Pentagon was right to withdraw Franklin Graham’s invitation to speak

I had the pleasure of sitting next to Billy Graham at a small luncheon once, years ago, and I genuinely enjoyed our table chit-chat. By then, I had come to admire and respect the man who did nothing to sully the term “tele-vangelist.”

His theological views represent a more traditional/conservative set of beliefs than I’m comfortable with; nevertheless, he gets the heart of real Christianity. He opposed segregation back in the 1960s. And he’s never been one to attack the religious beliefs of others.

His son, Franklin, unfortunately, is a different sort. His vehement attacks on Islam are the result of both ignorance and prejudice, betraying a narrowmindedness that only inflame tensions between Muslims and Christians.

As just one example, he has said:

We’re not attacking Islam but Islam has attacked us. The God of Islam is not the same God. He’s not the son of God of the Christian or Judeo-Christian faith. It’s a different God, and I believe it [Islam] is a very evil and wicked religion.

Only about one percent of the troops in the US military are practicing Muslims, according to Pentagon figures, but they are, by all accounts, loyal to their country and willing to put their lives on the line, just like all others. (Some have died. Take a look at the photo below.

Elsheba Khan visits her son's grave, Platon

Elsheba Khan visits her son's grave, Platon

) There is no place at a National Prayer Day service for someone who smears their religion.

Former President George W. Bush worked to make a distinction between the jihadists who want to destroy us and the law-abiding Muslims who are loyal Americans. But his administration allowed men like Lt. General William Boykin, who also insulted Islam, to hold high-ranking positions in the Pentagon. That’s unfortunate — some SecDef Gates is working to avoid.

323 comments Add your comment

Granny Godzilla

April 23rd, 2010
8:05 am

I don’t think very highly of Franklin.

Franklin Graham’s CEO pay draws experts’ criticism

The Pentagon did the right thing.

Peadawg

April 23rd, 2010
8:07 am

Granny, your link doesn’t work. You get a Page Not Found (404) when you click on your link. Nice try though..trying to hip and post cool links like that. :)

SouthernGal

April 23rd, 2010
8:08 am

All references to God, religion, all prayers and religious accomodations should be banned at all government workplaces.

Some Guy

April 23rd, 2010
8:13 am

The attitude of the Army still seems to be the same political correctness that protected Maj. Nadal Hassan. We all know what atrocities he committed in the name of Islam at Ft. Hood. My some accounts Maj. Hassan had been unfit for duty for several years but was protected by political correctness. A political correctness that scared Maj. Hassan’s superiors and colleague not to report him because of the fear that their actions would be seen as prejudiced. This attitude still permeates not only at the Army but the DOD with their inability to give a full reporting of what occurred with Maj. Hassan and his atrocities at Ft. Hood.

Let’s be honest, who is committing the majority of terrorist acts in the world today. What is their major influence? Islam. I know all muslims are not terrorists but there something terribly wrong with a religion when your followers are responsible for the majority of terrorism in the world.

I do not remember CT blogging about Ft. Hood and Maj Hassan. I bet she would never say anything bad about islam because they have a history of threatening and killing those in the media that oppose them. It is easier for CT to critical of the military as the are considered conservative and all things conservative in CT’s eyes are evil.

Granny Godzilla

April 23rd, 2010
8:15 am

Peadawg

April 23rd, 2010
8:16 am

“they have a history of threatening and killing those in the media that oppose them”

Like the creators of South Park? That show makes fun of everything and everybody. Yet only the Muslims are threatening them.

The Voice of Raisin

April 23rd, 2010
8:22 am

betraying a narrowmindedness that only inflame tensions between Muslims and Christians.

So basically you are saying if he’s not politcally correct you don’t want him around

I see.

There are some of us who are willing to refuse to bow to political correctness, accept that there actually is evil in the the world, and behave accordingly.

TnGelding

April 23rd, 2010
8:22 am

Franklin is just a true-believer doing what he has taken an oath to do. All religion is an invention of man in search for an explanation for our existence. The National Prayer Day service should be canceled and discontinued.

Peadawg

April 23rd, 2010
8:25 am

“The National Prayer Day service should be canceled and discontinued.”

Why? If you don’t want to participate, don’t. It’s not specific to one religion. All, if not most, religions pray. It’s a day for all religions. What’s your problem with it exactly?

Granny Godzilla

April 23rd, 2010
8:26 am

Some Guy

Yes, there is something terribly wrong with a religion when it’s followers are guilty of terrorism.

Think Inquisition, Castrati, Witch Trials, Olympic Park Bombing,
the IRA and the Ulster Freedom Fighters, Oklahoma City, Birmingham Church Bombings…..More here

TnGelding

April 23rd, 2010
8:28 am

Granny Godzilla

April 23rd, 2010
8:15 am

Work for “free” when he is 70? Good grief! How much money does one servant of God need? I guess he needs to be able to lead a life he became accustomed to as a child. I always liked his father, tho, and enjoy watching his old sermons.

Scout

April 23rd, 2010
8:31 am

Cynthia:

Just so you know, Jesus would be “disinvited” from praying at the Pentagon also:

“I am the way the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father but through Me.”

In effect, He “was” disinvited ………………..

How far our country has fallen ……………

Granny Godzilla

April 23rd, 2010
8:33 am

Scout

Piffle

Jeanette

April 23rd, 2010
8:33 am

It is so wrong to withdray his invitation. I don’t believe the National Day of Prayer started for everyone to just pray to anything. We know why it was started. If the US continues to go in the direction that it is going, it will be too late. I believe God has blessed this country because we have in the most part beena Christian nation. But unfortunately that is changing. By the way The Graham organization has help and they still are helping many people, even Muslims, in other countries. Does that happen in the other direction?!?!?! Whatever the case, we better all be praying for God to be with us.

Some Guy

April 23rd, 2010
8:34 am

Granny Godzilla,

You give me a link to the SPLC…………Geez. You might as well have given me a link to the Huffington Post or the Daily Kos I grew up in Montgomery, AL I know all about the SPLC since that is where they are HQ’ed. Sure they do some good work but they are really tilted to track what they considered right wing extremist. They are a truly biased group. But I bet you think tea partyer’s rascists too. The SPLC does. BTW I am not one.

Granny Godzilla

April 23rd, 2010
8:37 am

Some Guy

Ok, I get you have an issue with the SPLC, but you don’t seem to deny
that there have been acts of religious terrorism.

Granny Godzilla

April 23rd, 2010
8:38 am

Some Guy

The sentence should end….from “Christians”.

TnGelding

April 23rd, 2010
8:38 am

Peadawg

April 23rd, 2010
8:25 am

Basically it’s sorcery.

What about those that don’t believe in prayer?

For best results pray in the privacy of a closet.

Matthew 6:5-6: “And when thou prayest, thou shalt not be as the hypocrites are: for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and in the corners of the streets, that they may be seen of men….when thou prayest, enter into thy closet and when thou has shut thy door, pray to thy Father which is in secret.

Certainly there is no harm in joining together in fellowship but it would appear that Mr. Graham’s intolerance would not permit him to do so.

Bubba

April 23rd, 2010
8:40 am

“But his administration allowed men like Lt. General William Boykin, who also insulted Islam, to hold high-ranking positions in the Pentagon.”

By all means, let’s appoint our generals based on their religious sensitivity, not their competence.

Granny Godzilla

April 23rd, 2010
8:42 am

Bubba

Competence in generals (and all others in fact) should include religious
sensitivity.

Peadawg

April 23rd, 2010
8:48 am

“What about those that don’t believe in prayer?”

Just like if they don’t believe in Easter, Christmas, Hanukkah, Halloween, etc. Don’t participate.

“but it would appear that Mr. Graham’s intolerance would not permit him to do so.”

I agree he’s out there. But there’s nothing wrong with a National Day of Prayer.

Bubba

April 23rd, 2010
8:49 am

Granny, can you provide a reliable source that McVeigh was a Christian? I believe he was quoted as saying he was an agnostic.

Peadawg

April 23rd, 2010
8:50 am

“Basically it’s sorcery.”

National Day of Prayer is the use of power gained from the assistance or control of evil spirits especially for divining? Really? Wow, you went waaaaaaaaay out on a limb on that one lmao.

Bubba

April 23rd, 2010
8:52 am

Granny Godzilla

April 23rd, 2010
8:42 am
Competence in generals (and all others in fact) should include religious
sensitivity.

I guess that would have eliminated Gen. Patton … and probably led to a German victory in Europe. But, at least we would have had a friendly general in his place.

Robert

April 23rd, 2010
8:54 am

I don’t know folks- separate of church and state is vital. One day we could actually have a Muslim Pres and who know- all heck could break out.

TnGelding

April 23rd, 2010
8:56 am

Bubba

April 23rd, 2010
8:52 am

We’ve gone from the U.S. winning the war all by itself to General Patton being given all the credit. I guess the millions of dead Russians and other allies died in vain.

Drawing Black Lines

April 23rd, 2010
8:58 am

CT – As someone who drastically disagrees with you most of the time, I have to agree with you on this one. The separation of church and state is one of the main reasons I don’t align myself with Republicans (Although I don’t define myself as a true democrat either). Clearly, beyond a shadow of a doubt, there is a wall of separation between Church and State. I don’t want the Governments hands in the collection plate or the decisions of any church – which is the naturally corollary to having the church being in bed with the government. As a Christian, I’m embarrassed when I hear others say things like”The government kicked God out of school,” simply because there is no sanctioned Judeo-Christian Prayer. In my opinion, nobody kicks God anywhere and kids can pray in school if they want, to themselves in private. Thomas Jefferson was, in fact a deist, a fact that most evangelicals refute. It amazes me that conservative evangelicals don’t see the dichotomy with there viewpont that the U.S. should be or was a theocracy while at the same time having opposition to muslim countries who practice a theocracy. Bottom line. Its unfortunate to have people say they believe in God and then malign others who practice a different religion due to a fringe element…Christianity is familiar with this particularly with the KKK, the Branch Davidians and other movements that have used terror in the name of God. End Rant

TnGelding

April 23rd, 2010
8:58 am

Robert

April 23rd, 2010
8:54 am

Some would say we have one now. Religion is a private matter and has no place in public gatherings.

Ragnar Danneskjöld

April 23rd, 2010
9:02 am

I think I heard some democrat judge proclaimed the National Day of Prayer unconstitutional. Under such a circumstance why would it matter if Chauncey’s minions excluded a Christian or two?

Robert

April 23rd, 2010
9:02 am

DBL- good rant. I had the unique opportunity of growing up in one of the first mega churches. Baker, Falwell, and Lehay were frequent guest speakers. I also greatly enjoyed God and Country days with Pat Swindall. Any way- the new preacher headed to Cumming when the Dekalb County cash was drying up and the church wouldn’t go for a helicoptor to chopper him hack and forth between his new love. Anyways, CT CT CT (wanted to grab your attention) thank you for paying respect to Dad Graham as he is first class.

Granny Godzilla

April 23rd, 2010
9:02 am

Bubba

That’s just plain goofy. Patton was a good Epicopalian, you’ll have to show us an example of his relgious intolerance.

McViegh:

Time Magazine 2001

Time: Are you religious?

McVeigh: I was raised Catholic. I was confirmed Catholic (received the sacrament of confirmation). Through my military years, I sort of lost touch with the religion. I never really picked it up, however I do maintain core beliefs.

Time: Do you believe in God?

McVeigh: I do believe in a God, yes. But that’s as far as I want to discuss. If I get too detailed on some things that are personal like that, it gives people an easier way [to] alienate themselves from me and that’s all they are looking for now.

Ragnar Danneskjöld

April 23rd, 2010
9:04 am

Dear Granny and Bubba, re: Generals who insult Islam, the only competent advice I have heard on the subject came from Ann Coulter, in her suggestion of what our goals should be there.

Peter

April 23rd, 2010
9:09 am

You can say a lot about Franklyn Graham, but ignorant he is not. Most Christians, and even Muslims for that matter, do not understand what Islam is about. What is the true agenda? If there is one thing I do know, Franklyn Graham knows exactly what it is about. A man of faith cannot say what is politically correct, and the Muslims themselves will tell you that. They are quite outspoken about what they believe. One thing is for sure, do not tell a devout Muslim that Islam and Christianity have the same beliefs, because by definition they would not agree. These are different belief systems.

Granny Godzilla

April 23rd, 2010
9:11 am

Ragnar

competent advice from Ann Coulter is an oxymoron.

kool$kat

April 23rd, 2010
9:11 am

Franklin Graham is a Christian. Which means he believes the Bible. Which says that Jesus Christ is the only way to Heaven, salvation, God. So what is he supposed to say to Muslims? Same thing he says to everyone. I hope you will accept Jesus Christ as your Savior.
According to the Bible, any other god or other way to reach God is invalid and wrong. Therefore anything that leads people away from God is evil.
If the Army isn’t comfortable with that message, then they are right to rescind the invitation. But rather than offend 1% (the Muslim soldiers); they are offending whatever percentage of soldiers are Christian. Which I’m sure is much more than 1%!
You want everyone to be all inclusive, but that is offensive to Christians, who believe that Jesus is the Way, the Truth, and the Life. And that no man comes to the Father (God) but by Him.
Anyone who professes to be Christian, but thinks other religions are acceptable (like Barack Obama, for example) is not a Christian.
Furthermore, Christians are compelled by Jesus to share his Gospel with everyone. Not to remain silent. To do so is to allow non-believers to miss Heaven, to allow them to spend eternity in Hell. That would be like knowing the bridge around the curve is out, but standing beside the road and smiling as people drive around the curve and plunge to their deaths.

Bubba

April 23rd, 2010
9:15 am

“To me it seems certain that the fatalistic teachings of Muhammad and the utter degradation of women is the outstanding cause for the arrested development of the Arab. He is exactly as he was around the year 700, while we have kept on developing” — Gen. George Patton

Keep up the good fight!

April 23rd, 2010
9:16 am

Hey some guy? Who is committing the terrorist attrocties in the world? Christianity! Hmmm shall we go down the list of Michigan militia, medical doctors performing lawful acts threatened and killed, Our children molested and protected by the church. Haitians deserve death and more because they “made a deal with the devil” Shall we go over the history of Christianity? It is absurd to blame all of Islam for some radicals just as Christianity is not defined by some so-called Christians and of course as many have argued, the Tea Party is not defined by some radicals who support their ideas.

Pead…try separation of state and religion…..but then dont let the consitution get in your way or the many Supreme Court decisions.

Byron Mathison Kerr

April 23rd, 2010
9:16 am

‘No thanks’ to people like Franklin Graham, many people don’t even realize that the God of Islam is the God of Abraham — the same God of Judaism and Christianity.

The Voice of Raisin

April 23rd, 2010
9:16 am

Will you atheists and insecure ant-religious people please spare us all your bullshít!

That is all.

Carry on.

Reality

April 23rd, 2010
9:17 am

Wow!

Is it so hard for some of you to understand that ANY religon (yes, even Christianity) was be warped to have cause to go to war? This even applies to Islam. Have you forgotten all of the wars fought in the “name of Chrisitanity?”

It isn’t the religon that is bad, it is the people that twist religous views to support their views that are bad.

Wow – understanding that kinda makes be better understand republicans….. LOL!

The Voice of Raisin

April 23rd, 2010
9:18 am

Keep up the good fight!

You mean keep up the rant.

Some Guy

April 23rd, 2010
9:18 am

Granny Godzilla,

You are really stretching with what you consider “Christian” terrorism. Witch trails in 1600’s MA? Let’s go back to the Grand Inquistion in Spain too. Timothy McVeigh was an anti-govt militia type. The bombings in Birmingham, Centenial Park, and Sandy Springs were anti-abortion nuts. You are pushing the envelope.

Reality

April 23rd, 2010
9:19 am

@Ragner

LOL! You have totally now discredited yourself by invoking Ann C.

Keep up the good fight!

April 23rd, 2010
9:20 am

Koolskat…..so religion is now by majority vote? If there are more muslims in one city or group, they can ban christianity and to hell with the rest.

Granny….great point…Ann Coulter is an moron!

The Voice of Raisin

April 23rd, 2010
9:20 am

“It isn’t the religon that is bad, it is the people that twist religous views to support their views that are bad.”

Islam is not good.

A religion advocating the slaying of “infidels” and oppressive submission of women is not good

I repeat, killing people and treating women like dogs is generally regarded as not good.

There seems to be some confusion.

kayaker 71

April 23rd, 2010
9:21 am

ct,

And you believe that the Muslim “religion” is not evil? Boy, have you got a lot to learn. And here, I thought you were an insightful journalist with thoughts of getting to the truth. You have no trouble expressing your opinion about the right and those that wronged your ancestors. Both of these are evil incarnate to you so perhaps, if asked to speak at a day of prayer ceremony, they can disinvite you. What’s wrong with having an opinion. Like certain parts of the anatomy, everyone has one.

Independent

April 23rd, 2010
9:21 am

“but they are, by all accounts, loyal to their country and willing to put their lives on the line, just like all others.” (Some have died.)

I guess “by all accounts” Maj Hasan was loyal to his country? I guess Maj Hasan “put his (sic) life on the line, just like all others”?
Some have indeed died….
Chief Warrant Officer Michael Grant Cahill (Ret.), Cameron, Texas
Maj. Libardo Eduardo Caraveo, Woodbridge, Virginia
Army Staff Sgt. Justin DeCrow, Plymouth, Indiana
Capt. John Gaffaney, San Diego, California
Spc. Frederick Greene, Mountain City, Tennessee
Spc. Jason Dean Hunt, Tipton, Oklahoma
Sgt. Amy Krueger, Kiel, Wisconsin
Pfc. Aaron Thomas Nemelka, West Jordan, Utah
Capt. Russell Seager, Racine, Wisconsin
Pfc. Michael Pearson, Bolingbrook, Illinois
Pvt. Francheska Velez, Chicago, Illinois
Lt. Col. Juanita L. Warman, Havre De Grace, Maryland
Spc. Kham Xiong, St. Paul, Minnesota

I guess that “just like all others” should read some others.

During his court-martial, Sgt. 1st Class Abdullah Webster, 38, pleaded guilty to two counts of disobeying a lawful order from a superior commissioned officer and one count of missing movement.

When his unit was deploying on Feb. 8, Webster — the battalion security noncommissioned officer — told his leaders he would not deploy based on guidance he received from Muslim clerics.

Army Sgt. Hasan Akbar was sentenced to death for killing fellow soldiers while their unit awaited deployment from Kuwait into Iraq in 2003. Sgt. Akbar admitted killing two fellow soldiers and injuring fourteen in a grenade attack because he believed that American soldiers would kill Muslims, and rape Muslim women, in Iraq. His lawyers argued that he was mentally ill. Sgt. Akbar claimed that he was religiously harassed before the incident, but the defense did not present any testimony regarding religious harassment at the trial.

In 2004, Marine Corporal Wassef Ali Hassoun was charged with deserting his post in Iraq. The military believes he is hiding in Lebanon.

In 2008, a former Navy sailor, Hassan Abu-Jihaad, was convicted of leaking details (prior to 9/11) about Naval ship movements in the Persian Gulf to suspected Al Qaeda supporters.

Now, Ms Tucker, since so many of your previous musings work with precentages; the number of A-A men in prison vs college, the number of A-A persons in CEO positions, etc, etc. Muslims as a whole are very underpresented as a whole in relation to the rest of the population that serve in the armed forces of the US. The armed forces are comprised of ~2.3M persons of which it is estimated 3,386 are Muslims. That comes to .15%. Muslims are ~1.6% of the population of the US. Conclusion: Muslims don’t care much about serving in our military and protecting our country. Some of that tiny population that do serve also prefer to kill their fellow soldiers in the name of Allah. Just have to wonder, how many instances have there been that one soldier killed a fellow soldier in the name of Jesus or Buddha?

soulfinger

April 23rd, 2010
9:21 am

Live and let live. Make love not war. And let he who is free from sin cast the first stone! GM!!

Bubba

April 23rd, 2010
9:21 am

From Lou Michel, interviewed McVeigh at length for his book “American Terrorist: Timothy McVeigh and the Oklahoma City Bombing”.

” McVeigh is agnostic. He doesn’t believe in God, but he won’t rule out the possibility. I asked him, ‘What if there is a heaven and hell?’

He said that once he crosses over the line from life to death, if there is something on the other side, he will — and this is using his military jargon – ‘adapt, improvise, and overcome.’ Death to him is all part of the adventure.”

Keep up the good fight!

April 23rd, 2010
9:22 am

Some Guy…. anti-abortion nuts base there arguments on the bible. Or is that point lost on you. And the militia in Michigan was?