WikiLeaks is 21st century’s first cyber war

WikiLeaks, until recently a little-known website specializing in gathering and publishing on the Internet communications that governments don’t want to be made public, is now front-page news around the globe.  Legal and technological machinations surrounding the group’s latest electronic dump of classified diplomatic cables and e-mails, however, threaten to redefine cyber warfare.  

This is not the first time WikiLeaks has released confidential information; but it is unquestionably the most intriguing. 

WikiLeaks is suspected to have received this most recent information treasure trove from Bradley Manning, a low-level Army intelligence analyst who is in custody, and who presumably will be prosecuted for his massive breach of security.  Indicting WikiLeaks founder and chief operative, the itinerant Julian Assange who holds an Australian passport and hides out in internet cafes, will be much more problematic. 

Prosecuting Assange directly in the United States will be exceedingly difficult because of the limitations on media prosecutions imposed by the First Amendment to the Constitution.  However, it appears that creative and aggressive use of diplomatic pressure by Washington and London has prompted the Swedish government to employ its extradition power to have him detained for the time being in London.  

The charges on which Stockholm is basing its extradition request are ones rarely, if ever, used as the basis for such serious action.  Assange is charged with having engaged in “unprotected” sexual relations with a woman who “protested” – hardly the stuff of international intrigue or clear violations of major felonies such as was faced recently by filmmaker Roman Polanski when he fought a lengthy and ultimately successful fight against being extradited to the U.S. from Switzerland. 

Still, Sweden’s move to have Assange detained in the United Kingdom for now, on whatever charge, provides time for federal prosecutors in Washington, DC to try and fashion a case against him; based not on a questionable sexual act but one based on espionage or other national security law violations.  This will be difficult, but the pressure from Congress and the American public to do something will be intense. 

Legislative efforts to criminalize the publication of numerous highly embarrassing diplomatic communications that do not appear to contain information directly damaging to our national defense, is a complete non-starter. For one thing, it could not reach Assange because of the Constitution’s clear prohibition on ex post facto laws.  New York Rep. Peter King, who will assume the chairmanship of the Homeland Security Committee next month, is clamoring for WikiLeaks to be classified as a “terrorist organization.”  This too, may make for a good sound bite, but from a legal and constitutional perspective, will amount to little else. 

There is reason for defenders of the First Amendment to be concerned, however.  Leading the charge is Sen. Joseph Lieberman (I-CT).  Since the release of the diplomatic cables, Lieberman has pressured Internet hosting providers to stop doing business with WikiLeaks.  He also has suggested that news organizations reporting on the release of the cables may have broken the law.   Legally, such a position is weak; but from a practical standpoint, it is extremely problematic.  Already, a number of organization through which WikiLeaks raises the money to fund its operations, have succumbed to pressure and stopped doing business with Assange’s organization. 

In return, WikiLeaks supporters, many of whom appear to be highly proficient in use of the Internet at all levels, are causing major problems for these companies, such as PayPal, that have moved to cut off WikiLeaks’ access to funds.  

Where this game of electronic cat-and-mouse will lead is still unfolding; but what we may be witnessing is the first major cyber war of the 21st Century.  Let us hope that the First Amendment, and those other provisions in the Bill of Rights so battered during the prior administration of President George W. Bush, do not sustain further injuries.

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Fred

December 13th, 2010
7:14 am

Bradley Manning should be charged, but Assange shouldn’t. Not unless he conspired with Manning to steal the information.

I wonder if the Chinese are helping to finance Wikileaks……….

margo

December 13th, 2010
8:28 am

gw and dick should be cellmates

Truth

December 13th, 2010
8:35 am

Fred, That statement lacks real intelligence.

Margo, you sound like a brain-washed, one sided liberal.

[...] attack from pro-WikiLeaks hackers. Prime Minister David Cameron's office said Monday …WikiLeaks is 21st century's first cyber warAtlanta Journal Constitution (blog)Corporations Are Drawn Into WikiLeaks ControversyNPRThe Big [...]

itpdude

December 13th, 2010
8:37 am

Fred above is correct. If Manning improperly shared files, he’s the one who should be in the brig (which he is). Wikileaks is merely the messenger.

And the fact of the matter is, and Col. L. Wilkerson (former CoS for Gen. Powell) agrees, the US overclassifies.

jt

December 13th, 2010
8:38 am

“gw and dick should be cellmates”

Along with Obama and about 525 congress people.

Free Assange.

Free speech.

tammster

December 13th, 2010
8:53 am

margo is right, I am all for gw, dick, bush sr, bill,hillary,basically all politicians and cockroaches need to go …..really make a big enough platform load em up shoot en up up up and away …..to mars whereever the rocket poops out ….hopefully marvin the martian will find them and have some real fun…<80 funny thing is I am not joking we all need to stop being so stupid ……there are worse things than cyber war how about real ppl died wars oh now there is a concept get a grip and find something to do OUTSIDE

tammster

December 13th, 2010
8:56 am

really everybody go outside and take a deep breath and remind yourselves there is a real world out there and go cyber screw yourselves if you cant figure that one out cause you ppl are sad just sad

Anonymous

December 13th, 2010
9:51 am

The governments right’s:
1. The ability to spy on it’s citizens without a warrant or probably cause(as shown by the many cases in which they have done so).
2. The right to lead us into a war based on insignificant accusations that were manufactured from a highly corrupt State department.
3. The right to admonish any citizen who question’s its corporatist fascist agenda of global dominance and overthrow of our Constitutional Republic.
4. Corporations are allowed to track everything we do, and sell the information. Research it.

Oddly enough, the citizens of the United States are not allowed to to publish leaked information which proves that our government and regimes/companies it is cooperating with, are highly corrupt.

What has this country come to? When we sacrifice liberty for security, will have neither.

Thomas Jefferson once said that given a choice between government security or a free press, he would choose the free press.

Realize, Anonymous is going to make the corporations and government pay for any infringement on our free speech. You can listen to Anonymous here.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WpwVfl3m32w&feature=player_embedded

SaveOurRepublic

December 13th, 2010
9:58 am

Other nations may due as they will, but I don’t believe Assange should be prosecuted here in the U.S., as the 1st Amendment. Our Constitution should be the ultimate law of the land…irregardless of what disregard the Neocons might have for it (…and no, I’m NOT a democrat…or republican).

Rebecca

December 13th, 2010
10:00 am

Sorry, “Anonymous”, but Visa, Mastercard and PayPal are not infringing on anyone’s free speech. They haven’t stopped WikiLeaks from publishing anything. In fact, WikiLeaks continues to publish.You can still donate the old-fashioned way — by sending a check. All those corporations did is kick an unsavory customer off their customer base. PayPal did the same thing to the porn industry a very long time ago. I didn’t see you pajama-clad basement dwellers rising up to stand up for the free speech rights of porn actors.
(Side note: apostrophes are used to show possession, not plurality.)

Claudia Vandermilt

December 13th, 2010
10:35 am

Wikileaks has caused everyone to focus more on security.

So many questions arise:
How did these leaks occur? Were systems hacked or did people do the leaking? How do we prevent this from happening to us?

Governments and corporations need to consider information security training or perhaps IT Security certification for those in the weeds.

z

December 13th, 2010
10:49 am

Senator John Ensign[r-nv] led with Joseph Liberman and Scott Brown[r-ma] introduced legislation that will help derail the very threat posed to human intelligence sources by wikileaks.
The way I see it the Senators do not like information of the government being released, obviously there is currently nothing in the law books claiming that there was a crime so they will have legislation that will make it a crime and then prosecute wikileaks on the new legislation. I know there is something improper here. If any one does something that the government does not like pass a law making it illegal.I do not see where the citizen has any rights at all under this reasoning.

The only sure defense against leaks is transparency.

“The ultimate justification of the law is to be found, and can only be found, in moral considerations and not in expediency and utility.” These Senators are going the exact opposite getting legislation on the books as soon as possiible.

DawgDad

December 13th, 2010
11:04 am

claudia: The problem appears to be the people TRAINED and CERTIFIED to protect the information leaked it. More training is throwing good money out the window; rest assured, the people who leaked the information were trained and certified. What is needed here is prosecution and conviction, or flipping Pvt. Manning over on the higher-placed culprits, if there are any.

Pvt. Manning committed treason, leaking classified information to a foreign national with intent to harm his country.

Yes, Bob, we should declare this Assange nut-case a terrorist. What does that accomplish? Aren’t YOU the one saying this is cyber-war? Then call out the enemy for what they are and isolate them, making it a crime to provide them aid and comfort. You are WAY off base here.

The American press outlets re-publishing the leaked information should NOT get a free pass here. They can report on the leaks and the impact responsibly without repeating the leaked information; fanning the flames is irresponsible and perhaps treasonous. I say let’s find out if there was treasonous or criminal intent.

We need to focus on punishing bad behavior in lieu of slapping down broad brush preventive measures which in the end only punish the innocent (normally by restricting freedom). All the politicians clammoring to control and regulate the Internet will use this as an excuse to grab power and restrict our freedoms. People who abuse privileges should be punished, not the innocent. The Internet is in the same class as alcohol, automobiles, guns, drugs, radio/TV broadcast media, and yes, boarding an airplane, privileges which should be freely available to all who do not abuse them. Crack down HARD on the offenders and preserve liberty for the innocent people.

Anonymous

December 13th, 2010
11:05 am

Keep in mind that although Visa, Mastercard, and Paypal have infringed upon our freedom by not allowing us to make transactions with Wikileaks, these companies will still allow you to donate to various KKK and Neo-Nazi organizations.

Sound like a hypocrisy? Probably because is it.

Dave

December 13th, 2010
11:22 am

Those organizations are less dangerous than WikiLeaks.

pageone

December 13th, 2010
11:23 am

pajama-clad is the new black, as we move to the 3-day work week and micro-economies…..slow-living is rising as the rat race, already dead, fades into the dust of its parasitic shell……get some pajamas today!…..

Anonymous

December 13th, 2010
11:27 am

Groups that actively undermine our Constitution and preach borderline violent behavior against colored people? I don’t think so.

Wikileaks is the antidote to government corruption, and they are just the start. Hundreds of organizations like then will be online within a few years, and some similar organizations like Openleaks have already opened their doors to whistleblowers.

We are in the information age, and the monolithic status quo will have to just deal with it, because the younger generations widely approve of what Wikileaks has done, and we will decide what is right for this country, not some corrupt Statist politicians who are working for the international bankers and military industrial complex.

I really take to heart when Thomas Jefferson said that if he had a choice between the government or the free press, he would choose the free press. Of course no one wants anyone on our side to get harmed, but the primary issue at hand is whether or not the Press can keep their 1st Amendment right to publish whatever they choose, not whether or not it is a security risk, or setback to our diplomatic agenda. The Constitution doesn’t protect the government from those things, although some people would like to see free speech limited so the Westboro Baptist Church can’t preach their hate. Sadly our does freedom comes at a cost, and we have to be ever vigilante and innovative to stay on the good path, despite the fact that there are crazy people in the world. People can use information to hurt us, but we can also use information to protect ourselves. I would rather die protecting our rights though, than allow our freedoms to be compromised because a few radicals are attacking us. I wonder how many people could say the same. I won’t say they are cowards, but they don’t share our values.

To conclude my thoughts on the wikileaks matter though, to many, this issue was settled during the Vietnam War, when Daniel Ellsberg leaked the Pentagon papers, showing important things the public needed to know to make an informed decision on the war effort. The Supreme Court ruled in the favor of him and the media’s right to publish the leaked documents. Today he is largely lauded as a hero for his actions, and his decision did help bring that war to an end. Our troops were getting sprayed with Agent Orange, coming back dead or with horrible injuries. I’ve met a lot of Vietnam veterans, and feel like we didn’t do them justice, both during the war and post-war. An old veteran who served his country and got sprayed by dehabilitating chemical shouldn’t have to work a painful full time job at Home Depot to get by. We are still paying for the emotional and fiscal costs of that war today. I don’t think anyone wants to see a repeat of that tragedy. It is a black mark on our history which caused great suffering for us and the Vietnamese.

I’ve met people who have been tortured by the State for expressing their views in other countries. One of my professors once had his wrists cuffed behind his back, was hung in the air by his wrists, then had his feet whipped and his genitalia electrocuted. He was imprisoned for weeks. He was only 17, and his only crime was peacefully protesting with other students for equal rights and equal representation. If the Kurdish people were even caught discussing the Turkish genocide against them, or even so much as spoke in their own language, they would be imprisoned and tortured.

Today the paramilitary and police we have put into power in Iraq do the same thing, albeit, under somewhat different circumstances. The same thing happens in Israel, the same thing happened in many South American countries that our government intervened in. In Afghanistan, former tyrannical Muhjahadeen war/druglords are back in power because we propped up Karzai. A lot of experts find this to be a worrysome trend, and can’t help but wonder what will happen to Julian Assange if he ends up here. Will he be afforded the same protection as Daniel Ellsberg, will he be given a fair trial, or will he be tortured and held without trial in a terrorist prison camp? If that does happen… and if they have tortured Bradley Manning, what does that say about our future?

I am very worried that in 2-6 years, our country may embark on an irreversible path that will not afford the future generations the same freedoms we have enjoyed. If people don’t educate others on the risks of submission to “security over liberty”, then things could snowball pretty fast.

Rebecca

December 13th, 2010
11:28 am

Wrong again, Anonymous. You still are free to send money to WikiLeaks. Visa, Mastercard and PayPal simply choose not to do business with you. They are free to do that.
And please post the names of these KKK and Neo-Nazi organizations that you allege have PayPal accounts. Although your “group” is widely circulating this claim, I don’t believe it. I want to see names, so I can research it myself.
Speaking of hypocrisy. You are fighting for openess, but remain “Anonymous”. You have no credibility until you come out into the open and show yourselves.

[...] Source Link [...]

Really

December 13th, 2010
11:47 am

Sounds like we need some hands on sniper training..

DawgDad

December 13th, 2010
11:48 am

Anonymous: I was around when the Pentagon Papers were published. I’d say, overall, they did virtually NOTHING to change anyone’s opinion on the war, and they did a lot of harm (if nothing else reducing proper respect and diligence for protecting classified information, and for destroying public confidence in certain leading press institutions).

Just because someone wasn’t convicted of a crime doesn’t make it right. There are and forever have been criminals hiding behind our laws and freedoms.

TheFreemanSociety

December 13th, 2010
11:56 am

I think every nation should be sovereign, not just our own. The world isn’t our backyard.

We should be a sovereign nation, not one that needs everyone to be lap dog to, playing into the schemes of American oilmen dynasties and corporate elites in Europe, Saudi Arabia, and Israel. They have been having a huge influence on our foreign policy, and we have the right to know that.

As far as whether or not there has been important information in these leaks well wow… Where do start.. Obama’s administration worked with the GOP to prevent any criminal investigations into Bush and Cheney’s connections to war profiteering and excessive military expenditures, it has been proven now that our tax dollars funded paramilitary/government contractors in Afghanistan who hired child prostitutes, we now know that Myanmar has nuclear facilities and may be supplying WMDs to North Korea, we now know that Saudi Arabia is not only the biggest financier of global terrorism, but they also try to leverage their economic power against us in an attempt to force us to bomb Iran.

Theres hundreds of leaks like this, and damn, they do paint a bad picture of our leaders in government.

Maybe we ought to do something about the people creating the problems instead of attacking the New York Times and Wikileaks for publishing information they received from informants.

Can this information potentially be used by our enemies? Yes, but so far, the Pentagon says there is no single case where ANYONE has been harmed as a result of the two years that government leaks have been published by the press and wikileaks.

People may die, and thats not because of Wikileaks or the press, but it is because freedom is not without a cost. I would rather live in a free nation than a “secure nation” if you can catch my drift. Hitler and Mussolini tried to silence the press in the name of “security” during the height of their scandalous rise to power, and if more people had stood up to those bastards and the governments of Italy and Germany, then millions of innocent could have been prevented from being lost.

You have to look at this holistically, within the bigger picture of time, and not just act on some knee-jerk reaction in the interests of protecting our military. Our military is tough as hell and sharp as nails, I am confident they can take of themselves. Our job as citizens is to take care of the country and prevent the rise of a Fascist state.

JeffersonianDemocracy

December 13th, 2010
11:57 am

I think every nation should be sovereign, not just our own. The world isn’t our backyard.

We should be a sovereign nation, not one that needs everyone to be lap dog to, playing into the schemes of American oilmen dynasties and corporate elites in Europe, Saudi Arabia, and Israel. They have been having a huge influence on our foreign policy, and we have the right to know that.

As far as whether or not there has been important information in these leaks well wow… Where do start.. Obama’s administration worked with the GOP to prevent any criminal investigations into Bush and Cheney’s connections to war profiteering and excessive military expenditures, it has been proven now that our tax dollars funded paramilitary/government contractors in Afghanistan who hired child prostitutes, we now know that Myanmar has nuclear facilities and may be supplying WMDs to North Korea, we now know that Saudi Arabia is not only the biggest financier of global terrorism, but they also try to leverage their economic power against us in an attempt to force us to bomb Iran.

Theres hundreds of leaks like this, and damn, they do paint a bad picture of our leaders in government.

Maybe we ought to do something about the people creating the problems instead of attacking the New York Times and Wikileaks for publishing information they received from informants.

Can this information potentially be used by our enemies? Yes, but so far, the Pentagon says there is no single case where ANYONE has been harmed as a result of the two years that government leaks have been published by the press and wikileaks.

People may die, and thats not because of Wikileaks or the press, but it is because freedom is not without a cost. I would rather live in a free nation than a “secure nation” if you can catch my drift. Hitler and Mussolini tried to silence the press in the name of “security” during the height of their scandalous rise to power, and if more people had stood up to those bastards and the governments of Italy and Germany, then millions of innocent could have been prevented from being lost.

You have to look at this holistically, within the bigger picture of time, and not just act on some knee-jerk reaction in the interests of protecting our military. Our military is tough as hell and sharp as nails, I am confident they can take of themselves. Our job as citizens is to take care of the country and prevent the rise of a Fascist state.

kafantaris

December 13th, 2010
12:00 pm

“PAYMENT SYSTEMS ARE THE HEARTBEAT OF ALL COMMERCE AND NO ONE SHOULD EVER INTERFERE WITH THEM.”
======================
The State Department should not have pressured Amazon, Paypal, Visa, and Mastercard to turn away WikiLeaks. Aside from the futility of such a move (the cat is now out of the bag), it significantly affects everyday businesses around the world which rely on established ways to get paid. The last thing they need during this holiday season is to be embroiled in politics.
As things stand now, those offended by Paypal might not use it, or its partner ebay. Those offended by Amazon, might not order the kindle. Those offended by Visa and Mastercard might use cash or checks. Worse, they may not buy much for Christmas – - even forego that planed trip, or dinner at that nice new restaurant.
And all for naught.
To be sure, the State Department is recoiling from its decision. Yet, in fear of losing face, it is paralyzed and not likely to change course. It has, however, put away the club, and as such Amazon, Paypal, Visa and Mastercard should quickly reverse course.
And the State Department might be the first to be relieved from such open defiance.

DawgDad

December 13th, 2010
12:06 pm

Anonymous: You are spouting a tirade of “ifs” and ignoring the apparent fact that a crime WAS committed here – the leaking of classified information by a member of our military. As a former member of our military I can tell you this is something NOT to be taken lightly. Manning has protections under the UCMJ and he’s going to face the penalties for his actions, too.

Do you REALLY want people like Manning protecting our nuclear secrets, or fighting alongside our sons and daughters? God help us.

DawgDad

December 13th, 2010
12:16 pm

“Wikileaks is the antidote to government corruption, and they are just the start.” Akin to anarchy. Virtually all of us acknowledge the need for a responsible government, even if we disagree over the terms and limits and proper role. Anarchy is NOT in our best interest. If you think it is, please pack up and leave this country post haste.

bahman

December 13th, 2010
12:28 pm

expression of freedom ,free air,free Assange

LTFalconsFan

December 13th, 2010
12:31 pm

WikiLeaks exposed a lot of skulduggery that the government would just as soon we never knew about. The fact that they embarrassed dumbasses like Hillary Clinton who thought her antics would never see the light of day bothers me not in the least.

Wrong

December 13th, 2010
12:36 pm

Daniel Ellsberg’s charges were dismissed by the judge due to the gross misbehavior of the prosecution. There was never a finding of fact in the case because the judge said the issues raised against the prosecution’s conduct were incurable. That is a long way from finding his actions legal.

Ellsberg himself stated that he expected to go to jail, and that he was willing to do it for his country. While I respect his position, I view his acts as criminal. I also understand and respect the position of someone willing to break the law for what they consider the greater good. The lies told during the Vietnam War cost us many lives, and Mr. Ellsberg believed the lies needed to be revealed. I only hope I am never asked to answer such a moral question.

The courts did find that the Times was free to publish the Pentegon papers. This is the first amendment issue that some cite as precedent setting when discussing the Pentegon Papers.

The parallels between the role players in the Wikileaks appear straight forward. If the government has indeed properly identified the people within the government that leaked the information, those people need to be prosecuted. As for Asange, he is the publisher of new media. The standard is different. His role is that of the publisher of the Times. The publishing of these communications may be morally outragous, and may cost lives, but he is protected by the constitution, just as was the Times.

From an information security perspective, the government has policies for least privilege access that appear to have been violated. Information access rights appear to have been too broad, and needs to be tightened. It doesn’t require a security certification to understand the issues. What is required is the budget for the appropriate controls including ongoing assessments of the controls against their requirements.

Libertarian Man

December 13th, 2010
12:55 pm

You nationalistic psychos are scary. Maybe you should all give your lives up for your country “over there” so the rest of us can live ours peacefully without your nazi mind set.

JLD

December 13th, 2010
1:22 pm

Bob Barr…………….. What can one say?? I can only guess he approves of our government keeping us in the dark about the wrong doings they are involved in around the world. Is it any wonder that Americans are hated. The US Government has its’ nose in every aspect of life around the world. Then, when some controvercy erupts our government always blames the other guy……………..911 comes to mind and then the government puts on a big show and invades a country that had nothing to do with 911!!!How bogus is that???? Are the 30% of the supporters of this style of rule ever going to get it?????

carlosgvv

December 13th, 2010
1:29 pm

The genie is out of the bottle and is now getting your attention. This is just the start of a whole new set of problems we don’t need on top of the ones we already have.

a

December 13th, 2010
1:35 pm

Cyberwarfare are actions by a nation-state to penetrate another nation”s computers or networks for the purpose of causing damage or disruption. In may of 2010 the pentagon set up its new “Cyber Command”.
Sooooooo Julian Assange is not representing any country so this is not the first instance of Cyber War in the 21st century. Now, of course, he were representing some nation-state it would be the first instance of Cyber-War in the 21st century, that is ofcourse, the information had some real “top of the line” security secrets. Now, the Private that was privy to these secret communications, I do not know when privates had top of the line secret information, that is General’s stuff. Blaming the lowest rank for leaking classifed info is the path of least resistance.

Whiz

December 13th, 2010
2:02 pm

I’m the Whiz. Nobody beats the Whiz. Nobody.

Anonymous

December 13th, 2010
2:21 pm

We won’t deny that the people who leaked this information cannot be prosecuted legally, if they are military members. Members of the military are subject to a different code than the average citizen, of course because some secrets are meant to be kept secret.

The fact that a Private was able to access this information is interesting.. It was gross mistake on the behalf of our politicians the last 9 years.

But now the information is out.. And so far there has been no physical harm due to it. The Press will not be shutdown, and no one is going to be assassinated. That’s just knee-jerk reactionary talk.

If the government does reactivate the Espionage act of 1917, we can expect to see some major peaceful resistance to the government as a result. In all honesty, it is long overdue. Some of our politicians have done things that they should be imprisoned for. They shouldn’t be out in the public, free to cooperate with corporate lobbyists on our tax dollar.

And in case you have a problem with the internet’s ability to give anonymity to dissidents, get used to it. We are the watchers of the government, of the corrupt, and of those who wish to dismantle the Constitution. We are Legion, and we will not be silenced.

Welcome to the information age, where freedom of consciousness meets transparency. We will body scan the government, and expose the corruption within that terrorizes our world.

SaveOurRepublic

December 13th, 2010
2:46 pm

Anonymous, I assume you’re familiar with Alex Jones’ work (infowars.com, his documentaries, etc.)? He too alludes to the Globalist Elite (puppet ma$ters) & their allies in the Central Banking Cartel. Our Constitution must be upheld at all costs.

Xio

December 13th, 2010
2:57 pm

Whha whaa please show proof so i can do research waa waa.
For god’s same you lazy ass people. Why don’t you do your own research and disprove everyone hmm? Sorry if that stops you from laying down eating Cheetos all day.

Rebecca

December 13th, 2010
3:42 pm

Sorry Xio,
Anonymous is making the claim. It is their responsibility to provide some evidence to back it up. There’s no credibility behind it until they do so.

Anon

December 13th, 2010
9:15 pm

It seems like many of you are very afraid. You will be even more fearful if you give the government more power. The government is not capable of being responsible. They commit illegal acts, atrocities of grand scale. They brainwash and control the masses with the Corporate Oligarchy in an attempt to make their vision of humanity the pervasive force on the planet. The elite class, be they political, economic, or religious, are a virus on humanity, and the only cure is the pure uncensored truth.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F3_EXqJ8f-0&feature=player_embedded

the original and still the best John Galt

December 13th, 2010
9:25 pm

As a retired military officer, I seriously question how and why a PFC was ever given access to information classified SECRET. It seems to me that PFC Manning must not have even been finished with his training, or he would have been a Specialist 4.

The idea that PFC Manning was the one who leaked all those diplomatic cables with the SECRET classification seems highly dubious to me.

John Land

December 13th, 2010
11:12 pm

You have your facts wrong. This is not the 21st Century’s First Cyber-War. It isn’t even an attack, nothing was impeded. The country of Estonia was attached by the first ever cyber-war in 2007. The result of which brought down the country’s internet infrastructure and even affected ATMs. America has seen nothing like that.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2007_cyberattacks_on_Estonia

In fact the WikiLeaks incident plays nicely into the governments hands to pass a new law called The Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act (COICA). If passed, this law will allow the government, under the command of the media companies, to censor the internet as they see fit, like China and Iran do, with the difference that the sites they decide to censor will be completely removed from the internet and not just in the US. Please see the following article from the Huffington Post for more information.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-segal/stop-the-internet-blackli_b_739836.html

If passed the government through the Department of Justice can shut down any site it chooses without any due process or recourse. If a patsy like Julian Assange didn’t already exist they would need to fabricate one. And what information did Assange disseminate anyway? A bunch of low level communications? What for, why take such a risk for information of such little consequences? Maybe Assange himself is a CIA operative and used as a tools to take away our internet freedoms?

[...] WikiLeaks is 21st century’s first cyber war | The Barr Code. [...]

Karl Marx

December 14th, 2010
6:46 am

During WWII we so confused the Germans that they missed where the landings were to occur at Normandy. Why then are we not using WikiLeaks as a misinformation tool? Or have we already?

Pats and Taps

December 14th, 2010
8:48 am

Bob Barr is……RIGHT! Cyber Wars!! Minutes after Gore invented chat-rooms,the first cyber-skirmish erupted. It took only 27 comments in a hesitant yet open-forum dialogue between the first two trolls for one poster to call the other commenter a “moron”. Then it has escalated to where the trolls are now taking (wiki)leaks on each other.

Somebody grab a hose……oh, right, they already have grabbed their hoses.
Real hose-down from some real hosers. Every cyber- technique I know I learned in Kindergarten. I’m a troll, you’re a troll. Women who flame men and the men who love them. It takes a village of morons to troll up cyberspace the way we have in one short generation of “writers”.

Women are from Yahoo, men are from Google. I Spam therefore I AM!!!! You are what you Tweet!

somebody stop me.

The AJC Stinks

December 14th, 2010
9:56 am

Sometimes I connect the dots and learn things ignored by the corporate media. Every Friday evening the FDIC releases the names of banks that it just ordered closed. I peruse the list out of curiosity to see what local banks may have died. Over time, I’ve noticed that a lot of banks were closed in the state of Georgia. That makes no sense since it was not one of the states hit worst by the real estate crash, like: Florida, Arizona, Nevada, and California. I just counted the current list and the state with most bank failures is Georgia, which has just 3.16% of the American population and ranks 9th in state population! Hard hit California has four times its population and fewer bank failures?

The Feds nor our corporate media seem interested in this obvious clue of massive criminal activity that cost taxpayers billions of dollars. I googled and see that only “Business Week” made a comment on this oddity, noting cases of obvious criminal abuse remain uninvestigated. Unfortunately, most of our tough investigative journalists have been retired and replaced by wealthy spokesmodels. Note that our most famous investigative program “60 Minutes” now reserves one of its three weekly slots for a celebrity interview. PBS “Frontline” remains the best, although its content has been watered down after if was somehow taken over the “New York Times” corporate syndicate.

Here is my question for the Feds and our media: How can the state of Georgia have the most bank failures when it ranks 9th in population and wasn’t one of the states hardest hit by the real estate crash? I wonder if such observations may cause my demise. In the movie “The Pelican Brief” an obscure law school student writes paper on a theory about who killed two Supreme Court Justices. She soon finds herself in mortal danger. Perhaps one of my odd musing may cause well-dressed men to gun me down in an “apparent robbery attempt,” while this website closes down for “content violations.” Yet I ask again: Who illegally pocketed billions of dollars in federally backed loans from Georgia banks?

margo

December 14th, 2010
6:00 pm

bob’s mustache is cool