Health care repeal vote postponed

Earlier this week, in an odd reaction to the shooting in Tucson last weekend, Speaker John Boehner cancelled all votes scheduled for the entire week.  That action postponed the healthcare repeal vote that had been scheduled this week.  In so doing, the Republicans deferred action on a key element of the platform on which many had been elected or reelected two months ago.  Presumably, the vote will be scheduled in the near future after the Republicans feel comfortable once again working.  

Taking the vote on whether to repeal the healthcare legislation passed last Spring and signed by President Barack Obama – often referred to as “ObamaCare” —  is fine; and it sends an important signal that the GOP majority in the House have not yet forgotten their campaign promises.  However, it will be a symbolic vote, insofar as the Republicans clearly lack a veto-override majority in the House, and do not yet enjoy sufficient numbers in the Senate to bring the matter to a vote. 

At least for the next two years, the real battle over the fundamental constitutional principles overridden by the ObamaCare legislation – including the blatantly unconstitutional provision that the government can force a person to purchase health insurance even if they choose not to – will be fought in the federal courts.  Already, one federal judge in Virginia has ruled the individual mandate provision unconstitutional; and another judge in Florida may do so this Spring.  It is likely that the controversy will reach the nation’s High Court before the 2012 election.  

Given the stakes involved in these court cases – whether there shall be any limits at all on the power of the federal government to force citizens of this country to do its bidding – it will be none too soon to get this question answered by the Supreme Court. 

In the meantime, there are some steps the Congress can take to move us at least with small steps, away from the direction in which ObamaCare is pushing us.  Appropriations bills could include cuts to funding various provisions in the healthcare legislation.  The Senate Judiciary Committee could do a much better job than in the past, of aggressively probing judicial nominees’ views on the absurd reach of the Constitution’s so-called “commerce clause” that has been stretched beyond all recognition to justify government control. And  Members opposed to the law can discuss it regularly and substantively so the problems inherent in the law remain in the forefront of the nation’s public discourse. 

A symbolic vote can be postponed; but the ultimate question presented the people of the United States by ObamaCare cannot.

- by  Bob Barr, The Barr Code

84 comments Add your comment

Eric

January 14th, 2011
6:57 am

Great article once again, Mr. Barr! You’re right, the more this topic is discussed, the more fervor for repeal.

carlosgvv

January 14th, 2011
8:16 am

Regardless of when the vote occurs, the reason for it is the same. ObamaCare will reduce the profits of the big insurance companies, one of the Republican’s main sponsors, so they must try to repeal it any way they can.

5 Easy Pieces

January 14th, 2011
8:18 am

Then just who, Eric, will pay for your sociopathology remedies which undoubtedly will take teams of shrinks working around the clock at the university level in Vienna?

Huhhhh?

moron.

The crux of the Rx fix lies not in the K’s of text putting the Z’s on our congress, but in the arrythmic heartbeats of America and it’s favorite sons: the fat, aging, and near-sighted baby boomers who will soon need it. We will start dropping like flies if’n we donts gets new hearts, arterial transplants, and viagra, (we’re getting so old that our blow up dolls don’t suffice any more)

Sorry CandyLips

We have to fund healthcare for our soon 2B senior citizens.

If not, there will be a glut of marital aids being auctioned off on Ebay, and the market will crash. Dont you conservative losers see?

To the cold, cruel but Young Republicans: Save us old creepy guys. Vote “Yeah, Baby”! on Obamacare.

The battery industry depends on it.

What if

January 14th, 2011
8:24 am

Unless you don’t have or can’t get reasonable health insurance. Maybe you guys would just prefer to line us all up and shoot us, and bulldoze us into mass graves, shades of a certain European country six decades ago? It’d be a lot cheaper that either the criminally backward nonsystem we suffered with for so long OR the common decency of health care for all citizens that tne new health care law provides. You say it’s “undemocratic” to force someone to carry health insurance? You could argue that. But if that’s the case, you certainly should also allow the hospitals to shoot on sight anyone who comes looking for the “free” care that the rest of us must now pay for. Some American you are, Barr. As uncivil as any of the rabid psychotics on right-wing radio.

[...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Bob Barr and others. Bob Barr said: Barr Code: Health care repeal vote postponed http://bit.ly/giX7Dn [...]

Stan

January 14th, 2011
8:26 am

If the individual mandate is removed from the bill, the insurance industry will continue cancellation of your insurance when you get seriously ill, denial of coverage for pre-existing conditions, annual and lifetime caps on your insurance, and removal of your children from your insurance coverage when they turn 21. Bob Barr knows this, and it would be more honest if he talked about it in his columns on the health bill.

What if

January 14th, 2011
8:27 am

OH, yes, forgot to mentio that one. The data are in fact there – Barr and the rest of these folks are simply the pawns of the sucker PR generated by the insurance industry. P.T. was right. You CAN fool most of the people ALL the time. Never forget that the average IQ in the country is 100.

Sandra

January 14th, 2011
8:32 am

Bob,
There is never any clear debate on the benefits to the Health Care law. All you ever do is focus on what your supposed rights are that you can’t be made to do anything. I won’t even go to the stupidity around your gun views. At any rate, who do you think pays for all these people who go to emergency rooms and many are ultimately admitted to hospitals because they haven’t had any care for years because they couldn’t afford it? What about those people who go bankrupt because they can’t afford the bills? Who do you really think pays??? Taxpayers that is who. Your’s and so many of cohorts just don’t even really sit down and reason it out. Your motto is ” Don’t make people be responsible and get insurance because that is against their rights!!” Or maybe we should just let’em die in the streets. Or better yet give them one of your precious guns.

Several years ago Republicans were for making it mandatory to purchase health insurance. Of course all you two faced lobbyist bought politicians would never admit to that now.

All of you just make me sick to my stomach!

John

January 14th, 2011
8:33 am

While you mentioned one court case where the mandatory provision has been ruled unconstitutional but conveniently left out 2 cases where judges has ruled it to be constitutional.

But even more importantly, Republicans seemed to be wrong in some of their rhetoric. According to Forbes…More Small Businesses Offering Health Care To Employees Thanks To Obamacare.

http://blogs.forbes.com/rickungar/2011/01/06/more-small-businesses-offering-health-care-to-employees-thanks-to-obamacare/?partner=contextstory

John

January 14th, 2011
8:44 am

Will the Republicans also vote to repeal their tax-payer funded, government run socialist health care they enjoy? One, and only one, Republican lawmaker (a freshman) who ran on repeal has declined health insurance offered to members of Congress. He has admitted it may be more expensive and hard to get since his wife has a pre-existing condition but he feels it would be hypocritical of him to accept Congress’ heath care insurance at the same time he’s working to repeal the health care law. Will others follow his lead? Or will they continue to enjoy their health care while trying to take it away for their constituents?

John

January 14th, 2011
8:54 am

You also didn’t mention that CBO projections on repeal. And knowingly, it would add to the deficit Republicans exempted it from their “cutgo” policy.

In a letter to Boehner, budget office director Douglas Elmendorf estimated repeal would increase the deficit by $230 billion from 2012 to 2021, the 10-year estimating period for budget projections. Moreover, Elmendorf said about 32 million more people would be uninsured in 2019 as a consequence.

How do that fit in with Republican pledge to reduce the deficit? Or do they believe that by adding to the deficit, the deficit gets reduced? More “voodoo” economics, perhaps.

Common Man

January 14th, 2011
9:10 am

Eating just hasn’t been the same since Obamacare was shoved down my throat.

John

January 14th, 2011
9:25 am

Another Republican lie…regulations (such as the banking and credit card) will hurt businesses so they want to repeal those as well. Today JPMorgan Chase announced profit jumped 47 percent in 4Q.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110114/ap_on_bi_ge/us_earns_jpmorgan_chase

Road Scholar

January 14th, 2011
9:31 am

John, good post. Conservatives have selective memories…that is if they remember history at all! Most have already forgotten science!

carlosggv: How, pray tell, will insurance companies lose money? With more people having insurance (required) how will their profits go down? Oh, policing for Medicad and medicare fraud?

[...] law back on House agenda for TuesdayPoliticoHouse to debate health care repeal next weekBoston GlobeHealth care repeal vote postponedAtlanta Journal Constitution (blog)BusinessWeek -Fox News -Seattle Timesall 380 news [...]

george

January 14th, 2011
9:53 am

Main stream America, hard working, successful people will finish the job in 2012. Liberals, socialist, facists are a small minority as was shown 11/2010. Unfortunately, they, at least the ones who at least try to take care of themselves and make their own living seem to gravitate to journalism and teaching. terrible job at both.
Let’s repeal this business killing Obamacare that was passed against the will of the American people with payoffs and bribes and replace it with something that makes sense. Keep some of the great provisions like tranferability, guaranteed coverage for all who can pay and add to it TORT REFORM, COMPETITION ACROSS STATE LINES and CARE FOR ALL THAT IS EFFICIENT AND AFFORDABLE. As John and Road Scholar expouse – they think they’re smarter and more compassionate than us conservatives. They don’t like business or profit. They are socialists and most of us are flat out sick of them – 11/2010 – we’ll be ready for 2012, as well.

Get Real

January 14th, 2011
9:54 am

John…I am very anxious to have congressional hearings on the CBO numbers. Most folks realize the assumptions of which the scoring was based were not realistic. The CBO by law cannot assess the validity of the assumptions. They have to accept them as fact therefore if “pigs could fly” was one of the assumptions that would have to assume that as fact. Additionally, with all the “willie nilly” exemptions that were granted in 2010 the original scoring is null and void and needs to be recalculated. If Obamacare is truly good for the country and is a valid deficit reducer then it should stand on its own merits and it should be obvious as the numbers and the assumptions are reviewed and discussed in a transparent manner as opposed to the “behind the curtain” approach that was used when it was originally passed…plain and simple

Phil Garner

January 14th, 2011
10:06 am

Enter your comments here
The insurance mandate is no more unconstitutional than the Social Security withholding mandate, which requires us all to, in effect, pay our own way and makes Social Security a non-budget issue, especially if the Feds stop borrowing from its trust fund.Yes, one federal judge has ruled otherwise on the new mandate, but you failed to mention at least two others have ruled the law is constitutional. I long for the old days when newspapers would never hire a politician as a columnist.

[...] is cost-conscious consumers, something sorely lacking today (James Capretta and Tom Miller, 1/14). The Atlanta Journal-Constitution: Health Care Repeal Vote Postponed There are some steps the Congress can take to move us at least [...]

John

January 14th, 2011
10:20 am

@George…

“Let’s repeal this business killing Obamacare that was passed against the will of the American people with payoffs and bribes and replace it with something that makes sense. Keep some of the great provisions like tranferability, guaranteed coverage for all who can pay and add to it TORT REFORM, COMPETITION ACROSS STATE LINES and CARE FOR ALL THAT IS EFFICIENT AND AFFORDABLE. ”

Talking out from both sides of your mouth here. First you say we should have guaranteed coverage for all who can pay for it…then you say care for all…does that include those who can’t pay for it? Did you see my earlier post with a link to a Forbes article? I don’t think Forbes is a left leaning organization. Instead of listening to the rhetoric on either side, let’s look at the facts, which is showing to be helping small business.

As far as the mandate, the insurance industry (right leaning) has called on Congress not to repeal it. They are saying that to repeal it, the cost of insurance will rise. Another point, wouldn’t forcing insurance companies to guarantee coverage or transfer insurance be a mandated regulation on industry…isn’t that against free enterprise and being socialist and facists?

Don

January 14th, 2011
10:21 am

“…blatantly unconstitutional provision…?” I wouldn’t be so sure about that.

John

January 14th, 2011
10:29 am

@George

“COMPETITION ACROSS STATE LINES ”

This means more federal government and less states’ rights. I thought conservatives believe just the opposite. What happened to more states’ rights and less federal government. This would force states to eliminate compliance laws which vary state by state.

BS Aplenty

January 14th, 2011
10:37 am

Killing Obamacare is only the first step to setting the healthcare of this country on the right road. A first and necessary step. The course of sustainable healthcare for the vast majority of Americans lies in a competitive marketplace for insurance, healthier lifestyles (if you choose), family and limited government intervention. I believe this is the road the Republicans should pursue.

However, there will always be those with addictive personalities, they usually called Dems, who continually jones for more government particularly when their healthcare drug is free. There’s no end to what they’ll do to gain the government dole, They shudder with the DT’s when the phrase personal responsibility is mentioned. It’s time to get your responsiblity on, Dems, it’s time to go cold turkey from this drug you call Government.

John

January 14th, 2011
10:43 am

@Get Real, both sides of the aisle use and respect the CBO projections since CBO is bi-partisan. They tend to use parts of CBO reports to stress their position. Could this be going down a slippery slope to flat out reject their projections? Will both sides of the aisle not start rejecting CBO projections on bills sent by the other side? Also, if Republicans disagree with the projections, what are they basing in on? Where are their projections? They have not produced anything other than saying they reject the CBO report. Show me the numbers. Lastly, if Republicans don’t think repealing the law will add to the deficit, then why did they exempt it from their “cutgo” policy? There would be no need to exempt it from their “cutgo” policy.

carlosgvv

January 14th, 2011
10:47 am

Road Scholar

They will not be able to turn down people for pre-existing conditions or for certain other medical condtions. This will cost them a great deal of money. But, you know this already, so don’t be a hypocrit.

janet

January 14th, 2011
10:49 am

All I know is that if the insurance industry spent millions of dollars lobbying against health care reform then the reform must have been good for me the consumer and bad for the insurance industry. And one quick question for Mr. Barr what kind of health insurance do you have?

John

January 14th, 2011
10:51 am

@BS Aplenty

“The course of sustainable healthcare for the vast majority of Americans lies in a competitive marketplace for insurance”

Where do you get your health insurance? Check your insurance policy, you may be surprise that is a company competing in the marketplace…not the US Government. I guess I missed where Blue Cross Blue Shield, Kaiser, etc. are not longer private or publicly traded companies. When did they become owned by the government and merged together and not allowed to compete against each other for new policy holders?

Pizzaman

January 14th, 2011
10:52 am

The Teapublicans call it the “business killing” health care bill. The only business I see it killing is the excessive insurance company profits. Of course that’s what the Teapublicans are sworn to protect.

John

January 14th, 2011
10:59 am

@carlosgvv

“They will not be able to turn down people for pre-existing conditions or for certain other medical condtions. This will cost them a great deal of money.”

If that is true, I guess Republicans are anti-business as well. This same provision in the Republican plan. Read their pledge to America. Taken from page 27 of their pledge…

Health care should be accessible for all,
regardless of pre-existing conditions or past
illnesses. We will expand state high-risk
pools, reinsurance programs and reduce the
cost of coverage. We will make it illegal for
an insurance company to deny coverage to
someone with prior coverage on the basis of
a pre-existing condition, eliminate annual
and lifetime spending caps, and prevent
insurers from dropping your coverage just
because you get sick.

ml

January 14th, 2011
11:02 am

the level of stupid in this country is unbelievable. to watch my middle class friends, who have no healthcare and struggle with that for themselves and their children, who have no savings and won’t allow themselves to think about how they are going to live when they’re 60 and older and how that will negatively affect their families, while the whole time politicians program their thought and speech against the things that they and their families desperately need is just mind-blowing. we should help each other out with a helping hand and leg up, not just plain hand outs. we help the rest of the world all the time and with tons of money, but we can’t help America stay strong? what the hell? if your people are stronger, healthier and more fit, you can defend yourself better. you can defend your country better. don’t you care about defending America? why shouldn’t Americans enjoy good things like healthcare? why shouldn’t Americans who help rich people stay rich get a little piece of the pie? could not see you so-called buddy Jesus having a problem with that. and where are the religious leaders of country? if you truly believe in the ideals of Jesus Christ, why aren’t any of our country’s religious leaders speaking out against the bad things we all can see that are tearing this country down? because church has become a business, with most of it’s customers pressured to be republicans through the fear of what happens to you if you aren’t. and with the republican party, starting with president ‘green bean casserole’ reagan, supporting most of the things that have hurt this country, to criticize corporations and the greed of todays robber barons would be anti-republican and that would lose butts in the pews. diminish the customer base. Jesus was about right and wrong, whether hit affected a business’ bottom line or not. you don’t have to be a liberal, nobody’s asking you to, but myself and many other people are asking that you not choose to support evil as your first choice altenative.

BS Aplenty

January 14th, 2011
11:02 am

@John, I get my health insurance through my company although the insurance company, Aetna or Cigna (depending on the year), only administers the policy. My employer actually pays the health claims. I think this is true for many major employers. I actually think the insurance should be separate from the employer, however, and that I should be able to purchase that insurance from any credible company. This is a similar issue to where banking was before interstate branching and holding companies were allowed.

I think the government will always have some role in providing a Medicaid-type coverage, however, given our fiscal constraints, I think that a SUSTAINABLE healthcare system – one that does not mortgage another generation – will come from a primarily market-based system. Similar to car insurance with Health Savings Accounts for individuals. The contributions to the HSA’s can come from employers and employees (like defined contribution pensions) that can be passed on to succeeding generations tax-free.

That’d be a start to a sustainable healthcare solution. It won’t be easy to ween the addicted off the government but a gradual and continual transition is necessary or the system will collapse (it’s already moving in that direction).

Thanks for the comment.

old shoes

January 14th, 2011
11:04 am

keep your government hands off my medicare! dag-nabbit…

TiredOfTheBS

January 14th, 2011
11:12 am

Sure, the insurance industry loves the policy mandate. What they hate are those pesky restrictions like accepting those with pre-existing conditions, caps on ‘administrative’ costs and maintaining policies for those that become ill. Those restrictions will eventually be chipped away by the corporate congress, and the insurance industry will make a fortune.
The ‘death panels’ will be run by the insurance industry, as it already is.
Repeal of the ‘job killing’ healthcare bill will be a ‘people killer’ in the long run.

Darwin

January 14th, 2011
11:12 am

Support the free loaders who don’t buy insurance! Now – that’s a conservative principle we can all live with.

John

January 14th, 2011
11:15 am

@BS Aplenty

“I get my health insurance through my company although the insurance company, Aetna or Cigna (depending on the year), only administers the policy. My employer actually pays the health claims. I think this is true for many major employers. I actually think the insurance should be separate from the employer, however, and that I should be able to purchase that insurance from any credible company. ”

You’re right…most large companies are self insured, but how does the new health care law affect how these large companies operate? That’s how it was before the law…nothing changed. That’s something you should take up with your company…or exercise your right to not participate in your employer’s health insurance plan and buy your own via the private market. The law didn’t change any of that, other than help you if you choose to buy your insurance via the private market and you have a pre-existing condition.

Darwin

January 14th, 2011
11:30 am

Conservatives have no problems building water parks in Iraq and throwing money away in wars and other foreign adventures. But don’t spend a dime here at home. And again, we already have a national health care plan. As your Georgian Senator Johnny I. stated ” we have emergency rooms!”

Get Real

January 14th, 2011
11:34 am

John…all will be made clear once the hearings begin. Until that time, the numbers are in question because the assumptions were dubious. To be clear, the projections are based on assumptions that the CBO has to consider as fact. That is the problem, the bulk of the assumptions were highly questionable…

carlosgvv

January 14th, 2011
11:37 am

John

You quoted something from the Republican pledge to America. Please tell me you don’t actually beleive all those lies and do beleive that serving Big Business is their number one priority. If not, I will know you are just another Republican tool.

Darwin

January 14th, 2011
11:42 am

Hopefully the day will come when we understand that you cannot treat health care as a commodity. The only way to have a system where only those who pay get healthcare, is to deny treatment to those who do not have health insurance. Until then, we are providing healthcare to those who do not have insurance. We support it through taxes and insurance premiums. Having a national healthcare system provides more preventative treatment. Most of our costs go to those who wait until they are extremely sick and turn to the system for care. Denial is not a river.

Get Real

January 14th, 2011
12:02 pm

From the Washington Post:

The Congressional Budget Office projects that the health care law, if implemented as promised, would save $230 billion over the next decade. There are two important words in that sentence: projects and if.

Of all the cost estimates that the CBO produces, the most complex and least reliable involve health care. This is in no way a criticism of CBO. No matter how sophisticated the economic model, the multi-layered assumptions about the future cost of health spending make the $230 billion projection closer to an educated guess (albeit a guess made by very educated economists) than a take-it-to-the-bank certainty.

And even if the CBO forecasts were guaranteed to come true, there is the political calculus to consider. CBO made this point in its usual, restrained way Thursday, noting that “current law now includes a number of policies that might be difficult to sustain over a long period of time. If those policies or other key aspects of the original legislation would have been subsequently modified or implemented incompletely, then the budgetary effects of repealing [the health-care law]…could be quite different.”

Translated into English: don’t bet on that $230 billion. The health-care law will require billions in new spending. It relies on the expectation of billions in savings from slowing the growth of health-care costs and assorted cuts and taxes — all guaranteed to produce howls of outrage, and a burst of lobbying, from the affected interests. Health-care reform, done right and with steadfastness that is not always forthcoming from the legislative branch, could be a huge contributor to reducing the deficit.

But the costs of the new law are far more certain than the savings. Anyone who’s spent any time in Washington knows better than to assume that health-care reform will end up as a money saver.

Democrats will, I suspect, have ample opportunities to accuse Republicans of hypocrisy on fiscal responsibility. This isn’t one of them. And there are stronger defenses of the new law than to claim that repeal would be a budget buster.

John

January 14th, 2011
12:04 pm

Notice how Republicans want to repeal ObamaCare and replace it with, get this…ObamCare. If you read their Pledge to America, it contains almost all of the same provisions. Really the biggest difference is ObamaCare has the individual mandate which the Republicans don’t want. Instead, Republican want more government and force the states’ to ignore their individual state’s laws and let insurance companies compete across state lines.

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John

January 14th, 2011
12:10 pm

@Get Real

“Until that time, the numbers are in question because the assumptions were dubious. To be clear, the projections are based on assumptions that the CBO has to consider as fact. That is the problem, the bulk of the assumptions were highly questionable…”

That would hold true with any bill sent to CBO irregardless of which party sends the bill to CBO. Democrats could say the same thing about bills Republicans send to CBO as well. And of course, we both know Congressmen read the bills in it’s entirety and are honest with the American public about what’s in the bill. Tell me, how many people have been put to death by the “death panels” singe the bill became law?

get out much?

January 14th, 2011
12:19 pm

I wonder when Mr. Barr and his friends are going to try and repeal the Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act – that is the one that says hospital emergency rooms have to examine you regardless of your ability to pay.

Get Real

January 14th, 2011
12:24 pm

John…Don’t get me started on death panels, I agree that was bs. Read the article I posted if you have time. Health care costing is as complex as it gets, you simply cannot put it in the same category as other bills that are scored…

BS Aplenty

January 14th, 2011
12:28 pm

@TOT BS

There are ways to regulate what the insurance industry does that do not involve a government takeover of the healthcare system. Ways to insure fair-dealing. The “pre-existing condition” argument would largely go away if you separate health insurance from the employer. Meaning, you don’t lose your coverage (in spite of COBRA, which I find useless) when/if you are fired/laid-off, etc. You can continue premiums via a Health Savings Account.

Just so you’re aware, I’m not trying to limit employer benefits to employees. I just think that health care can be like other defined contribution plans with employer/employee contriubtions.

John

January 14th, 2011
12:48 pm

@Get Real

Show me the Republican projections on what effect the repeal will have on the deficit. Oh, wait, you can’t because there is none. All they say is CBO projections are not accurate because the bill is full of gimmicks…without citing any. But these are the same people who claimed “death panels” were in the bill. While you’re getting the Republican projections, can you also explain why the exempted it from their “cutgo” budget rules.

Sandra

January 14th, 2011
12:51 pm

@BS Aplenty,
Why don’t you just withdraw from your company’s healthcare and go get your own? Noboby’s stopping you!! And for your arrogant dig at Democrats, I will have you know I have worked all my life, pay my bills, and have carried health insurance coverage while seeing the cost continue to go up and my benefits down. You so arrogantly assume that everyone who is a Democrat or even votes for Democrats must be on welfare, not work, etc. You sir are an absolute bigot (and I am not implying race here even though it probably does apply based on what your postings).
Grow up and realize that there are millons of very hard working people who may not have had the chances you have had and quit being such a arrogant jerk.
Quite honestly, you disgust me.

John

January 14th, 2011
12:52 pm

@Get Real

Not trying to get you started with the death panels, but that’s the same people who want us to believe what they say without anything to back it up. I agree, it is complex…so why not take some time to really look at it and if there are areas the need to be fixed, work on those areas. Don’t repeal the whole bill…let’s work to make it better.

John

January 14th, 2011
12:59 pm

@BS Aplenty

“There are ways to regulate what the insurance industry does that do not involve a government takeover of the healthcare system.”

You keep saying “government takeover” of the healthcare system…now you say there are ways to regulate the industry. This law did regulated the industry…it didn’t take it over. Insurance companies, hospitals, doctors, nurses, the pharmaceutical companies are all still private. Are the law take them all over and added everyone in healthcare on the government payroll.