It’s dumb to block smart kids from going to college, even if they’re here illegally

WASHINGTON — With Americans furious over illegal immigration — Democrats, independents, Republicans and tea partiers — there is little hope for comprehensive immigration reform this year. Incredibly, a majority supports Arizona’s ugly new law, which — no matter what its proponents say — begs for racial profiling.

The harsh political climate may begin to look a bit sunnier as the recession recedes and hiring picks up. In fact, there is room even now for leadership on the issue of illegal immigration.

While 58 percent of Americans support Arizona’s approach, 57 percent of the nation favors allowing undocumented workers a path to citizenship. Voters could probably be persuaded to support comprehensive immigration reform if Democratic leaders made a sustained push for it.

Until that happens, Congress ought to concentrate on a few small bills that would represent a modest improvement over the current reality for millions of those without papers — a life of living in the shadows, without legal protections, with continual fear of deportation and little chance for improved circumstances.

One of the best opportunities lies in the DREAM Act, which would allow promising undocumented students to start a path toward citizenship if they meet certain standards. The proposal — pushed for years by U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) — is intended to boost illegal immigrants who came to the U.S. as children, have finished high school and want to attend college or join the U.S. Armed Forces. The bill is a win not only for those students, but also for the country as a whole.

Much of the fury directed at illegal immigrants feeds off the notion that many of them are unfairly taking advantage of benefits that should be restricted to American citizens. However, that’s not the case with college; undocumented students are not displacing bona fide citizens who have been denied a seat in Calculus II.

In fact, the United States doesn’t have nearly enough students attending college. President Obama has talked again and again about the country’s decline in educational attainment: the U.S. used to the lead the world in the number of people with college degrees, but we’ve fallen behind.

Our declining educational attainment comes as a structural change in the labor force has made post-secondary education more necessary for middle-class wages. According to Georgetown University researchers, there will be more positions demanding a two-year degree than qualified applicants to fill them by the year 2018.

In that climate, we can hardly afford to obstruct ambitious, hardworking young people who want to attend college and join the great American mainstream. According to some estimates, 65,000 undocumented students graduate from U.S. high schools each year. Why not let them attend college or join the military and then attain permanent legal status?

The DREAM Act doesn’t attempt to determine whether students here illegally should be charged in-state tuition. State legislatures would still be free to charge them the higher out-of-state rate, if they chose.

Nor would the DREAM Act attract a steady stream of illegal border-crossers. It is narrowly tailored for students who entered the country before the age of 15 and have lived here continuously for at least five years.

The act, would, however stop cold the kind of narrow-minded natavism that has gripped Georgia Republicans. According to Atlanta Journal-Constitution columnist Jim Galloway, 14 GOP state senators have demanded that Georgia colleges and universities refuse to accept students without papers.

Georgia has prospered because it has imported college graduates from other states, and it still needs a better eductated workforce. It’s shameful that so many of its elected officials believe it’s critical to deprive students of the opportunity to get a degree just because they entered the country illegally years ago.

It is a sensible proposal that deals with a small part of the problem of illegal immigration. Neverthless, Sen. Durbin seems willing to allow the bill to languish until the Senate takes up comprehensive immigration reform, which seems unlikely this year.

That leaves undocumented achievers such as Jessica Colotl, a student at metro Atlanta’s Kennesaw State University, and Eric Balderas, who attends Harvard, to live with fear and uncertainty. It’s in their best interests to pass the DREAM Act soon — and in the country’s best interests, as well.

416 comments Add your comment

blutto

June 19th, 2010
11:47 am

Meanwhile, as we ponder the utility of providing college educations to those here illegally and while BP is accused by our Congress of Inquisitors of not paying claims fast enough, we learn today that the Glorious One’s Administration has a little claims backlog of their own.

From today’s AJC: “Victims of last year’s floods waiting for buyouts from their local governments will have to wait a little longer until federal lawmakers release about $30 million into a disaster relief fund. The funds cannot be released until Congress approves a new appropriations bill for the Federal Emergency Management Agency and it is signed by the president. Terry Lunn, director of the Georgia Emergency Management Agency’s Hazard Mitigation Department, said there is no way of telling when that might happen.

The freeze is stalling buyouts for 119 area properties. In January, local officials submitted applications for FEMA money to buy substantially damaged homes located within the area’s 100-year flood plain.”

GREAT JOB, BARRY!

jkim

June 19th, 2010
11:48 am

Rick:

Your ranting is difficult to understand. I was simply clarifying the facts in response to a previous post. I have no issue with people going back to apply for legal status if there is a fair penalty and shot of returning. As I stated before this is currently not the case. When people say “go back to your country, apply, wait in line” current feasibility of this under existing laws should be considered.

Vast Right Wing Conspiracy

June 19th, 2010
11:48 am

AZ law mimics unenforced fed law. Declining college attendance by US citizens is a direct product of our dumbed-down public school system – the Dear Leader and his ilk desire a more compliant citizenry. The Dear Leader does need more voters – Democrats tend to abort themselves out of existence much quicker than Republicans. He will have to act quickly before November. One problem for him – many of his cherished future voters are no longer in the country – they have left in search of greener pastures. Is Obamacare enough to get them to come back into the country? Time will tell. The Dear Leader really has no interest in the economy coming back – a down economy creates too many opportunities for him.

Rick

June 19th, 2010
11:49 am

Gator Joe June 19th, 2010 11:34 am states:

“Of course making access to higher education easier, to anyone, undocumented or otherwise, makes sense, long term it benefits the society as whole, here in GA and elsewhere in the US.”
===========================
Please support your contention that we need to subsidize higher education to foreign nationals in our country illegally.

In what high skilled fields do we need additional workers to supplement labor provided by US citizens and legal residents?

If you can identify high skilled fields that needs these additional workers shouldn’t we limit higher education to those fields? We certainly don’t need any more students studying political science or hispanic studies!

Weren’t liberals advancing the notion that illegal aliens should be allowed to stay because we needed more potty cleaners and bean pickers?

What percentage of the illegal alien population would qualify for this higher education benefit?

Sarah Palin

June 19th, 2010
11:50 am

I shoot ilk from my helicopter.

Bill

June 19th, 2010
11:52 am

What if a smart person has committed a felony in this country? Should we say it is silly to send them to jail instead of sending them to college?

Being in the country illegally is – by definition – committing a crime. Why are we allowing it? Why should we support it?

Rick

June 19th, 2010
11:52 am

jkim June 19th, 2010 11:48 am

Rick:

Your ranting is difficult to understand. I was simply clarifying the facts in response to a previous post. I have no issue with people going back to apply for legal status if there is a fair penalty and shot of returning. As I stated before this is currently not the case. When people say “go back to your country, apply, wait in line” current feasibility of this under existing laws should be considered.
==================
Jkim: as I stated, it was their decision to enter the US illegally. Why do our immigration laws have to benefit the illegal alien population?

Make your case and then justify why Mexico treats its illegal alien population so badly. Shouldn’t your argument apply equally to Mexico and other Central and South American countries?

Sethe

June 19th, 2010
11:58 am

@Kamchak

Pearl clutching? Surely you jest.

Obviously you have some reason to support “illegal immigration.”

Perhaps, you’re one of the big biz guys who hires them and makes gobs of money under the table- or maybe you are one.

I know of very few American citizens who enjoy paying the health benefits, education and God knows what else for people who are breaking the law.

Either way, the people who enter this country ILLEGALLY are breaking laws.

Does that mean that I, as an American citizen, can break laws too without fear of repercussions?

Please enlighten me and inform me why it is ok for these people to break OUR laws. I bet if I headed to their country of origin and broke a couple of laws that I’d be thrown in jail.

A CONSERVATIVE

June 19th, 2010
12:03 pm

CYNTHIA……Remain silent..so people will not know just how DUMB you really…really are..

jkim

June 19th, 2010
12:05 pm

Rick:

For your information, I am not Hispanic and neither is the entire immigrant population, legal or illegal. You are correct, the idea is to advance the debate so it benefits everyone in the US. I personally believe supporting a policy that merely decides to kick out 11 million people without regard to each individual case is inhumane as well as impractical. Now, you don’t have to agree with me but surely there are answers outside of lumping 11 million together as the worst of the human kind.

Rick

June 19th, 2010
12:08 pm

gator joe,
It is your open mindness, thinking that we should, feed, clothe and educate the entire world, on our dime that is running this country broke. Why don’t you join CT and put up your own money and start a private college for ILLEGALS.

blutto

June 19th, 2010
12:09 pm

Gator Joe: “Of course making access to higher education easier, to anyone, undocumented or otherwise, makes sense, long term it benefits the society as whole, here in GA and elsewhere in the US.”

The university educated terrorists certainly would agree. From the UK’s Centre for Social Cohesion: “… a significant number of people convicted of terror offenses or killed in the commission of those offenses are university students or graduates.

In fact, the … non-partisan think-tank (notes that) 26.2 percent of those involved in Islamist related terrorism convictions and attacks between 1999 and 2009 in the U.K. were educated at or above university-degree level.”

jkim

June 19th, 2010
12:12 pm

blutto:

so now your logic is Universities produce terrorists? Where are you going with this?

Timus

June 19th, 2010
12:13 pm

The odds that they will become taxpaying, law abiding citizens is far greater if you let them finish school. Deportation just adds to the number of people who will sneak back in and NOT pay taxes. I know it seems unfair but you have to look at the bigger picture.

Kamchak

June 19th, 2010
12:13 pm

Obviously you have some reason to support “illegal immigration.”

Nope. Time to return that crystal ball back to the magic shop where you purchased it sport, for it is clearly defective

Perhaps, you’re one of the big biz guys who hires them and makes gobs of money under the table- or maybe you are one.

Nope, just a carpenter that has been in the construction biz for thirty years that has seen the influx of cheap labor that flooded the market keeping my sub-contracting price down. And no, I have never hired an illegal to work for me.

My question is why now? This is an issue that obviously has your thong in a twist, so why has it taken so long for you to find your voice?

Either way, the people who enter this country ILLEGALLY are breaking laws.

And the people that hire them are equally guilty of breaking laws, yet your pie-hole seems strangely silent on that issue.

Does that mean that I, as an American citizen, can break laws too without fear of repercussions?

No.

Please enlighten me and inform me why it is ok for these people to break OUR laws.

Please enlighten and inform me where I said that it was OK.

Scout

June 19th, 2010
12:17 pm

Folks …………. let’s have good debate here and not call the “threadmaster” names. Nothing accomplished in that.

Rick

June 19th, 2010
12:18 pm

jkim June 19th, 2010 12:05 pm Rick:

For your information, I am not Hispanic and neither is the entire immigrant population, legal or illegal. You are correct, the idea is to advance the debate so it benefits everyone in the US. I personally believe supporting a policy that merely decides to kick out 11 million people without regard to each individual case is inhumane as well as impractical. Now, you don’t have to agree with me but surely there are answers outside of lumping 11 million together as the worst of the human kind.
=================
Jkim:
I didn’t say you were Hispanic. I did say that the illegal alien population is predominantly Hispanic!

I believe that we need to treat each foreign national applying for US citizenship EQUALLY! That would be treating each one individually to see what they could contribute to the US economy and choosing those that BENEFIT the US economy.

I don’t believe that we should allow illegal aliens who can simply walk across the border to “JUMP THE LINE” while other foreign nationals wait patiently in their home countries. Why should the US immigration system REWARD those who break our laws?

I didn’t say they were the WORST OF HUMANKIND! I am saying that they expect to take advantage of entering the US illegally while other foreign nationals wanting US citizenship RESPECT our laws and wait in the homeland.

Why should US taxpayers be supporting or even ALLOWING foreign nationals in our country illegally?

Do you not respect our immigration laws? Do you advocate for OPEN BORDERS? If not, then as a soveriegn nation the US has every right to enforce their immigration laws and immigration should BENEFIT THE US and its lawful citizens.

I believe that it is more humane to admit starving people in Africa than Mexican citizens. Mexicans may be poor, but they are in much better shape that many African nations. Besides, the overwhelming consideration for US immigration policy is whether or not it benefits the US economy.

blutto

June 19th, 2010
12:23 pm

jkim: “… your logic is Universities produce terrorists?”

Did you read my post and the one to which I responded? Gator wrote that “… making access to higher education easier, to anyone, undocumented or otherwise, makes sense, long term it benefits the society as whole….”

My point is that “making access to higher education easier to ANYONE, UNDOCUMENTED OR OTHERWISE” not only does not “make sense,” it also does not necessarily benefit “society as a whole”, except in the minds of those who think that the urban renewal necessitated by terrorist bombings is a good thing.

Now, is it your position that terrorists do not attend universities or that no university educated persons become terrorists?

jkim

June 19th, 2010
12:25 pm

I believe that we need to treat each foreign national applying for US citizenship EQUALLY! That would be treating each one individually to see what they could contribute to the US economy and choosing those that BENEFIT the US economy.

Rick:

I am in agreement that there should not be open borders and that future illegal migrant flow must be stopped once and for all. What would you do with the 11 million already here? Would you deport them all regardless of their individual situation or would your comment above apply to them so they can present their individual case for staying?

BenFranklin

June 19th, 2010
12:25 pm

We already have a legal process. There are many foreign students here on student visas. There are foreign workers here on work permits and green cards. How is it fair to them that they go through the CURRENT LEGAL process to become students, workers, and/or citizens? They pay a lot of money and file a lot of paperwork to be here legally. I should know. My wife just completed the process to become a citizen. Illegal aliens get NO sympathy in my house.
If these kids want to go to college, they can go back to their country of origin and do it the LEGAL way. Of course they would have to pay out-of-state tuition, which is probably their biggest fear.

Joe

June 19th, 2010
12:28 pm

Cindy- your comments are moronic. Your arguement, which I also heard on the national news, is that police officers are chomping at the bit to arrest everyone hoping to catch an illegal. I will trust your two brain cells will click for you this weekend.

blutto

June 19th, 2010
12:29 pm

Kamchak: “… the people that hire them are equally guilty of breaking laws….”

Agreed and I would contend that the threat to actually enforce the law against such hiring, followed by a few prominent examples, would for the most part solve any illegal alien problems. So why does the Obama Administration not enforce the law?

dahreese

June 19th, 2010
12:30 pm

Ms. Tucker, the issue is bigger than racial profiling. There is also the ability of this country (as well as the willingness) to handle millions of illegals (by whatever ethnic persuasion) on our roads, our hospitals, our schools, our infrastructure in general. There is also the serious issue of the physical health of the country – those who enter illegally without proper immunizations, for example.

Yes, “a mind is an awful thing to waste”, but there has to be a line somewhere.

Thanks for all the good that you do.

jkim

June 19th, 2010
12:30 pm

My point is that “making access to higher education easier to ANYONE, UNDOCUMENTED OR OTHERWISE” not only does not “make sense,” it also does not necessarily benefit “society as a whole”,

blutto:

I understand the point you are trying to make but I still don’t understand how your previous post about terrorists supports your argument above. It simply refers to me as “some terrorists attend universities” which has no significant correlation.

Kamchak

June 19th, 2010
12:33 pm

Joe

June 19th, 2010
9:44 am

This article is not even worth my comment. The stupidity is blinding…

Joe

June 19th, 2010
12:28 pm

Cindy- your comments are moronic. Your arguement[sic], which I also heard on the national news, is that police officers are chomping at the bit to arrest everyone hoping to catch an illegal. I will trust your two brain cells will click for you this weekend.

Sixth comment…

UsmcDawg

June 19th, 2010
12:35 pm

No Cynthia. It is Dumb to be intellectually dishonest-like you are- and not acknowledge the difference between “right & wrong”. Kick these ILLEGAL people out of our country. They BROKE the law and should not benefit.
You are so dishonest!

Sethe

June 19th, 2010
12:35 pm

@Kamchak

You obviously missed my point by several light years.

Ever since I became aware of the burgeoning numbers of illegals in the country and the FACT that our country is supporting them- I’ve been upset about it. Our country has plenty of people who need assistance- why not start at home?

Can you honestly convince yourself that any other country would allow what we as a country are doing now?

My “pie hole” was not intentionally silent. I do not agree with people hiring illegals just to make a buck. That was mentioned in one of my earlier posts. In my book, it is unethical to take advantage of any people in sticky situations (being here illegally) and there have been quite a few people practicing this illegal act.

They should be jailed/fined too.

From the tone of your earlier posts, you seem to support “illegal immigration”- which, in my mind, constitutes law breaking.

Ah, the joys of venting on a Saturday afternoon.

mottbish

June 19th, 2010
12:38 pm

Of the oft statistics reporting all of the illegal alien crime from CaPolitical News; far as I can tell they are made up, a fiction, lies. Taken directly from the FBI crime stats:

“Among the four categories of race reflected in UCR arrest data, 69.7 percent of persons arrested were white, 58.5 percent of persons arrested for violent crime were white, and 68.2 percent of persons arrested for property crime were white.”

And I thought all crime in the US was from illegals. Who’d of thunk?

Sethe

June 19th, 2010
12:39 pm

The issue of legality, in terms of citizenship, is obviously a hot button.

Instead of B&M-ing about it- what can we do to change it?

Kamchak

June 19th, 2010
12:41 pm

Agreed and I would contend that the threat to actually enforce the law against such hiring, followed by a few prominent examples, would for the most part solve any illegal alien problems.

Because the only punishment meted out are fines. Unless and until employers are forced to do the perp walk to prison, paying fines is still cheaper than hiring U.S. citizens.

BTW, our hostess has written an op-ed piece advocating this very thing some 2 or 3 years ago, but as it was before she started this blog, I don’t know if it is archived in the musty basement of the AJC’s files.

So why does the Obama Administration not enforce the law?

Dunno. Why didn’t Reagan, Bush Sr., Clinton, or Bush Jr.?

Rick

June 19th, 2010
12:43 pm

jkim

June 19th, 2010
12:25 pm
I believe that we need to treat each foreign national applying for US citizenship EQUALLY! That would be treating each one individually to see what they could contribute to the US economy and choosing those that BENEFIT the US economy.

Rick:

I am in agreement that there should not be open borders and that future illegal migrant flow must be stopped once and for all. What would you do with the 11 million already here? Would you deport them all regardless of their individual situation or would your comment above apply to them so they can present their individual case for staying?
======================
Jkim: I want all foreign nationals to be treated EQUALLY! That means that all foreign nationals should be evaluated for US citizenship while they WAIT IN THEIR HOME COUNTRIES!

Would allowing those here illegally to stay while others wait in the home countries be treating all foriegn nationals EQUALLY?

I’ll answer that for you. Of course it would not be equal treatment! Therefore all illegal aliens must return to their home countries before they are put on a path to US citizenship.

joan

June 19th, 2010
12:44 pm

You are all missing the point. A lot of illegals have social security numbers. They are not their own of course. And yes, I stand by my “throw them out”. Look what being tolerant has done for Europe. Did you see the muslims spitting on English soldiers just back from Iraq. Let’s be tolerant until we are totally drained dry, and spat upon. If you believe the Mexicans or the muslims will treat Americans nearly as decently as we have treated them you are just putting your head in the sand.

Scout

June 19th, 2010
12:48 pm

Joan:

“Remember the Alamo” !!

blutto

June 19th, 2010
12:56 pm

jkim: “… some terrorists attend universities” which has no significant correlation.”

I agree. Mine was not an attempt to establish a correlation between university attendance and terrorism. Rather it was an attempt to show that the higher education of some does not necessarily “benefit society as a whole” as Gator Joe maintained.

Sethe

June 19th, 2010
1:01 pm

“You are all missing the point. A lot of illegals have social security numbers. They are not their own of course. And yes, I stand by my “throw them out”. Look what being tolerant has done for Europe. Did you see the muslims spitting on English soldiers just back from Iraq. Let’s be tolerant until we are totally drained dry, and spat upon. If you believe the Mexicans or the muslims will treat Americans nearly as decently as we have treated them you are just putting your head in the sand.”

Joan-

I think there are several people here who have similar sentiments.

It is unfortunate that there are people housed in this country illegally who profit from the swelled government teat (I didn’t even mention the U.S. citizens who do it- we’re just as guilty). And there probably are a few illegal immigrants who are decent and hardworking, i.e. they don’t follow the stereotype of gun-toting criminals… however, they’re still breaking the law.

I remember reading somewhere that, in their minds, they don’t comprehend how they’re breaking the law. They see free medical care, schools, cheap housing, employment- all of the opportunities they apparently do not have in their countries of origin. Yes, I can sympathize, but I do not condone breaking the U.S. law just because you had a hard life before coming to the U.S.

I’m all about treating people fairly. Unfortunately, a lot of the opposition to illegal deportation views the “deporters” as fascists, racists, etc. which makes it hard to have any semblance of a rational conversation.

I may have misinterpreted a few statements earlier and my apologies for that.

I do stand by enforcing the U.S. immigration laws (and all other laws).

My question still remains unanswered: Why are so many people against it?- and what can we do to change the situation?

blutto

June 19th, 2010
1:01 pm

Kamchak: “Why didn’t Reagan, Bush Sr., Clinton, or Bush Jr.?”

I “dunno” either. But the current president has the power now and the former ones do not. Both responsibility and authority now belong to him.

Scout

June 19th, 2010
1:05 pm

Kamchak:

If you remember, I used to rake Bush W. over the coals for that. It was one of my biggest disappointments in him ………….. that and his allowing Rumsfield to run loose over the generals.

I call ‘em like I see ‘em.

Now it’s Obama’s turn …………..

Eric

June 19th, 2010
1:17 pm

“When plunder becomes a way of life for a group of men living together in society, they create for themselves in the course of time a legal system that authorizes it and a moral code that justifies it.”

Frederic Bastiat

Kamchak

June 19th, 2010
1:58 pm

My question still remains unanswered: Why are so many people against it?- and what can we do to change the situation?

As does mine—why is it, 24 years after Reagan’s amnesty, are people only now doing the couch fainting thing?

mmm, mmm, mmm, Barack the LIAR Obama - BEND OVER, Here comes the CHANGE!

June 19th, 2010
2:02 pm

Back to the ultra liberal leanings I see. If they are here ILLEGALLY they are breaking a law. Why should taxpayers fund/reward them? Cynthia it’s time for more of that LA Gulf kool aide, enjoy!

Kamchak

June 19th, 2010
2:03 pm

But the current president has the power now and the former ones do not. Both responsibility and authority now belong to him.

Yep– and you are taking him to task for it, yet letting the others skate for 24 years.

mmm, mmm, mmm, Barack the LIAR Obama - BEND OVER, Here comes the CHANGE!

June 19th, 2010
2:06 pm

Kamchak – skate or not, there’s nothing the past Presidents can do now.
Yet, the LIAR in Chief can. That is if he had the balls.

Sethe

June 19th, 2010
2:08 pm

“My question still remains unanswered: Why are so many people against it?- and what can we do to change the situation?

As does mine—why is it, 24 years after Reagan’s amnesty, are people only now doing the couch fainting thing?”

I don’t know the answer to that one. Well, I think the media has a hand in it. If it doesn’t generate viewers, then it’s not on the news. I think that, at the time, many people were ignorant of the event or of its ramifications. Back in the 80’s people were too preoccupied with the end of the cold war and MTV.

Now, in the year 2010, to say that “illegal immigration” is a hot topic is like saying, “Gee. The sky is blue.”

I think that 9 out of 10 people hold some strong emotions regarding the topic. Its made the news. People know about it and now some people are directly affected by it.

I also believe that in this decade more people are profiting from it… take for example news journalists.

Kamchak

June 19th, 2010
2:24 pm

Cynthia it’s time for more of that LA Gulf kool aide…

I think that to “level the playing field,” we’ll have to “cast a wider net,” but “the scenery only changes for the lead dog.” I say we “run it up the flagpole and see who salutes it,” but it may be “like putting lipstick on a pig.” “At the end of the day,” and if “we have the bandwidth,” we should “take it to the next level” with “seamless integration.” It’s time to “think outside the box,” and while that may be “directionally correct,” “the bottom line is, I’m “in the trenches with you.” “The way forward is” always “where the rubber meets the road,” and “rule number one is: don’t tease the panther.”

Kamchak

June 19th, 2010
2:31 pm

…skate or not, there’s nothing the past Presidents can do now.

Ah yes, the ol’ crap-all-over-everything-for-the-past-24-years-then-complain-about-the-clean-up strategy.

How’s that personal responsibility thingie goin’ for ya.

You betcha! :wink:

T-Town

June 19th, 2010
2:36 pm

Ahhh Mr. Kamchak, I see we’re as condescending as ever. So “sport” I know your “not here to entertain me” as I may be your “leg humpper,” but if you’d like to tell me to “fyt” I’ll do my best. Now for the last 24 years of the same ole crap, those guys were very bad men. Feel better now?

Kamchak

June 19th, 2010
2:42 pm

Now for the last 24 years of the same ole crap, those guys were very bad men. Feel better now?

You’re a day late and a dollar short.

T-Town

June 19th, 2010
2:48 pm

Nope, I’ve been bitching about our elected officials since JFK. Was young and full of myself with Eisenhower. Politicians are brought and paid for, then we elect them. Can’t cry and try to change the past, can only worry about the future.

killerJ

June 19th, 2010
2:53 pm

you aint lost your job yet?

Georgian

June 19th, 2010
3:20 pm

Thank you Cynthia. Again, it is not a matter of IF immigration reform will happen, but a simple matter of WHEN. We should be encouraged by the sheer determination and talent that these students have overcome and still manage to succeed and earn their way into colleges and universities. Thank you for pointing this out. What we need in this country is a more educated labor pool and these students represent the best of us. Yes, the DREAM Act should be passed too.