“Anti-bullying” law nonsense

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While Uncle Sam is busy busting legitimate American companies like Gibson Guitars for allegedly using the wrong kind of wood, and local police are obsessed with closing down childrens’ lemonade stands, state governments are feverishly overreacting to schoolyard “bullying.”

In a misguided effort to identify and punish school bullies, state governments from New Jersey to Georgia are enforcing so-called “anti-bullying” laws that actually do more harm than good. These nanny-state laws teach kids to snitch on each other and to interject themselves into situations that may wind up getting themselves injured. The broad reach of these laws extend far beyond the jurisdiction of the schools.

Last year, for example, the Georgia legislature enacted a law to combat bullying in school systems across the state. The GOP-backed measure, led by Rep. Mike Jacobs (R-Atlanta), extends to students’ use of e-mail and other social media sites like Facebook.

Other states are following suit; but New Jersey’s effort may take the prize as the most ridiculous. It requires students to report any perceived incidents of “bullying,” and demands they attempt to stop such actions if they witness them. It also establishes a vast anti-bullying bureaucracy; stretching from individual classroom monitors, to the principals’ offices, the school district level, and all the way to the state-wide education department.

According to The New York Times, the new law – the “Anti-Bullying Bill of Rights” – will allow teachers and students to anonymously report perceived incidents of improper behavior. The extensive bureaucracy that will be put in place requires that schools “designate an anti-bullying specialist to investigate complaints; each district must, in turn, have an anti-bullying coordinator; and the State Education Department will evaluate every effort, posting grades on its Web site.”

Many teachers and administrators are unhappy with the new system. They complain they do not have the resources or money to comply, which could put their licenses in jeopardy. The anonymous tip provision is likely to be used as a way for children to target students they dislike.

Often these laws are passed as knee-jerk reactions to particular incidents that clearly transcend the line between bullying and criminal acts of violence (which, of course, are punishable under existing statutes). Much like “hate crimes” laws long-favored by liberals, New Jersey’s Anti-Bullying Bill of Rights was passed as a reactionary measure nearly a year after a gay college student tragically committed suicide; the result of being humiliated after his roommate secretly streamed a video of a private moment with another young man.

While kids may be unfair and cruel to one another — a natural rite of passage — and there no doubt are and always will be serious instances of abuse, bullying actually has been on the decline in recent years. A 2010 study by the U.S. Department of Justice, for example, found that the number of children who reported being bullied fell from 22 percent in 2003 to 15 percent in 2008.

Parents and teachers obviously should teach children to respect others, and truly harmful behavior must be pubished; but overreaching laws such as these now in effect in New Jersey and Georgia, are as likely to do more to endanger kids than protect them.

The Nanny State run amuck . . . again.

By Bob Barr — The Barr Code

108 comments Add your comment

[...] “Anti-bullying” law nonsenseAtlanta Journal Constitution (blog)In a misguided effort to identify and punish school bullies, state governments from New Jersey to Georgia are enforcing so-called “anti-bullying” laws that actually do more harm than good. These nanny-state laws teach kids to snitch on each other and …Bullying Law Puts New Jersey Schools on SpotNew York TimesToughest Anti-Bullying Law Ever Kicks in as Montclair Schools Get Ready to Re-OpenPatch.comDoes New Jersey's Anti-Bullying Law Ask Too Much Of Schools?QueertyGothamist -Care2.com (blog)all 28 news articles » [...]

[...] “Anti-bullying” law nonsenseAtlanta Journal Constitution (blog)In a misguided effort to identify and punish school bullies, state governments from New Jersey to Georgia are enforcing so-called “anti-bullying” laws that actually do more harm than good. These nanny-state laws teach kids to snitch on each other and …Bullying Law Puts New Jersey Schools on SpotNew York TimesToughest Anti-Bullying Law Ever Kicks in as Montclair Schools Get Ready to Re-OpenPatch.comDoes New Jersey's Anti-Bullying Law Ask Too Much Of Schools?QueertyGothamist -Care2.com (blog)all 28 news articles » [...]

[...] that actually do more harm than good. These nanny-state laws teach kids to snitch on each … Read More… Posted in School [...]

Sighko Sis

September 2nd, 2011
6:13 am

Why don’t you just say you hate fat girls and gay boys, and that they deserve to be beat up. That’s what you really mean.

jack

September 2nd, 2011
6:32 am

Hooray for you Bob, I agree 100 per cent. Passing these silly laws to “stop” bullying is a true waste of time, money and resources. Humans have been around for hundreds of thousands of years and bullying has been around just as long. Passing a law that makes bullying illegal sure isn’t going to stop it. I work in a school system and the bullying is still going just as as strong as before the law but I have seen an increase in students reporting bullying in order to get even with other students.

DeborahinAthens

September 2nd, 2011
6:48 am

Tattle-tale, Tattle-tale, hang your britches on a nail! Only a matter of time when the retaliations against the tattle-tales will result in the “anti-retaliatory snitch law”. if you believe in evolution, and I do, then you have to believe that all these laws are only serving to make us weaker and more stupid. Humans grow stronger and wiser when confronted with adversity. I was teased unmercifully in elementary school. By high school, I was running for student body president, voted to be editor of the year-book and today am blessed with a wonderful career that is high stress and filled with prima donnas. No way could I have made it to this point without learning to handle the bullies. My aunt took my cousin out of school to home school him because of the bullying, and today he is a greeter at Walmart. Humans are very complex organisms and taking the easy way each and every time is not a good thing.

thewindwhistler

September 2nd, 2011
6:55 am

This HIB [harassment intimidation or bullying] will work. Many students lack the tools for fighting off offenders. With the school having an anti-bullying specialist, it will improve the outook of students that they have rights to an education without having to be an 8th degree black belt.

Why just yesterday I was bullied by someone online responding to my comment that Sarah Palin was going to be the next great President of the U.S. I felt sooooo intimidated thAT i COULD BARELY go on. If only an HIB specialist was available. In your heart you know I am right not since Barry Goldwater has Arizona had such a brilliANT candidate[unannounced] living within the great state of Arizona. And furthermore I donot want to be harassed by those that think the tea pary is just a BUNCH of racists masquerading as a political party, Georgia should know

Brooke

September 2nd, 2011
7:00 am

As someone in education, I agree Bob – no law is going to prevent children from bullying each other. It’s ridiculous – we ALL agree. Let’s have some common sense folks and let educators and school psychologists help our students with school-related bullying issues…and, Hey! Here’s a thought! Why don’t parents take responsibility and work with schools to teach children appropriate social behaviors? I’m a dreamer, but keep reporting, Bob!

Bob is the Bully

September 2nd, 2011
7:01 am

Bob – What an irresponsible position. I can only assume you think this early training on pushing other people around will make young bullies more effective when they get older and naturally gravitate toward the Republican Party or the Tea Party.

Holly

September 2nd, 2011
7:06 am

I am a middle school teacher and just attended a bullying workshop yesterday. I can tell you, from my own experience and that of other public school educators – K-12 – that bullying is on the rise, contrary to what Barr asserts in this article. The reason why stats say it’s declining is that fewer students report bullying these days out of fear. They are more afraid because they do not trust adults to help them when other bully them. How many times recently have you read or heard about a young person committing suicide due to unrelenting bullying? It’s not a coincidence.

Furthermore, for Barr to state in writing that cruelty is a “natural rite of passage” is completely irresponsible and, frankly, a contemptible suggestion. Is teen suicide a rite of passage, Bob? How many lives should be broken or lost while parents, teachers, lawmakers and other adults look the other way at deliberate cruelty? What kind of a society do you advocate, Bob, Lord of the Flies?

We are the adults in the room, and should be doing everything in our power to keep children safe. That includes stopping kids from bullying.

Barr is an idiot

September 2nd, 2011
7:16 am

Bob Barr – you are so out of touch it is scary. I have an autistic child that is bullied. Being slightly different that the other children opens up an avenue for these nasty kids to pick on my son. It is unfortunate that you are speaking on behalf of the bullies saying it is just natural. While it may be naturaly that there are going to be kids that pick on other kids it is not natural to let it happen. It is our DUTY and RESPONSIBILITY to do something to protect them. No, I am not saying hand hold them through life and not teach them that there will be bullies in every area of their lives – from school to adulthood to bosses and fellow workers. BUT by trying to protect and teach them the boundary lines it will give all kids a chance to learn right and wrong. Doing nothing and allowing it to happen is sad. Surely if Bob Barr was picked on, shoved, and slapped around he would call a cop and say a ‘thug’ was accosting him…… Bob, would you just walk away and say the bully (thug) was ok to do that????? THAT is the atmosphere some of these kids live with. It is NOT as naive and innocent as you believe…… Unfortunately YOU are the one who is naive.

Dale

September 2nd, 2011
7:38 am

So, bullying is a “natural rite of passage”. Really? Maybe the unnatural segregation of families and age groups resulting from 20th century “corporatization” of society is the unnatural cause of this phenomenon. When most people lived in extended families on farms they were age integrated, even schools had all twelve grades in one room. (And yes, MOST people over the last 10,000 years indeed lived on family and community farms.) When American families were restructured to accomodate the labor needs of corporations, i.e. fractured into nuclear families (now so dear to the heart of conservatives) the result is hyper age segregation–and you have not to look far to see the results when young people are left to themselves in their age groups to develop their own “generational” culture. As for teaching them to “snitch”, it would seem that the alternative is to teach them not to snitch, in other words, to be the young thugs that Barr rails against.
I suspect the bullies grow up to the skeptics on this. (Barr probably among them.) All that said, the law is ineffectual, cumbersome and has possibilities of misuse. We need a change of professional culture among educators, the presence of adults among children and young people, and a moralizing component in our culture that used to be the role of religion. Laws only point to the problem; they do not address it.

Dale

September 2nd, 2011
7:42 am

I should add to the above comment that I refer to skeptics of bullying itself, not skeptics of the law necessarily. Also, I bullied like all get out, and suffered from it. Thank God, old people were in my life who taught me what my options were. I despise Bob Barr even when I agree with him, partly because he is a “natural” bully.

Dale

September 2nd, 2011
7:44 am

Whew! I cannot write this morning! I meant to say “I was bullied” NOT “I bullied”. Although I think kids receive and dish it out, I was mostly a receipient.

Gunluvr

September 2nd, 2011
7:48 am

Bob is right. Bullying is a right of passage and is a natural behavior of our species, so deal with it. All of the laws that are written at the insistence of weakling parents to protect their weakling progeny aren’t really worth the paper they’re printed on in the real world and the children know it. These laws are just going to turn them into little snitches with no friends and no one who wants to come to their all-important birthday parties that are so important to their mothers.

Plus; what can legally be done to them if they are bullying some weakling? Nothing, because most of them are juveniles and the laws just don’t apply to them. Of course they can go to “counseling” and get anger management therapy but most county school board budgets don’t have the money to spend on such nonsense anymore; so in the end everything goes back to square one.

Kids will be kids.

Streetracer

September 2nd, 2011
7:49 am

These laws sound like legislative bullying to me.

Deborahinathens @ 6:48 I believe that post is the first of yours I have read with which I agree 100%. Good job!!

roughrider

September 2nd, 2011
7:59 am

It’s early training by ” big brother” to get kids to monitor other’s behavior and turn them in.

John

September 2nd, 2011
8:01 am

Sorry, Barr. I’m as conservative as they come but I strongly disagree with you on this one. The problem is that there are juveniles that physically resemble adults, but nothing can be done about them. Many of them either have no parents or their parents don’t care (or can’t control their own kid). In some locales it’s a serious problem and getting worse. It’s not nanny state legislation. It’s protecting the citizenry which is one of the few true obligations of government.

Alecia

September 2nd, 2011
8:13 am

30 years ago we did not have such a blended society. Public housing was neatly placed on one side of town, we did not have a plethora of children on meds for mental disorders. Campus shootings were not prevalent, and there were fewer parents with “unmanageable problems”. Today, it does not matter where someone lives. The thug families with section 8 vouchers blend in with the yuppie families that have parents on anti-depressants or anti-psychotic meds with their offspring following the same pattern(trench coat mafia Columbine). Should we expect little Madison to intervene when the group from the ghetto gets into a “disgreement” with the trench coat mafia kids?
What is truly unfair is when a child has gone through the proper channels about being harrassed and the adults and charge have done nothing. Then, once the bullied has had enough and deploys self defense, he/she is confronted with expulsion and other punishment. The schools need to enact a policy for self defense.

Bob Barr is the Bully...or Worse

September 2nd, 2011
8:14 am

Barr is against children telling adults when someone is harming them? Disturbing message Bob…very disturbing.

John K

September 2nd, 2011
8:28 am

Funny to see this coming from the guy who filed a lawsuit against Bill Clinton for emotion distress.

AJC Editors

September 2nd, 2011
8:32 am

Sorry Georgia. Most of us were still drunk from last night’s GT game when Bob posted this trash…uh, article at 5:00am. Internally, we call Bob’s feature the “Barf Code”. Please don’t take Bob seriously, we don’t.

carlosgvv

September 2nd, 2011
8:33 am

The real reason schools are running so scared about bulling is fear of lawsuits. The legal system is well on it’s way to ruining our society by getting us to the point of suing anyone who even looks at us wrong. The courts have reached a point to where they will accept every single lawsuit filed regardless of how inane they are. Money, of course, is the bottom line here and money will win out every single time.

Houckster

September 2nd, 2011
8:39 am

Bullying in school is not a “rite of passage” as GUNLUVR states; Though not everyone who is bullied is scarred for life, it is unacceptable nevertheless. Maybe the laws against bullying are not perfect but to do nothing about bullies is even more wrong. What are we supposed to be teaching in school? If we allow bullying to continue, don’t we teach students that violence is an answer? In his zeal to oppose the “nanny state”, Mr. Barr abandons common sense.

Mr. Barr states as one objection: The anonymous tip provision is likely to be used as a way for children to target students they dislike. Honestly! Of course some students may try to abuse the protections they receive. Then it’s time for the school administrators and teachers to exercise judgment. Is this so intimidating a principle? I don’t think so.

Here’s the reality: The anti-bullying laws are an additional tool that administrators and teachers can use to keep children safe. I applaud the laws and the enlightened administrators and teachers who will use this law to keep children safe.

jarvis

September 2nd, 2011
8:47 am

Anti-bully laws? Really…it’s against the law?
Assault is already against the law….slander is already against the law. Threatening bodily harm is already illegal.

So these bullying laws are doing what? Making it illegal to be unkind? A catty girl can now face legal punishment for being passive agressive? Or an ingorant a-hole can now face legal punishment for knocking the books out of another kid’s arms?

Some people are f’ing mean. It’s not right, but it shouldn’t be against the law.

Devil's Advocate

September 2nd, 2011
8:48 am

Ok Mr. Barr, then get rid of extreme punishment for those who fight. Many kids don’t stand up to bullies today because they don’t want to get in bigger trouble with school and hurt their academics.

jarvis

September 2nd, 2011
8:50 am

And Houckster, there should be miles between “doing nothing” and writing legislation. The government isn’t the answer to everything.

Bob Barr is the Bully...or Worse

September 2nd, 2011
8:58 am

Why doesn’t Barr respond to some of these comments? It’s 8:58am. By now he has to be finished with his morning ritual of parking his car near elementary school bus stops to leer at the children.

  

September 2nd, 2011
9:05 am

Why don’t you just say you hate fat girls and gay boys, and that they deserve to be beat up. That’s what you really mean.

Thank you for contributing nothing.

Your silly, inane posting has no merit. I would like my 5 seconds that it took to read your over-dramatic whine back.

Cactus

September 2nd, 2011
9:05 am

Bob tried to bully his way into an exalted political career in 1988 abusing his prosecutorial authority in costly and unwarranted investigations of Coca-Cola and Georgia Power. Too bad there wasn’t a bullying law at that time to protect taxpayers from his free wheeling and self serving expenditure of federal dollars in fruitless investigations that only proved to show how vacuous politicians can be.

commoncents

September 2nd, 2011
9:14 am

debinathens: I (for once) agree with you!

These anti-bully laws are silly and will only lead to more cry-babies and more children growing up who think they deserve everything. Make life too easy for everyone, and no one will want to work hard.

And yes, there is a difference between anti-bullying and harassment. If we could just follow the laws set forth over the past 100+ years, we wouldn’t need to pass more silly laws today.

commoncents

September 2nd, 2011
9:16 am

carlosgvv- what the heck… Now I agree with you too, for once?

Should I expect to be hit with a snowball soon??

Gunluvr

September 2nd, 2011
9:19 am

Okay, telling/snitching is only going to make the situation for the kids who do it worse. For example there’s a parallel in the adult world. I know a lady who sued a large corporation for discrimination and won the suit but since the suit occurred in a small southern town where this corporation was the main employer, she became an unemployable pariah.

The same thing is going to happen to these children who tattle on their peers. Nobody’s going to want to have anything to do with them( fellow students or teachers). Of course the teachers are going to do what the law requires to save their jobs but the basic problem is still going to be there.

The only way that bullying can be avoided 100% is to home school a child and the majority of parents don’t want that responsibility.

Al

September 2nd, 2011
9:20 am

Bob, you have no idea what is reality these days. When you were growing up, there was the usual harassment that could be resolved in a day or two. Now, there is zero respect for others and people are getting more and more cruel. Kids (and adults, ahem) harass and push until they go too far. A popular taunt for kids these days is “you should go kill yourself”. I never would have said that as a kid (and I was a bully for a year or two). Bob, you are just wrong. Demonstrate that you can disagree while being respectful rather than calling people wimps. You are part of the problem rather than a solution.

Baker

September 2nd, 2011
9:26 am

Bob Barr is……..RIGHT!! Without the “Bully”, how could Teddy Roosevelt ever been elected? Without legalized bullying, how could Der Heetler have become Der Fuhrer? Imagine all the black eyes, split-lips, and missing teeth that would not have been experienced by the pathetic weenies who won’t fight?

No, we need good clean bullyin’. Our founding bullies would never have smite King George if’n they had been little girlie-founders, now, would they?

Ole Guy

September 2nd, 2011
9:31 am

Let’s hear it for ole fashion common sense…a bust on the beak. The school yard fight, as “distasteful” as it may seem to the “refined” sensibilities of 21st Century “enlightenment, is/has always been the ONLY way in which kids learn the real world boundries of discretion.

Remember those Charlie Brown movies where the teacher is pontificating on some point of decorum? Remember the sounds eminating from teach? A horn…WAH WAH WAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLEAT BLEAT BLEAT. We like to think, in our own world of self-absorbed guilt, that kids actually listen to our words of wisdom…they may HEAR the words, but do they register? I rather think not. If we of the older (and presumably wizened) generation “look back” in our mind’s eye, the things/the values which endure are probably those which were borne of experiences, not those words of wisdom from our elders. A term utilized in the Military environment, LEADERSHIP BY EXAMPLE, applies in the teaching of values to our young uns’. However, much of what we learn, as kids AND as adults, comes from our peer; as peer, this leadership thing really becomes a relationship of association…we, as kids AND as adults, tend to gravitate around our peers…kids would no more hang around the swing sets and sea saws anymore than the office jockey would hang around the water cooler with “boss man”. So the real learning, in many settings, takes place within the peer-dominated environment.

So if two (or more) kids have a disagreement of one sort or another, are they going to “discuss” altrnate ways of adressing the issue…NOT LIKELY! They will handle their differences as only kids do and when the adults in their lives find out that their behavior is not in accord with responsible means of handling differences, the adults will PADDLE THEIR BUTTS JUST SHORT OF IGNITION. Over time, the kids will learn that their are, indeed, better ways in which to adress their differences. THIS IS KNOWN AS THE NORMAL PROCESS OF MATURING, something which all-too-many kids (and an almost-equal number of adults) seem to have missed entirely.

Let kids be kids. They, like adults, will always shuffle for positions of (perceived) dominance within their own little groups. As unfortunate as this bullying thing is, IT IS NOTHING NEW. IT’S BEEN IN EXISTENCE EVER SINCE THE CAVE MAN. It IS, in fact, an ingredient in the formation of a civilized society.

Is their any mystery to the fact that, since kids have been discouraged from “behaving like kids”, the courts, particularly the “big peoples’ (adult) courts have been inundated with yet more kids? Maybe if kids were left to their own devices of learning how to behave through the “school of hard knocks” (like they have learned for centuries), they just might learn to grow up to be responsible adults.

Devil's Advocate

September 2nd, 2011
9:37 am

Bullying makes the world go ’round for those who cannot achieve success the old fashion way…wait, bullying is the old fashion way!

Philosopher

September 2nd, 2011
10:01 am

Thank God for checks and balances! If we let you, you would have America be the bully state -no decency, no fair play, just the big guys taking whatever they want by beating up the little guys. No kindness, no humility, no justice…just snatch, grab and beat up. You make me sick at my stomach! We wouldn’t NEED government intervening if there weren’t so damn many people like you … stingy, cruel, self-absorbed and MEAN….and raising your kids to be the same way!

Aged Bully Victim

September 2nd, 2011
10:12 am

Those who say bullying is a right of passage fail to see the world as our children see it. Unlike past generations, in this modern world we created for our children, bullying does not end on the “playground”. It continues to impose emotional strain on the child via text messages, emails, facebook, etc. long after the child has departed the “playground”. My solution as a child was to walk away (or run) from the bully and bury myself in schoolwork. Usually, it was easy to flee quietly. I’m not sure if that would be so easy to do in the modern world. Physically, I would never have prevailed and for some reason, physical harm was one of my greatest fears as a child.

As an adult, I no longer have a fear of physical harm. Although, I’m fairly certain it has nothing to do with the bullies who never had the opportunity to give me a black eye or busted lip. It also makes me feel better, as an adult, knowing that I have legal recourse if another adult assaults me.

While they could be improved, these laws provide similar protection for children that adults already receive.

Brenda

September 2nd, 2011
10:17 am

Bob, I can understand that you don’t like more government regulations but here is what you have forgotten in your argument, schools are government entities. Since when has the “government schools” ever done anything on their own without being told what to do? In the early days of this country, children all went to community schools, paid for by the parents and the community. There was no state or federal involvement. If parents had a complaint, they went to the teacher, who might also be the Principal, and the bullying problem was taken care of. Today, parents can complain until they are blue in the face and because their child is compelled to be in school, school administrators can take their time deciding what to do…unless there is a law.

It’s true that some state laws are lacking in some common sense language. Some have inclusive language (”based on sexual orientation”, color, gender) which is unfair to kids not listed, and some states don’t have enough direction or too much micromanagement. Very few laws are perfect, but they are working. A teacher once called me and was worried because she had disciplined a student for bullying and then that student angrily went about the school making false statements. I told her that in her state there is a “protection clause” against reprisal, retaliation or false accusation and that she needs to point this out to the principal with a copy of her state law. The next day she called me and told me her Principal took this very seriously and the bully was made to go to every student she talked to and tell them she lied or she would lose the 8th Grade Presidency she had won.

Laws were not written for the kids. Laws are written for the adults in charge. Bob, your attitude about bullying is what the problem is all about. If adults in our schools would just do their job and stop the bullying immediately, when it happens, no excuses, there would be no bullying problem. Instead, they say, “boys will be boys”, “it’s part of growing up”, and then we have adult bullies who have never learned to take responsibility for themselves.

I’m a mother of a child who killed himself because he was bullied, and assaulted in school. He developed depression, the number one cause of suicide. I assure you he was not gay. He was just a normal boy growing up in a normal home with (very) Conservative Christian parents (who are members of our local Tea Party). Despite what the media prints, I know for a fact, good children, Christian children are bullied more than and other group. These children are gentle and don’t have the nature to fight back. Well, I could go on and on. I don’t expect you to change your mindset, but for those who need more information on their state law, please feel free to visit http://www.BullyPolice.org or my healing website, http://www.JaredStory.com.

Dorothy

September 2nd, 2011
10:28 am

Although I agree with Bob these are bad laws and do no effectively address the problem; I must say I’m surprised to find that so many think bullying is a natural “rite of passage” and necessary learning tool. In the adult world that type of behavior would not be tolerated. What would you do if someone on your job threatened you, let alone actually assaulted you? You would probably call the police and and file charges. The laws of the land should apply to children as well. But apparently, most people feel children should go by the law of the jungle, or the wild, wild west; where anarchy reigns and only the strong survive. I thought we were moving forward as a species. Apparently not. How sad.

How many children who were already disturbed were pushed over the edge by bullying and then went on to kill themselves and perhaps others? Oh well, it’s all just a rite of passage, isn’t it?

Richard D

September 2nd, 2011
10:40 am

I’ve got a good anti bully proposal. Let Chuck Norris patrol the halls and roundhouse kicks bullies in the face.

Dr. Pangloss

September 2nd, 2011
10:42 am

Bob got all the way to the second paragraph before he said “nanny state.” Ring them bells!

Here’s hoping Bob experiences this kind of rite of passage sometime soon.

jarvis

September 2nd, 2011
10:51 am

I would not call bullying a rite of passage. It isn’t nice.

But where does the government’s role end in polite society? I don’t want laws telling me I have to be nice….even though I generally am.

What’s next? A law against siblings arguing?

quick work break

September 2nd, 2011
10:58 am

One of the worst American habits is tacking on more aggressive punitive laws in the hopes that it might eventually change behavior, instead of actually doing some thinking and planning that could prevent bad behavior in the first place.

jarvis

September 2nd, 2011
11:22 am

Saying, “Don’t talk to me loser.” is an awful terrible thing to say, and my children would be punished for ever treating a person like that, but it should not be against the law.

Even more so, someone else’s child seeing my kid say that terrible thing should not be held legally responsible for reporting it. Anyone that doesn’t think the NJ law is a “Nanny Law” hasn’t thought it through.

carlosgvv

September 2nd, 2011
11:22 am

commoncents

If it would make this cursed heat go away, I would gladly stand and let you pelt me with snowballs!!! Or, we could both pelt the lawyers with snowballs!!!

Jack

September 2nd, 2011
11:30 am

There was a way to deal with bullies back when. That was before everything you do is called racist. Yeah I know, I suffer from a pre-existing bias.

Hillbilly D

September 2nd, 2011
11:31 am

The best way to deal with a bully is to bloody their nose; always has been.

What’s next? A law against siblings arguing?

If we’d had that, me and my siblings would all be doing life without parole.

the guy

September 2nd, 2011
11:33 am

It’s unfortunate and undeniable that bullying has an adverse effect on school aged children, but it also prepares them to be able to cope with their social challenges as an adult.