicians on BOTH sides of the aisle have been waiting on our largest trading partner (China) to change their ways and play by WTO rules, rules that they agreed to. The current Administration acts like it wants to address this issue but they aren’t going to. Geithner won’t even call them out as currency manipulators, even though the rest of the World knows it. Republicans and Democrats are both culpable.

China were mercantilists before mercantilism was cool. Mercantilism and global free trade cannot coexist.

Back to your partisan bickering….

Roark

December 8th, 2010
12:18 pm

…and what exactly is too old to learn a new skill? perhaps that is a condition that qualifies one for the death panels. By the way, who is Tucker to accuse anyone of mean-spirited criticism? There is nothing but typical attacking, partisan noise here.

Perhaps Tucker should have borrowed more heavily from the solid analysis posted by Dr Jason Thomas today on the CNN opinion page.

In the middle getting squeezed

December 8th, 2010
12:18 pm

jconservative@9:25 am

Good post.

————————————————

Let’s go a little further.

The NAFTA plan and MFN status have totally forked manufacturing in this country. Those countries subsidize the plants built and care nothing for the environment in those areas. That and extremely low wages make it impossible for American workers to compete. The import taxes need to be raised to take into account the manufacturing costs that the government is subsidizing.

I know Americans want cheaper cost products, but at what cost to the USA. We don’t need to buy underwear weekly. Most of the products made in other countries are WANTS for the American buyers.
We are old enough that our wants don’t hurt us if we don’t get them.

Has anyone been to Kannapolis NC recently to see what happens to a town when the ONLY decent jobs in town leave?

Read up on Cannon Mills and see the what and why they closed ALL their mills in 2002.

To those who suggest moving to where the jobs are. Have you thought of the costs of moving? Does the man or woman of the house just leave to find work (leaving the rest of the family behind)?

And by the way Harry Callahan.

I have seen some of your posts in the past where you say you have shown them to co-woorkers for a laugh and that you work 50 hour weeks.

Is this because you and your co-workers are doing the work of another that was layed off? Maybe the company you work for can go to 60 hour weeks and lay someone else off. Maybe you.

I suggest you show all the posts you have made over the months to your BOSS and possibly stockholders in your company before they decide who gets layed off next.

GT/MIT

December 8th, 2010
12:20 pm

@ ctucker;

I have read with interest your comments about jobs, WHAT you believe creates or dissolves them. I don’t know what brought you to some of the conclusions you’ve drawn but you and many others who rely on someone else for their livelihood, need to take a closer at the WHY of job creation.

For the most part small business owners mortgaged the security of themselves and their families to start their company. They did not wake up one morning and lo-and-behold they were entrepreneurs, as many of your correspondences seem to think. Another important bit of information is, that they did not risk their future just so you could have a job. They were attempting to, dare I use the word, profit, from their investment.

I believe I read somewhere that you believe government, especially Republican government is the root cause of “out sourcing”. Taint so, although government restriction, bureaucratic meddling, and taxation, don’t help much, the overriding reason companies move their operation to other countries, is “labor cost”.

Somewhere around the mid 1950’s labor unions ran out of things to demand, so in order to keep up membership (dues), they decided push on until someone stopped them. Well, nobody did and as a result we lost our competitiveness in the world market. In steps the government, but they realized that there were too many votes at stake to throttle back the unions. I know said one politician to another, lets levy an import tax on products made in other countries that can be sold to consumers cheaper than our own stuff, that way the unions will still love us, throw money into election campaigns, and maybe even vote for us. We’ll be artificially competitive and no one will care.

Now to my point in this mess, I ask you ms. Tucker, which party does the labor unions support ?, taint the Republicans.

Liberal Chicks are UGLY

December 8th, 2010
12:22 pm

You know, I have seen a lot in my life, but it just never ceases to amaze me how little you know about jobs, economy and such, but yet you have no fear in making a fool of yourself…I guess I should admire that.

Many manufacturing jobs leave largely because of taxes and unions. Between those two, companies have to find a way to cheapen the manufacturing or their products will cost to much and no one will by them. Now, many companies have gone over board thinking they can outsource everything. It happens that a painful lesson is often learned and these companies lose billions because of outsourcing. It’s really to do with skilled labor. Any momo can push a button, but the skilled labor outsourced often turns out to be a disaster. There is a lot of infrastructure that is taken for granted in the U.S. that simply isn’t present in the foreign countries. So in the end it’s actually self regulating.

Now jobs change, you have to adjust that’s all their is to it. It’s really not more complicated than that. You don’t see elevator operators any more, and its ludicrous to pay someone to push a button just to give somebody something to do.

Scout

December 8th, 2010
12:22 pm

“What happens to workers when jobs leave for good?”

Ah, …………… they don’t have jobs anymore?

By the way, if anti-capitalist, pro-union, elitist, tax tax tax, knucklehead liberals didn’t force corporations to go overseas we might not have this problem.

Lil' Barry Bailout

December 8th, 2010
12:22 pm

snoqualmiefalls: where are the jobs, where are the jobs?
————-

Ask the Democrat party, which holds large majorities in both houses of Congress as well as the White House. ‘Tard.

granny godzilla

December 8th, 2010
12:25 pm

What happens to workers when jobs leave for good?

Based on what I have read above…..the typical American conservative
doesn’t give a rats ass – as long as they have theirs.

Anybody surprised in the least?

Just Existing

December 8th, 2010
12:27 pm

CT-
The ignorance and viciousness of some of these posters takes one’s breath away, doesn’t it?

They don’t have, don’t want and never will get a clue as far as the plight of the long-term unemployed goes. I worked for 40 years in the healthcare industry before I lost my job in 2009 and NO one wants to hire anyone over the age of 55
or who has been out of work longer than six months.

Thank you for lending your voice of reason and sanity in a world which would rather prefer to see us cease to exist.

Mala Cori

December 8th, 2010
12:28 pm

MC: Don’t worry. I’m a legal American citizen and my parents waited 10 years for the appropriate paperwork to immigrate here from Europe in the late 60’s. I respect all immigrants, but don’t support illegal immigrants and refuse to hire them or use contractors that sub contract to them. My parents never worked under the table. My mom cleaned houses and was paid in cash, but they always reported every dime of her income to the IRS (I used to help them fill out their tax returns even at 12 yrs old to make sure their spelling was understandable). Next to not living on credit, my parents said that the next most important rule of finance is to meet your tax obligations (something a few politicians should learn). Their English wasn’t great, but they spoke several other languages and always worked on improving their English. My parents are in their 80’s now and still take community college classes in language and computer sciences. They bank on-line, read news and trade stocks on the internet, work out, garden, etc. If they had to go to work tomorrow, they’d be hired for sure! I am proud to pay my fair share of taxes, but don’t think I should pay more because of a government’s (or public’s) mismanagement of finances.

They BOTH suck

December 8th, 2010
12:30 pm

@GT/MT

Nice post with some valid points, but you purposely fail to mention that numerous jobs in various industries with little to no union representation have also been outsourced.

If you take about 5 minutes or less, you can quickly look up that most of the outsourcing have been NON UNION jobs.

You are more than welcome to believe that less regulation and taxes are going to keep jobs in the US when they are being outsourced to people making in many cases less than 5000.00 per year. That is your choice.

Granted unions have not helped, but you seem to be much smarter than the biased, one sided posts you bring to the table.

Put it ALL in context, not just what you want to believe. You cry about CT (yes she is guilty) yet you do the same exact thing. Two peas in a pod?

They BOTH suck

December 8th, 2010
12:34 pm

People keep talking about the corporate tax rate in the US.

On paper it is one of the highest in the world, but is it the rate that the majority pay or not?

Who knows where we rank in terms of nominal rates?

I do

Nominal rate = actual rate paid for those on either side that do not know

willie lynch

December 8th, 2010
12:35 pm

Just Existing

December 8th, 2010
12:27 pm

There won’t be much argument coming your way. Reality shuts their mouths.

HDB

December 8th, 2010
12:38 pm

Wage Slave December 8th, 2010
12:15 pm

Not EVERYONE can find a job; there are those 50+ year olds that employers are not hiring! They are either considered too old or “overqualified” for whatever’s out there!!

unsympathetic

December 8th, 2010
12:38 pm

I just spoke with someone the other day that lost their job as a crane operator. Instead of sitting around for 99 weeks on unemployment, he looked into becoming a truck driver as soon as he felt his job was in danger. Within 4 months of being laid off he had a CDL and was working for a company. Today he is making the same amount as he did as a crane operator. There is also a shortage of truck drivers. Guess it is about priorities. Are these people willing to leave their comfortable hometown, which lacks opportunity, create a business, retrain for a new profession, or work for $10 an hour(same as unemployment)? Also, unless you have Alzhemers, it’s never too late to learn a new skill.

unsympathetic

December 8th, 2010
12:39 pm

Meant to say Alzheimer’s (sorry for the typo)

Darko

December 8th, 2010
12:42 pm

Sadly sooner or later the people who lose those manufacturing jobs have to face the reality – that income isn’t coming back. Long term unemplyment benefits only delay facing the facts. Of course, “educated” people don’t pay attention to where things were made and often pat themselves on the back for buying a foreign car that was “assembled” in the US. But an American car assembled in Canada or Mexico means far more jobs to the US. Don’t give me that quality BS, I’ve driven American cars to over 200k with no engine or transmission failures and none of that expensive 30k, 60k and 90k maintenance Toyota and Honda takes you for. It’s worse with other industries where there’s nothing left. I’ve been buying made in USA (or at least North America) whenever possible for the past 25 years.

ronald

December 8th, 2010
12:45 pm

Cynthia- Please stop your distortion of Wall St. You’ve never worked half as hard as they work and your class envy is leading you to say things that just aren’t true.

You said “That’s because the recent recession, brought on by Wall Street excesses, isn’t the only culprit.”

The recession was brought about because US consumers stopped making their mortgage payments. Wall St. did not force people to stop making mortgage payments. Wall Street held many of the mortgage backed securities that were backed by those mortgages and were they themselves damaged by the consumer’s failure to make payments. (see Lehman Brothers failure).

ml

December 8th, 2010
12:46 pm

the myths that everybody down on their luck deserves it and caused it all by themselves is so horrible to hear people say, so heartless, especially when it comes from people that say they are similar to Jesus. and they crazy mixed up myth of trickle down economics.
it’s really hard to keep watching middle class people who know the rich CEO types are hurting them continue to angrily defend and continue to support them and their sidekicks the Republican Party. I thought surely by now people would have wised up. nope. got to admit to fault first and after demonizing others to support something clearly bad, that’s hard to do. but being without money and being desperate is even harder and still people can’t put down the BS and starts really fixing things. it’s unbeleivable.
corporations have so rigged things and so manipulated the system. they move their plants overseas and blame the American worker or some filthy liberal for it.
then they can profit even further by just floating the rumor around a couple or so states that they are thinking about building a plant in the area. KIA, etc. states get into a bidding war with each other and then they can receive things like free land to build that plant on or huge tax breaks and even total tax credits, something no small business has available to them. but I thought capitalism was all fair. all this just the state can get a little tax money from workers salaries and a few other pennies elsewhere. hardly justifying the concessions given to get the business built in the state.
and these are the people, the CEO’s and Republican politicians, that whine and say they need more tax breaks.
how in the world is any person who isn’t a greedy rich person still supporting these ’shoot yourself in the foot’ tactics?

Hmmmmm

December 8th, 2010
12:47 pm

@ CAS Dec. 8th 8:45 am

Well said…I agree with you. The sad part about all of this is that this seems to be a political issue and we have the urge to place the blame with one party or the other. When do we stop? When the country is flat on its back? Come on folks its time to stop fighting, and come up with some real answers!

I will start…how about encouraging the poor and middle class to save more, and spend what they must wisely? So that in the event of a crisis or the next bubble bursting they might have something to sustain themselves.

How about teaching our children to dream of owning their own businesses?
How about really making an effort to make Public Education a great Education?
We spend Billions on prisons (air condition, 3 squares, television, recreation, clothing, water, medical care, computer access, libraries)these are some of the luxuries prisoners and inmates have.
But when it comes to helping a productive other wise hardworking U.S. Citizen get through a rough time we have a problem with it? I’m just saying? LET’S MOVE FORWARD!

Mala Cori

December 8th, 2010
12:49 pm

willie lynch: I can understand your point about ‘not blaming the borrower’, but we need some common sense in our society. Everyone is trying to sell you something every minute of the day. One doesn’t have to be a rocket scientist or an accountant to control themselves and not buy into a sales pitch. I think self control of personal finances is something that can’t be taught at school or by the government. It really starts with good common sense economic values at home. And if you can’t get financial education from your parents or school, you can go to the library, read on-line etc. In an age of 100% access to information, how can people be so dumb when it comes to managing a dollar or buying into a sub-prime mortage and not understand the risks? Peraonl finances for the average America is not calculus; it’s basic grade 6 math. It puzzles me???

Jeff

December 8th, 2010
12:51 pm

CT, I’ll give you the opportunity that you so kindly gave us: What specifically do you propose to cut from the budget in order to pay for this?

Nothing Is Free

December 8th, 2010
12:52 pm

AmVet

- -Hell, more often than not you can’t even make your first post of the day towards me of that non-insulting variety.- -

My original post to you this morning:

It’s the wars, huh?
LOL!!
How pathetic.
The vast majority of the cost of the wars go back into the US economy. Do you think we build tanks and F-22s in Mexico?

Perhaps you should start posting on a site about gardening or home décor. I don’t think your skin is thick enough for a political blog.

Tell Bookman I said hello.

Understands business needs

December 8th, 2010
1:00 pm

This column is a perfect example of why The Atlanta Journal / Constitution’s readership drops every year. Why is Cynthia Tucker not fired? I did not read about the mounds of government regulation heaped apron all manufactures. Of course bleeding heart liberals like Tucker would never understand this.

Choices

December 8th, 2010
1:01 pm

Hi all, just to interject some perspective into the argument. I work in HR, and literally just came back from a UI hearing. The reason for the hearing? An employee couldn’t find a babysitter for her kids, and called her employer and said she was quitting, because she had already received warnings regarding her absenteeism.

The DOL in it’s infinite wisdom allowed the awarding of benefits to the employee becuase she was FORCED to quit to take care of her kids. In addition, the original determining officer scolded my client and accused her of “punishing an employee because she has kids” (Really, I’m not making this up).

Obviously I appealed that determination and had to spend the last 2 hours convincing the DOL that Georgia is an at will state, and the employee is free to quit her job if she finds it to inconvenient to her childcare schedule. However, it is not the employers responsibility to assure that employees have , babysitters, childcare, carpools, bus fare etc…. and to award an employee benefits for her actions is GROSSLY inappropriate.

Hopefully this time around the DOL will see the light. My point? we could save MILLIONS of dollars by replacing the Governemnt rubber stampers with people that actually use basic evaluation and decision making processes.

Thanks for the rant.

Billybob

December 8th, 2010
1:01 pm

CT says….don’t worry peeps, me and duh gub’t gon’ take care of ya’ fo’ever, just gib us yo’ vote when da’ vote time comes. Dem’ mean ole’ ‘publicans don’t care none ’bout you. ‘Publicans wanna teach you to fish, but me an duh gub’t jus’ give da’ fish to ya’. What be easier for ya’? Don’t fo’get, when da’ vote time comes, democrat vote is free fishes an da’ ‘publican vote is dat’ nasty workin’ fo’ da’ fishes. The far left is so easy to dissect, so please keep talking Tucker, you continue to help……conservatives.

Good Grief

December 8th, 2010
1:04 pm

CT – How about this for a question:

“What incentives do corporations have to stay in the US?”

If I’m a business, and the government tells me they are raising my taxes, I have to pass that along to the consumer through either a higher price for goods and service, or a cut in overhead (labor, materials, etc.) in order to maintain profitability. At some point, though, customers wills top using my service because of the price. If I want to stay in business I can either cut my workforce further, or I can move to a country that won’t raise my taxes.

Kamchak

December 8th, 2010
1:04 pm

Who knows where we rank in terms of nominal rates?

Well according to CBPP, between 2000-2005 it was 13.4% while other developed countries averaged 16.1% But there will be people that point to the 35% statutory rate.

Keep up the good fight!

December 8th, 2010
1:05 pm

The Tribe has spoken….Nonsense is off the island.

I missed his complete ban from Bookman. I would have have enjoyed that one.

Too bad even the simplest of statements is not true from Nonsense. Yes we may assemble tanks and F-22s in the US but not all of the parts are made in the US. But absolutely no proof that the “vast majority of costs of the wars go back into the US economy” and it ignores the drain on the US economy.

But certainly Nonsense’s head is thick enough for a blog.

Chris Matthews

December 8th, 2010
1:05 pm

All Democrats fault! Sorry CT, I can’t put you back on my show because the ratings are always lower when you are a guest!

GT/MIT

December 8th, 2010
1:05 pm

They BOTH suck

I going to guess that your a union person and as such feel singled out for criticism. I can assure you that thats not the case. I believe that if you’ll actually read my post you’ll find in it this quote, “although government restriction, bureaucratic meddling, and taxation, don’t help much, the overriding reason companies move their operation to other countries, is “labor cost”. The latest example of this is the administrative and monetary burden placed on business by what has been called “Obama care”. No small thing and the more employees the larger the burden.

When an organization, a union in this case tells you that as an employee you somehow have a right to help manage the company and share in the rewards even though you have taken no risks, I believe a reasonable person would know the sump um just ain’t right here. Every employed person deserves to be equitably compensated for his contributions to the company, however the value of that contribution should be judged by the person who risked his entire future to establish that enterprise. If as an employee you don’t agree, you are free to seek employment elsewhere.

You won’t like this either, the right to disagree is yours.

Williebkind

December 8th, 2010
1:07 pm

We need to start maufacturing products in the US again. Fire CT and hire her as an industrial housekeeper. Repeal her PP award and monies received from this affirmative gift. Also, make GG’s husband work for a US company in the US or fire him too.

Remember that global economy the liberals have pushed on us along with global warming and CO2 intoxicants. The liberals have starved an oil based economy and now look at gas prices the meager income people have to pay. Yes it will take years to bring the economy back but even longer if the democrats do not take back their party. Liberals are cancer to this country and any country. They put vile disgusting behavior as a priority and that too will add to the misery of our land.

Kentucky is building an Ark replicant that will bring millions into the cash starved state. Now liberals are screaming separation of church and state. I thought the Ark is part of history. I guess that has been rewritten by liberals too. This separation of church and state is a liberal interpretation and is factually baseless. But what can we expect from progressive liberals.

Kamchak

December 8th, 2010
1:08 pm

This column is a perfect example of why The Atlanta Journal / Constitution’s readership drops every year.

If I had a ha’penny for every time that worthless little tidbit has been posted…

This is what you get when you vote Republican!!!!

December 8th, 2010
1:08 pm

Wanna know what happened to our country, everyone of you posters need to read:

WILLIAM KLEINKNECHT’S BOOK:
RONALD REAGAN, THE MAN WHO SOLD THE WORLD?

Where did it all begin: January 1980. When did it all end? January 2010.

Anybody who believes that the majority of the unemployed is sitting at home
waiting for welfare, is an idiot; and if you are going to talk about the unemployed,
please speak of the corporate welfare that has bankrupted this nation.

Williebkind

December 8th, 2010
1:12 pm

This is what you get when you vote Republican!!!!

December 8th, 2010
1:08 pm
You are great progressive liberal–enough said!

Keep up the good fight!

December 8th, 2010
1:12 pm

This column is a perfect example of why The Atlanta Journal / Constitution’s readership drops every year.

Personally I blame Wingfield but then I figured out all I have to do is ignore him…..So once you Understand, you can simply just move on and ignore this column if you dont like it.

ronald

December 8th, 2010
1:13 pm

Willie- We’ll never really be able to mass manufacture at an elite level, given the power that unions have in this country. So forget about big ticket items like auto and appliances.

Due to tranportation costs, we can still produce some types of agriculture cheaper here than it costs to ship it in from other countries. How long that will last is uncertain.

Instead of competing with Mexico and India for manufacturing jobs (who both have much cheaper labor than we do), we should focus on highly complex high-pay industries where a highly educated workforce is your strategic advantage. Silicon Valley is 1 example. Wall St is another example.

Kamchak

December 8th, 2010
1:13 pm

Keep

I missed his complete ban from Bookman. I would have have enjoyed that one.

It starts here a 1:03am and Jay responds at 1:25am

Proof positive that blogging and alcohol don’t mix in Swampy Nowhere Man’s case.

Nothing Is Free

December 8th, 2010
1:15 pm

Keep Up

- -Too bad even the simplest of statements is not true from Nonsense. Yes we may assemble tanks and F-22s in the US but not all of the parts are made in the US. But absolutely no proof that the “vast majority of costs of the wars go back into the US economy” and it ignores the drain on the US economy.- -

Your first sentence claims that what I say is not true . . . pretty definitive. But the rest of your para simply says that i have no proof of my statement, certainly not even approaching any sort of definitive proof that I had said anything that was untrue.

Is this what you learned in law school?

Keep up the good fight!

December 8th, 2010
1:17 pm

Kam… Thanks for the link!

Nothing Is Free

December 8th, 2010
1:18 pm

Kammy

You are lying. I posted on his blog for several weeks after that.

I was banned for pointing out that you and a couple of others were his attack dogs. Sorry I haven’t saved the link, but apparently, it is much more important to you than it is to me.

They BOTH suck

December 8th, 2010
1:18 pm

GT/MT

Wrong. I worked at a non union company that is the largest employer in Atlanta for 18 yrs. Sure you can guess the one.

After years of ups and downs due to overall industry and management issues, I decided to leave. Worked elsewhere for a few years now do contract and consulting.

But nice try.

My only point is that you along with others want to keep blaming the unions. I’m not absolving them, but when you look at ALL the outsourced jobs in the last 30 yrs, the union argument is a red herring. It DOES not account for most of the outsourcing, however it is a factor that should be taken into context with all outsourced jobs and the involved industries.

Not saying you don’t have a point, it is just ’slightly’ skewed in efforts to overshadow a much larger problem in terms of globalization.

Please dont take this as some defense of all Dem policies or knock on all Repub policies. We can argue policies all day. Both of us with open eyes should to a degree be able to agree on some issues while totally disagreeing on others. My point: This country is not going to move forward solely on some left wing or right wing paradigm of thinking. It will take bright minds and hard work from across the spectrum. I too at times get caught up in the left or right, but in the end that in itself isn’t going to solve most problems.

Williebkind

December 8th, 2010
1:19 pm

ronald

December 8th, 2010
1:13 pm
For the average American, it is easier to hit the lottery.

Why do you not demand a maximum salary given to wage earners of all businesses instead of taxing at higher rates. If an employer can afford to pay an elite group millions then that employer should lose all the tax deductions. The only deduction an employer should get is by hiring more employees. It is not just the corporations that do it. I have read anywhere in the constitution that said people should become muliti-millionaires.

Keep up the good fight!

December 8th, 2010
1:20 pm

Nonsense.. I know this is always hard for you being that you like to make things up and don’t understand simple thinks like secured mortgages…..The burden is on you to prove your nonsense. Simply saying tanks are assembled in the US is not proof of your statement. What I learned in law school is that bull crap does not stand up in a real court…and you are full of it.

AmVet

December 8th, 2010
1:21 pm

Kam, to your point at 1:13, some public meltdowns are more entertaining than others.

GT, an interesting take on labor unions being a part of the reason for corporate woes.

And that is clearly the case. Notwithstanding the immense good they have done in this country.

Yet union membership in the USA is now down to about 10% of total workers. Down form a number three to four times that in previous decades.

Also DoD contractors such as Boeing, Lockheed Martin and many, many others use union laborers, yet they have fantastic profits.

Things that make you go hmmm….

willie lynch

December 8th, 2010
1:22 pm

Mala Cori

December 8th, 2010
12:49 pm

I’ve always said if sense were “common” everyone would have it. That doesn’t seem to be the case.

I am not absolving the borrower of any fault I think it is a two way street but not everyone that borrowed was a new homeowner. I saw many people refinance homes that were magically worth more in a couple of months than they had been in the 15 years they had been making the payments. These people were fooled into believing they now had “equity” against which to borrow and were solicited on that basis by loan officers.

Yes we have to be smarter as consumers but in this instant gratification society how do you get people to go back to a non microwave mindset? Think about it, when your computer takes 30 sec. as opposed to 10 to respond we’re looking around like someone slapped us.

We’ve crossed a threshold and no one wants to give back any of what they’ve gained. The person driving the Mercedes doesn’t want to go back to driving a Honda and the person in the Honda doesn’t want to use public transportation. It will be a tough sell to get back to the good old days when excess wasn’t the rule.

Kamchak

December 8th, 2010
1:22 pm

We’ll never really be able to mass manufacture at an elite level, given the power that unions have in this country.

Oh puh-leeze. :roll:

Union membership in this country dropped from 36% in 1945 down to 12% in 2009, with the steepest decline beginning in the 1970s.

Find another dead horse to beat.

George W

December 8th, 2010
1:23 pm

Kamchak….until the union levels drop to 0% the manufacturing will not return.

Nothing Is Free

December 8th, 2010
1:23 pm

Keep up

You challenged my statement by saying that it is not true.

Prove that it is not true.

Or you could always whine some more and gossip with Kammy. I’m betting on the whining.

ronald

December 8th, 2010
1:24 pm

“If an employer can afford to pay an elite group millions then that employer should lose all the tax deductions.”

That is the most absurd thing I’ve read in a long, long time. Willie, the reason that some corporations can afford to pay some employees “millions” is because those employees are the ones responsible for the success of the company and they are the reason that the corporation has those millions to begin with.