Would you trade your Facebook password for a job?

How much is that job worth to you? Is it worth giving up your login and password to Facebook or other social network accounts?

According to an Associated Press story, more companies and government agencies are requiring a look-see into your Facebook account to make sure there aren’t any hidden treasures that might come back to bite them.

Some prospective job seekers are taking a hike rather than allow such an invasion of their privacy. Others, however, say if it’s a choice between being able to pay next month’s rent or getting thrown out on the street because you don’t have a paycheck coming in, they’ll throw caution to the wind and allow access. What’s there to hide?

On which side of the password do you land?

113 comments Add your comment

Rich D.

March 20th, 2012
11:28 am

No way. That is akin to asking for access to my personal e-mail inbox or cell phone records. If it isn’t available publicly and it isn’t done on work equipment then it is a complete invasion of privacy and frankly should not be permitted.

What’s next access to my credit card statements to understand my buying habits?

1911A1

March 20th, 2012
11:32 am

Never, for the same reasons Rich D. listed above. If a prospect insists on seeing my profile, fine, I will friend them so they can look, but username/password? Not in a million years. As stated in the source story, I wouldn’t want to work for such an employer anyway.

crackbaby

March 20th, 2012
11:35 am

Big Brother is here and he now owns you.

Does the boss give you his PW, or maybe his kid’s?

Probably an issues that Facebook itself will have to address. Maybe create a “valet-key” type PW that allows access (but prohibits changes to) a user’s site and info. Expires in 30 days…

Smarter people just shouldn’t post anything online that you don’t want erbody to see.

say what?

March 20th, 2012
11:36 am

NOpe never. Many of use the same password for several logins. Who is to say that the person retrieving your FB password won’t try to gain access to your emails, possibly logging in to a credit account with the information from a credit bureau account.
We keep claiming that government is the “big brother” who watches and knows all, but the government got out of the snooping business and handed that over to the business lobbyist and the job creators. Who can you really trust with American’s information? I am still upset that ALL of the US credit bureaus are international companies with access to every American’s SSN and financial information. What if in hiring they (the bureaus) screen diligently and they still hire a hacker, or someone who access to American’s financial info and sell it to illegal outfits. These people would not care on bit because we are Americans who have ruled the world.
So protect yourself whenever you can.

Brusierbrody

March 20th, 2012
11:36 am

Sounds like the company is trying to hide something. As long as the president and CEO give me theirs, then sure.

Pete

March 20th, 2012
11:36 am

Not credit card statements but a lot of employers do credit checks on you now.

Laurie

March 20th, 2012
11:38 am

Companies should not be allowed to ask for access to a potential or existing employee’s social media sites. It’s an invasion of privacy. That being said, If I’m ever in a situation that I need to take the next job that comes along, I’ll delete all my facebook, myspace, etc… accounts before ever applying. Another good rule of thumb, create a seperate email address for correspondance with prospective employers or career minded networking groups, keep your personal email account private. If they don’t know about it, they can’t ask for it.

bleefloyd

March 20th, 2012
11:39 am

I DO NOT use Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.
My credit reports have been frozen for the last five years.
I would never work again for an employer if this had to change.

Atlanta Native

March 20th, 2012
11:39 am

RIch D. says it all. It’s like allowing some HR employee to reach into your mailbox at home and open your mail. No way! It’s a matter of free speech; whereas pre-Internet, people would grumble about the boss or the job or the company at the water cooler, now they badmouth on their Facebook page.

Background checks can be sufficiently conducted w/o invading your Facebook. But this also serves as fair warning to prospective employees: because the potential to access your Facebook activity is always there, clean up your act. Delete or hide all photos, comments and links to anything that may reflect poorly on your character or capabilities. (Why are you saving all this stuff anyway?) Put the photos on a flash drive if you must. Remember, you are using the public ‘airwaves’ of cyberspace to make personal posts, so take care in how you use that space.

Duh

March 20th, 2012
11:40 am

Just make up a girl scout boy scout facebook page where volunteering at soup kitchens, saving kittens from trees, and cleaning up parks is how you spend your free time.
“Like” a bunch of feel-good pages.
Become “friends” with the company for which you would like to work, and laud its praises.
Then keep your real Facebook private.
Duh.

Big Al

March 20th, 2012
11:43 am

I don’t see the problem. That Facebook stuff is for kids anyway. Adults shouldn’t participate in such foolishness. Grow up, people.

Paul Fisher

March 20th, 2012
11:43 am

Nope, not an employers business what an employee does socially, could in fact violate a potential employees constitutional rights to free speech.

Are You Kidding Me?

March 20th, 2012
11:44 am

In my opinion, this is a way for employers to take advantage of those jobless due to the economy. Since when has Facebook, Twitter, adn other social media outlets have to do with a person’s qualifications and work ethic? I would never give out passwords to anything. I mean, what next? Employers asking for the user name and passwords to your bank account and the code to your home alarm system so they can check on your life? It is one thing for companies to look at a person’s profile on social media outlets, but to ask for thier passwords so that they (the employer) can go in and snoop around is, in my opinion, a case of Tom Foolery!! No job is worth violating your privacy. I am glad that I work for a company that relies on my qualifications and my work ethic. Plus, I am smart enough to “un friend” a negative person on social media. And I know better than to post negative and hurtful things on Facebook adn Twitter (not just the company, but to individuals, as well).

jassons

March 20th, 2012
11:44 am

Absolutely not…I would file a class action federal lawsuit against any company that asked for it and take it all the way to the Supreme Court for them to decide. I would either withdraw my application or delete my FB account before I turned over any information to these bloodsuckers.

Skip

March 20th, 2012
11:44 am

I thought business was big on less rules and regulation?

Mel

March 20th, 2012
11:44 am

Absolutely not. No way. Not a chance in hell. You’re not allowed to ask personal questions in an interview that pertain to age, religion, or whether you want children so why would this be okay????

Snafu

March 20th, 2012
11:45 am

That is why I would never have an account on these so-called social networking sites. I conact the people who I want to talk to and my business is my business. When I can get the owner, CEO, CFO and everyone else’s private info then they may have a chance..NOT! It would be nice if everyone would shutdown their facebook and twitter accounts but we know there are folks who are too stupid to understand the impact this would have.

People its time to stand up and fight this nonsense. Its this now, what next and the continuation of assault on freedom and liberties with no dissent.

NOM NOM NOM

March 20th, 2012
11:51 am

I don’t have a Facebook account. Never will.

Can we get back to discussing my qualifications for the job now, Mr. Hiring Authority?

jay

March 20th, 2012
11:52 am

they can have my facebook and email password … of course it will the fake one where i get all the junk mail or the the one i give to people i dont know

irishmafia

March 20th, 2012
11:52 am

NEVER ! Any company that would seek that info I wouldn’t want to work for anyhow. I know of a friend who had posted on her site that she did part time modeling work, her sales were slow in this economy and she was fired because her supervisor said she was working at another job thats why her sales were so low. UMM she modeled on weekends! DUH lawsuit following

Snafu

March 20th, 2012
11:53 am

DUH..HELL NO! Its none of their business! People should not be forced to create a facebook page just to puff up themselves or that lousy company! When are people going to stand up and say NO? We need to find a list of companies that are doing this and boycott them. If people don’t buy their products or use their services they are out of business.

Companies do credit checks on the employees but its the execs who end up stealing. So the use of credit checks are an abuse and should be stopped just like the invasion of privacy. If I do my job, can do the job, qualifed to the job then my credit or anyone’s social networking site is irrelevant to my job. If the company is afraid of employees speaking negative then they need to look within because more times than none their is something wrong with management.

Tolls Bane

March 20th, 2012
11:59 am

This is a very simple thing. Prospective employers are attempting to determine if the prospective employee has any “bad habits” that will impact the employer.

Everyone should always keep in mind, anything posted on the internet, has the potential to be publicly exposed at anytime. Don’t post anything on facebook or anywhere else that you don’t want your family, your employer, or a government snoop to see. Photos of you at spring break or out on the town – keep private and DO NOT POST ONLINE! No posts showing tattoos, piercings, drinking binges, or drug escapades … or even discussing the same. Keep in mind, most employers, especially professional occupations, are VERY conservative and image concerned.

Jason in Gainesville

March 20th, 2012
12:01 pm

Simple solution: Don’t use Facebook and you wont have Facebook related problems or threats. Simple, but most are too stupid to know what simple is.

NothingtoHide

March 20th, 2012
12:02 pm

While I have nothing to hide, I would never give an employer my login and password. Its my private profile to interact with friends and family that live in other cities. I keep it private so not just everyone can see it. Not to hide something. If they don’t want to hire me because I have a picture of me holding up a pint of beer for a toast in a bar in Vegas that’s their problem. If they can’t ask you legally about your religion, sexual orientation, or political party why can they invade your privacy by requiring to see your social media info? It’s so stupid. Run a simple background check and see if I have any legal issues. But don’t penalize me for being a social person.

Big Al

March 20th, 2012
12:02 pm

I forgot to add “consarn it” to the end of my previous post; my apologies.

Never! Never! Never!

March 20th, 2012
12:03 pm

THIS IS INVASTION OF PRIVACY! I Will show them mine; only if, they let me read their page first!

Never! Never! Never!

March 20th, 2012
12:04 pm

THIS IS INVASION OF PRIVACY! I Will show them mine; only if, they let me read their page first!

*I meant INVASION*

Alias

March 20th, 2012
12:11 pm

2 WORDS – FAKE ACCOUNT

Security is lax

March 20th, 2012
12:12 pm

I would not hire someone who is so lax with their own security as to give me their password. What will they do with information they are trusted with in their position? Why would companies not think this all the way through?

Don’ ask don’t tell is for passwords not people. It does not matter what the password lets you into, it is to be safeguarded.

Wendy

March 20th, 2012
12:12 pm

Nope, not giving up my password. That is insane!!

Bobby

March 20th, 2012
12:13 pm

I use Facebook because I have to for my current job as an app developer (yes, I develop those apps that you block) but there’s no way I would work for a company that required me to give them my username and password. Sure, they have the right to ask, just like I have the right to laugh right there in the interview and then tell them that my training in network security knows better than to share usernames and passwords.

If a company only wants to hire gullible people who are willing to hand them more information than they need, then they’re not a company I’d want to work for anyway. I am fortunate enough to be able to end interviews on my own terms if they go down this route, but I know not everyone else is. It may be prudent to “disable” your Facebook account before an interview (where it doesn’t come up in a search and if someone goes directly to it, Facebook shows a page saying it doesn’t exist) and that way they have nothing to get access to. You can then re-enable it after the hiring process is completed.

Marlboro Man

March 20th, 2012
12:16 pm

Much like asking a someone to pull up their shirt. Just say NO>

Cammi317

March 20th, 2012
12:19 pm

NO! Not only for the reasons Rich D listed above, but because it is also an invasion of the privacy of my family and friends. My facebook page is private for a reason. Additionally, there are limitations on what some of my friends and family can see who are friended on there. Everything posted is not everyone else’s business.

Marlboro Man

March 20th, 2012
12:21 pm

Those that would give up freedom for security, deserve neither.

Rick

March 20th, 2012
12:22 pm

Moot point. It’s against the account creation policy of Facebook to NEVER give your username/password to anyone else.

Rick

March 20th, 2012
12:22 pm

CORRECTION: Moot point. It’s against the account creation policy of Facebook to EVER give your username/password to anyone else.

Just Wondering

March 20th, 2012
12:27 pm

Employers can ask … a “job” is not a “right” … in fact by having a “Facebook” (I don’t) you are asking for people looking at your life. If you were the owner of a company or you were in a “responsible” position/job … you would ask to … again, a job is not a right … your “privacy” when you have “elected” to go public is a personal decision … Some folks have not chosen well … You have chosen to work for someone else … you have no private life by choice.

elephanthead

March 20th, 2012
12:29 pm

Anyone stupid enough to put ANY personal information on an internet site deserves whatever comes. Facebook and Twitter have suckered you people into providing them the most valuable commodity there is – information. Enjoy being bought and sold, suckers

Marinemom0204

March 20th, 2012
12:29 pm

I use FB to keep up with my grown children and now new grandson. I don’t have hundreds of friends, just people I know. I have nothing on there that would discredit me as a potential employee. I feel this is an invasion of privacy. I would be ok with logging on and showing them what’s there or friend them and give them only certain rights and then eventually delete them as a friend but I would never give out a log on and password to anyone.

Sharmel

March 20th, 2012
12:33 pm

Sure, to the account I want them to see.

David

March 20th, 2012
12:36 pm

I would recommend that one maintain an email address that is only for professional purposes, like a job search. Also, don’t specify where you live on your Facebook profile. This will make it difficult to find you, especially if you don’t have a particularly unique name. For women, I would suggest that you use your maiden name on Facebook, if you’re married. Once these steps are taken, state that you don’t use Facebook.

Roekest

March 20th, 2012
12:41 pm

I just read the article and…….that is f-ed up! This is what happens when we allow government to expand beyond anything we can control. The private sector sees that and follows suit because they know we’re not going to do anything about it (or can’t).

StephRD

March 20th, 2012
12:43 pm

Hey dummies, If you don’t like it, then don’t work there. No one is putting a gun to your head making you work at a certain company. This article was about interviews. If they are doing this to established employees, then yes, that is out of bounds.

And another thing, people who put private information in a semi-private venue deserve whatever “invasion of privacy” they experience. It’s amazing how I know exactly what 100+ “friends” are doing on a daily basis and I haven’t spoken with or seen them in years. Don’t put anything online you wouldn’t want on the front page of the paper!

Samantha

March 20th, 2012
12:44 pm

There is no way I would hand over my facebook password. That is going too far. That’s right up there with them asking you for your medical records. No way in HELL would I EVER do that! It’s NOT ANY of their business! If they want my password then I would request their pass word first and then I would check to see if it’s correct. That’s the same as them asking you for your pin number for your debit/credit card. They are crazy as hell! No way!

View From Midtown

March 20th, 2012
12:44 pm

Not on Facebook, but the answer would be not just “no”, but “hell, no.”

Bill Moyer

March 20th, 2012
12:44 pm

For those of you who seem to believe that not having a Facebook or LinkedIn account is somehow an “adult” thing, the lack of these accounts is taken as a sign that you lack certain necessary ksa’s and can cost you a job. The thought of many high-profile companies who ask for this information is if you aren’t on the internet then you don’t exist.

There are reasons why being on Facebook, Twitter and other social media makes good business sense. If you don’t know these reasons or cannot fathom them, then you are not a good candidate for many businesses these days.

St Simons - we're on Island time

March 20th, 2012
12:59 pm

I had an employer be real sneaky about it – asked me if I was on it
all casual, and such. I have this program that tells me who is looking
or trying to look on my accounts, and sure enough not 2 days later,
I got an alert that someone tried to hack my Facebook. Got hired,
and the 1st time they took me to lunch, I cursed for 10 solid min
about “some dirty !@#$%^&*() tried to hack my Facebook” Really,
cursed out the boss right in front of him, but I pretended not to know,
and he pretended not to know.
But on the inside, I knew – and he knew, and he had to sit there
and listen to me curse him out for 10 min. That was fun.

GaBlue

March 20th, 2012
1:00 pm

The Supreme Court says corporations are people too, but with more rights than actual people. Fewer and fewer corporate “people” own more and more of the commerce. In some communities, or in specialized fields, employment options are few, and getting fewer. Since big business and chambers of commerce basically OWN our representatives, laws favor them more and more, and working individuals less and less.

Remind you of anything? How about the Feudal System! Pledge your fealty to your new Corporate Master, and give Him access to every aspect of your life. Be accountable to Him in all things you do, on and off the clock. For HE has plenty of defenders in the Church of the Holy Free Market — a God whose followers are anything but free!

The war on workers continues, and the big guys are winning, one little piece of your life at a time.

How I yearn for the days when grown men and women had the GUTS to stand up for themselves!

Road Scholar

March 20th, 2012
1:00 pm

Isn’t that what personal references are for? Don’t use it(them), but hell no!

Garrett H

March 20th, 2012
1:02 pm

Handing over your login information is a violation of Facebook’s Statement of Rights and Responsibilities which you agree to by accessing or using Facebook.

https://www.facebook.com/legal/terms
Registration and Account Security
8. You will not share your password, (or in the case of developers, your secret key), let anyone else access your account, or do anything else that might jeopardize the security of your account.