17,500 Canadians Can’t Be Wrong

Since Barack Obama was inaugurated President just over seven months ago, some 17,500 Canadian have come to the U.S. to receive health care.  Just since the President’s health care legislation was introduced in the House of Representatives in March, about 12,500 Canadians have come here for health care.  During that same period, how many Americans have travelled north to obtain health care in Canada because they couldn’t get it here in the States?  

The average wait time for a Canadian to obtain treatment from a specialist after seeing a primary care physician?  About 4-1/2 months.  In the U.S.?  Virtually none.

Want to see a primary care doctor in the U.S.?  Pick up the phone and call one.  In Canada, get in line behind the five percent of the population waiting to get a primary care physician (about 17 million Canadians).

And still there are those in Washington extolling the benefit of a government-controlled, single-payor heath care system .  .  .  like they have in Canada.

284 comments Add your comment

DirtyDawg

August 28th, 2009
9:43 am

Hey BOB, where do you get your insurance? Through the Cox folks? You got a company of your own that you purchase stuff through (and write it off)? If you are on your own, then you probably pay between $15 and $20 thousand a year – and that’s if you don’t have any major illnesses or surgeries. Well, good luck on being able to keep that when the paper’s out of business and the market for your prejudice-filled diatribes dries up. Maybe, and I don’t know, or care, how old you are, you’ll be able to make it to Medicare – then you’ll only have to hope that the cost of the drugs you take will have finally been ‘negotiated’ down to an affordable level. Of course, and what am I thinking, as a Congressman – even if for only a short while – you probably sacked away tons of ‘campaign contributions’, maybe even a promise from some health-care insurance company to provide you and yours coverage for life if you’ll just ‘vote for (or against) this one little thing’. I’d really be curious what motivates you BOB, is it Galbraith’s observation that Conservatism is simply the search for a better excuse for selfishness? Or do you have other financial incentives – beyond just not willing to pay what someone else determines is ‘your fair share’ of taxes. Regardless, whatever your motivations they sure ain’t because you care about others – nosiree, that’s not what moves you, is it BOB?

It really does my heart good to read the reaction ‘Conservatives’ have when they find out that they are in the fix that they laughed at for so long about all those others that could ‘just go to Grady’ when they have a problem. When the shoe’s on your foot, it seems a little tight, don’t it?

Dave

August 28th, 2009
9:44 am

We’re in this fix because we have been conditioned that someone else should pay for our healthcare/health insurance. Most of us expect the company we work for to pay for it because back around WW2 companies were not permitted to raise wages so they began offering incentives like health insurance to attract employees. It was the government that prohibited the raises, so you could say that the government caused all of this to begin with. If we had all grown up with the idea that we were responsible for our own health care/health insurance (like auto insurance, home insurance, etc) we would not be having this conversation. Why is it that so many people have no problem spending hundreds a month on cell phones, cable TV, hair and nails, etc, but are so indignant about having to pay for their own doctor visits?

Atlanta Native

August 28th, 2009
9:44 am

Of course Americans buy prescription drugs from Canada. The Canadian taxpayers are footing the majority of the bill for them.

If Canadian Healthcare is so good, why is it the outgoing head of the program and the ingoing head agree on one thing: the system is broken and needs overhaul?

Jennifer

August 28th, 2009
9:44 am

Californication, can you give more detail on the Prime Minister’s wife coming here for treatment?

David Chastain

August 28th, 2009
9:46 am

Wait Times in Canada – Government committed to investing $4.5 billion over the next six years, beginning in 2004-05, in the Wait Times Reduction Fund.

“The Wait Times Reduction Fund will augment existing provincial and territorial investments and assist jurisdictions in their diverse initiatives to reduce wait times. This Fund will primarily be used for jurisdictional priorities such as training and hiring more health professionals, clearing backlogs, building capacity for regional centres of excellence, expanding appropriate ambulatory and community care programs and/or tools to manage wait times.”

Link: http://snurl.com/rghkk

Tracy

August 28th, 2009
9:46 am

“five percent of the population waiting to get a primary care physician (about 17 million Canadians)”
Five percent of Canada’s population is 1.7 million. An error of this sort makes it difficult to trust the other figures in the article.

Michael Smith

August 28th, 2009
9:48 am

Evidently off his meds, “Dual Citizen” asserted:

DEMAND IT PEOPLE, IT IS A RIGHT IN ALL BUT ONE CIVILIZED COUNTRY…..THIS ONE!!!!!!

A right to healthcare? Since healthcare is a product of human labor — like all the goods and services we enjoy — a “right” to healthcare is the claim to a right to another man’s labor. It is the claim that someone else must labor — involuntarily, i.e. whether they like it or not — for your benefit.

But there can be no such thing as the right to another man’s labor — because there is no such thing as any sort of right to involuntary servitude on the part of others.

The Lemmer

August 28th, 2009
9:48 am

No one here (unless I missed it) is talking about the real problem. Healthcare costs in this country will be lowered when Congress passes a powerful TORT REFORM LAW!!!

Unfortunately, that’s not going to happen since the American Association of Justice (what a b.s. name for a bunch of plaintiff’s attorneys) is a lobbying heavyweight and continues to grease the palms of any Dem on the Hill.

Doctors can afford to be doctors under the current sue-your-butt-in-a-flash system.

What say you?

Les Miles

August 28th, 2009
9:49 am

JackLeg, could it be that the long gone jobs are not coming back and that the ones that replace them will not provide the income of the ones lost. Do you think that prices for essential items such as health care will decrease proportionally? Under the present system JackLeg? Do you trust the benevelancy of today’s insurance industry to give up such a large percentage of their profits for the common good? Do you think they are going to do as others have had to do? Trim the fat, give up bonuses, etc?

What is getting lost in this argument is that it is COST that is the problem. And nothing prior to this debate was doing anything to provide a catalyst for the profiteers in the present system to lower cost. The best possible solution is to provide a competitor that the private insurance monolith can’t drive out of the market.

Hoping For Rational Debate

August 28th, 2009
9:50 am

Wealthy folks who build expensive homes on the beach who can’t get insurance for those expensive homes because insurance companies know that it would be a sucker bet on their part, what do they do? They get insurance from the government of the good ole USofA who sees fit to provide special insurance for rich people to have fancy homes where nature says they should not be. But people who can’t get health care coverage because insurance companies only want to insure healthy people, what do they do? They just die for the most part. Anyone who thinks that is fair is beyond heartless IMO.

Ry

August 28th, 2009
9:53 am

TG – The current proposal overall does not promote a single payer system directly. However, there are parts of the bill that very much support that and in looking to the future, the impact of the bill is projected to lead to a government run system. It is a wolf in sheep’s clothing. If you actually read the bill…oh wait that campaign promise from Obama about transparency and the general public having a chance to read bills before they are voted on never happened. Why do you think he wanted to rush the bill through so quickly? Also, healthcare is not the most important issue in this country at this time. It is the economy and jobs. If the approximately 15 million people who can’t afford health insurance had a job, then guess what they could afford it. Obama loves to say that there are 47 million uninsured in this country. However, a large portion of those can afford health insurance and choose not to get it. Why should tax payers foot the bill for those who simply choose not to buy insurance even though they can afford it? That is part of the problem, people do not want to take responsibility for themselves and want the government to pay for everything, even if it means lower quality care. Social Security is bankrupt, Medicare is bankrupt, the postal service is bankrupt. Why does anyone think the government can provide quality healthcare without going bankrupt?

Dale

August 28th, 2009
9:55 am

Hoping for Rational Debate…so you are saying that it is wrong for the govt to provide insurance for the folks on the beach, but they should provide insurance for another segment of the population? I say two wrongs don’t make a right and I say govt doesn’t belong in the insurance business period!

Trey

August 28th, 2009
9:58 am

Atlanta Native, actually he has every right to talk against the plans of the Government, as an American if he does not like something the Constitution provides him the right to disagree and talk about the Government’s plans.

Citizen

August 28th, 2009
10:01 am

DeborahinAthens I have known plenty of Canadians that did not like their healthcare. My parents worked for Nortel who originated in Canada. Healthcare is one of the reason they put in for transfers down here and did not go back once Nortel tanked. Teh waits and the approvals were all to much.

Also lets just assume that Germany or the UK has better healthcare (not that they do) Europe nationalize the passenger rail industry and you have clean safe bullet trains crossing the continent. The US does the same and we have Amtrak. The politicans will make sure we get crap pork barrel picked coverage just as we do under medicare and the VA.

If you wnat to lower costs pass tort reform.

If you want shorter lines for Emergency care tighten border control and ship the illegals back.

Yurtle_the_turtle

August 28th, 2009
10:01 am

Gail

I understand and hear you very well. I have had several shoulder dislocations and have had to pay them myself, although I had BCBS also. And dental “insurance” is a joke. My wife’s teeth cost us $5,000 this year. We’re paying off these medical bills ourselves and I’m tired of doing it as I pay BCBS every month out of my pay check. I agree something needs to get done. I blame Democrats and Republicans, but especially Democrats for their liberal mind set of paying healthcare for EVERYONE, including illegal aliens. However, I truly believe that the answer is NOT Socialism/Communism. Tort reform and insurance reform is a better answer than Socialism. I don’t want to pay for someone’s poor health choices that require medical attention. I try to keep my health up with regular exercise and choosing not to smoke or drink excessively. I see many overweight people who practice no restraint on eating/drinking and then never visit a gym or walk for health. Why should I pay for their negligence? So, I don’t want to pay for “ALL”, just for my family and myself.

Atlanta Native

August 28th, 2009
10:02 am

Dave – they were educated by babyboomers. That’s why. They have been indoctrinated since they were young to rely on government. I remember the amazing switch in what I was taught when my parents yanked my arrogant, in-trouble behind out of public high school and sent me to Catholic school. Suddenly things were my responsibility. I hated at the time, but I am so glad that they did it, or I may have ended up like my peers in public school, several of which I can see at local bars every day if I wish!

Trey

August 28th, 2009
10:04 am

Les Miles, I can’t see anything good out of free health care, but we should have a majority vote as that is true democracy and then if the ones who want free health care win we can try their system for a while.

The Lemmer

August 28th, 2009
10:05 am

Michael is correct. It’s troubling enough that I, along with other working people, financially support thousands of teenage baby factories. Why should we be forced to pay for their healthcare?

Trey

August 28th, 2009
10:06 am

Exactly, public school is a complete failure, Atlanta Native.

jconservative

August 28th, 2009
10:11 am

“And still there are those in Washington extolling the benefit of a government-controlled, single-payor heath care system . . . like they have in Canada.”

Bob, what do you think we have here? Annual report from the Director of CMS……..
“CMS is the largest purchaser of health care in the United States, serving about 92 million Medicare, Medicaid, and State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) beneficiaries. ”

Food for thought.

booger

August 28th, 2009
10:13 am

Once again this debate is avoiding the central issue. WE CANNOT AFFORD THIS. Our country is out of money, and the wonderful medicare system we already have will be broke by 2016, followed close behind by social security.

Sean

August 28th, 2009
10:15 am

FYI.. I think your math is wrong Bob… 35 million people live in Canada. 5% of 35million = 1.75 million. It does not equal 17 million.

Atlanta Native

August 28th, 2009
10:15 am

By the way, one of my best friends, who went to the same public school I did is working for NASA in a very high level position and is the minister of his own church. So, yes, one can get an excellent education if one wants to and those of you who get upset at my comment and point to their or their children’s success, I am happy for them. It still does not wash away the indoctrination that takes place from a young age. I remember when my nephew wrote an essay in high school and was given it back because his opinion was wrong! He was told to rewrite it from the opposite opinion.

gloom and doomer

August 28th, 2009
10:15 am

Having lived and worked in Europe for a very long time as an ex-pat, I thought the medical care offered there was very good. I paid 240 euros a month as my share, and my employer matched it.

Before I returned to the states, I had my knee worked on and repaired, a pre-existing condition. Deductible to me? Nothing. Cash out of pocket? Zip. A year or so before that, I had a separated retina which was lasered closed. During the exam, they discovered a congenital defect in both eyes (aka “pre-existing condition” in the states) and they mended these in the course of the surgery. Cost to me? Nothing. At the same time, a friend of mine here locally also had a separated retina and was handled in Atlanta. The result? Almost 8 grand out of pocket as I recall to cover her share, and she now has less than 60% vision in that eye as well as clouding.

At the time, I paid a maximum of 8 euros for ANY prescription written by my Dr. for me. My girlfriend recently had to buy some medication prescribed by her doctor, and her co-pay was **$90**. The cost of the medicine without her insurance would have been $167. She recently flew to europe and took her new prescription with her, which they filled there with no problem. Since it was a non-standard prescription (that means it wasn’t a doctor in country that wrote it) she had to pay extra instead of the usual covered price. Horror or horrors!! It cost her 12 whole euros, or about $18!!!

There are lots of other stories I know about concerning medical coverage in europe, but they would probably be wasted on the twin synapse thinking that is so prevalent from many on this blog commentary as evidenced with comments that have no more substance and whose platform consists of no more than “Merkuh – luv it or leave it!!” no matter what the topic.

Oh, I can hear those banjos firing up now!!

MC

August 28th, 2009
10:16 am

Laura, you seem to have a different view of the Canadian Medical situation than Dr. Anne Doig, the incoming President of the Canadian Medical Association. Dr. Doig states very clearly that the Canadian system is imploding. Your view also seems to differ a lot from that of two of my Canadian friends who recently traveled to the U.S. for urgent surgery because they could not be scheduled soon enough in Canada. Perhaps you have also not read The Castonguay Report by Claude Castonguay, the father of Quebec Medicare.

Dr. R

August 28th, 2009
10:26 am

Those who favor single-payer nationalized health care can make the case all they want about how practical, cost-effective, efficient and fair it might be. Surely there is plenty of evidence to the contrary, and we can have the debate on that basis. But even if I were convinced that such a system were superior, I would oppose it. I do not want to live my life depending on government to provide my basic needs that I cannot provide for myself. Government should print money, pave the roads, ensure public safety and pretty much get out of my life after that. When I turn 65, I’m going to have to decide how to get around using Medicare and Social Security, programs that I have paid into all my life but do not support otherwise. I’m hoping I have enough of a nest egg to say “no, thank you.” I don’t think my children and others of their generation should pay their hard-earned tax money for my subsistence, any more than I care to do so now. I am an American and I believe in liberty, not “it takes a village.” I don’t want charity from anyone. If I can’t provide it for myself, I will do without. And that goes for health care as well. I would rather perish a free man than exist as a ward of the state.

Melissa

August 28th, 2009
10:29 am

Dear Frank: See competition to Amtrak or the Post Office? Not really. One because its against the law and two, it wouldn’t be viable for a private company to enter that market.

FYI – There is mass competition with Amtrak and the USPS: Greyhound and other ground and air based transportation services, owned by Laidlaw, a Canandian based publicly traded corporation. UPS and FedEx compete against the USPS quite successfully. It is not against the law for a private company to compete with a Government owned corporation. There are plenty of companies that currently compete in both the private sector of transportation and postal services.

ryanv

August 28th, 2009
10:29 am

Why are folks discussing a single payer system? It’s not on the table. You can’t argue against the current plan so you toss red herrings. Let’s just get the health care plan in without the repubs. Lord knows they didn’t care if we were with them. Show some backbone, get it passed, and move on.

ncgreybr

August 28th, 2009
10:31 am

The population of Canada is about 34,000,000. 17,500 came to the US for medical care. That is about one in every 2,000 who is obviously not satisfied with Canadian healthcare.

Are 1,999 out of 2,000 Americans satisfied with American healthcare?

I guess I must have missed the part about the fact that we are REQUIRED to have Canadian healthcare. Why not take the best ideas from Canada, the best from England, the best from Japan and make our OWN healthcare system?

lovelyliz

August 28th, 2009
10:37 am

How wrong can 1.5 million Americans be? Yes, that’sillion.

In August 2008 Deliotte Consulting estimated that 1.5 milion Americans that year were traveling to other countries for medical procedures and not all of them are for breast implants. They estimate that in the next decade this number would increase 10 fold.

Per capita, that’s a whole lot higher than the number of Canadians coming to the US.

Chris Salzmann

August 28th, 2009
10:41 am

Bob, thousands of Americans travel to India, Mexico etc. to get access to reasonably priced health care. BTW, my wife had to wait 2 months to see a specialist here in Atlanta. Yeah, I’m sure Canadians travel over here, and I’m sure everyone of them paid in cash. Will that change here with the introduction of health care insurance reforms? Especially since these reforms will provide a government option for those who are already NOT INSURED or UNDER-INSURED. Most Americans will not know the difference. Sure, there will me mandates requiring insurance companies to allow for pre-existing conditions. How’s that a bad thing? That mandate already exists for employer provided health insurance plans.

Your talk about a single payer government controlled system simply does not make any sense since that isn’t going to happen here. Private insurance companies will continue to operate, with certain long overdue and humanitarian mandate. Lets put it this way: we are required by law to carry a certain level of insurance on our vehicles but nothing mandating that for human beings.

Lastly Bob, here’s a little survey about what our neighbors up in the North feel about their health care system. To summarize, the poll, by Angus Reid Strategies, found that 65 percent of Canadians have a “very positive” or “moderately positive” impression of single-payer health care in their country. A whopping 79 percent of Canadians have a negative opinion of health care in “the United States”. So with all their problems, they still don’t want our system. That should speak volumes. In fact, I’ll challenge you to show me a single poll from any of the top industrialized country where, as you call it, “socialized” medicine is practiced, that want our system. Show me a single poll!!!

The article I pulled that poll from can be found here:

http://blog.seattlepi.com/seattlepolitics/archives/175523.asp

ncgreybr

August 28th, 2009
10:42 am

We have perfect healthcare here. I had to wait for 3 weeks for a doctor’s appointment for leg pain. After I got to see him, he recommended a specialist. A month wait. After I got to see him, he recommended two hip replacements. He’ll be able to do them in January. If my insurance company doesn’t cancel me.

Now…tell me again how bad Canada is.

Trudy

August 28th, 2009
10:50 am

Population of Canada is 33,739,000. So 33,721,500 people DID NOT come to the US for health care.

Bob Barr, you are a fool.

Dr. R

August 28th, 2009
10:52 am

Mandating who private insurance companies can and can’t cover is simply going to drive prices up further. If the companies are forced to lose money on those who submit huge claims, they’ll be forced to pass those costs on to the rest of us. So much for cutting health inflation. I would not oppose a low-level public option, perhaps even funded by local municipalities instead of the feds, that gives uninsured people and the self-employed a safety net option. Such a system would be paid for with tax money, as Medicaid is now, but would not be as costly by requiring everyone to take part.

As for doctor waits here and abroad, get over it. Doctors aren’t Burger King; you don’t drive up to the window and order what you need and expect it waiting. If you’re in bad shape, go to the ER. Baby boomers and younger expect their every need to be met within seconds or they start hollering. Get over yourselves just once.

GS

August 28th, 2009
10:54 am

Why not tell us the rest of the facts, Bob? 750,000 Americans went abroad for health care in 2007. World-class hospitals and an abundance of highly trained doctors and nurses offer outstanding care that equals the best in America at far lower cost. Why don’t you mention that? Well, we know the reason. As always, your column is about ideology, not facts.

Haliburton Billionaire

August 28th, 2009
10:54 am

Please let’s not get started with this Liberal vs. Conservative debacle. Are you partisan idiots aware that BOTH PARTIES HAVE INSURANCE LOBBYIST MONEY IN THEIR POCKETS?!?! I swear partisanship will be the ultimate demise of this country. SHEEP!

Haliburton Billionaire

August 28th, 2009
11:01 am

GTMike-
Please sit down and SHUT UP. All of these ails of our country that you mentioned came under the “reign” of your beloved George W Bush. Remember there was a SURPLUS before this clown took office. No one complained when billions upon billions of dollars went toward “liberating” ANOTHER country. No one had a word to say. Now, we’re up in arms about making sure our OWN are taken care of?!?!?! For Christ’s sake DOES ANYONE SEE WHAT’S WRONG WITH THIS PICTURE????

WTF

August 28th, 2009
11:03 am

God forbid any of you conservative knuckleheads ever lose your livelihood and end up with some form of cancer or chronic disease or have to watch your children suffer from something like Lupus and have no medical coverage. Then you will see just how compassionate your fellow “bash any idea that isn’t a conservative idea” friends are. I’ve watched what losing coverage can do – and when you have to bury family members because insurance dictated their death by declining coverage maybe you’ll change your tune as well. The only way that any health reform with ever happen in this country is if everyone in the house and senate and white house drop their top notch lifetime coverage for them and their dependents and then deal with the bs that normal Americans deal with.

The Devil's Adversary

August 28th, 2009
11:03 am

Gee, who do I want managing my healthcare? A crooked politican or an even more crooked insurance company?

Loki in Toronto

August 28th, 2009
11:06 am

Mr. Barr – that’s just plain dumb and one-sided. From what I have read, over 1 million Americans go outside the US for healthcare every year and many of them come to Canada. I work for the government in Ontario, Canada and we have over 30 million health cards issued. We are working to cancel these and re-issue them because you know what – there are only 13 million people who live here. Many of the cards are just dead cards – but a huge number are used by Americans coming here to get free health care. And you can bet they don’t report that at the border on their return so that it becomes an official statistic.

One of the reasons that waiting times are so long here in Canada is because of Americans coming here and illegally using our health care system. No one wants to talk publicly about that because it’s an ugly truth and if Ontarians and Canadians knew the extent they would be outraged. And you can try to argue – but I know of what I speak.

So you know what – take care of your own – we can’t afford this anymore.

CJ

August 28th, 2009
11:07 am

17,500 is only 5% of the Canadian population. Using this argument, policy should be based on 5% of the population.
Well, gay people represent 10% of the population, so we all should DEFINITELY have more rights using Barr’s math!
Good grief. Go get a valid argument, would ya?

Loki in Toronto

August 28th, 2009
11:10 am

Also – 5% of Canadians would be 1.7 million, not 17 million.

jconservative

August 28th, 2009
11:17 am

Michael Smith August 28th, 2009 9:23 am

In this comment you made one of the better cases for a reform of the health care system I have read. Good job.

Look, any day now we are going to have 100 million US citizens on Medicare, Medicade & SCHIP. Then add in the veterans receiving care at VA hospitals. We will have 33% of the US population on a single payer (government) system.

So we need to do something. We will do nothing if there is not a compromise. And this is a tough climate for compromise. Both the left & the right are deeply entrenched. The center is to small to do anything on its own.

Prediction: we will be where we are today in 2012. Except that 38% of the population will be on a single payer (government) system as the baby boomers born in 1946 & 1947 become eligible for Medicare & more kids get on SCHIP.

You folks are smart enough to see where this is heading I trust?

glenn

August 28th, 2009
11:18 am

Hey Bob , how many Americans get their pharmaceuticals from Canada because they can get them so much cheaper across the border or in many instances couldn’t afford to get them in this country at all ? I bet it is much more than 17,500 . Bob the whole globe has a version of universal healthcare & most citizens in most countries are satisfied with it . Is Canada the best you can do ? I’m surprised you didn’t bring up Great Britain like all the other no answer just fear chuckleheads . Healthcare is 16 percent of our GDP now & many economists say it could hit 25 percent next decade . What is your answer ? Please enlighten me . How do you deal with an antitrust exempt healthcare provider cartel that is bleeding our system ? Enlighten me . You know very well you won’t be able to regulate them & since they are anti trust exempt competition is out of the question as well . Even you free marketers have no dog in this fight . I want to hear a realistic answer on how to deal with our healthcare crisis instead of pointing fingers at other countries .

Chris Salzmann

August 28th, 2009
11:21 am

The Lemmer August 28th, 2009 9:48 am SAID: No one here (unless I missed it) is talking about the real problem. Healthcare costs in this country will be lowered when Congress passes a powerful TORT REFORM LAW!!!

CHRIS SAYS: TORT reform will not work as currently implemented in some states. Texas is one of them and insurance costs have not gone down. What is required is what they currently have in the UK. Anyone can sue anybody but the loser incurs all the legal costs involved including legal fees paid by the defending party. This means that lawyers are a lot more selective about the cases they take on because if they lose, they along with their clients, will be responsible for all the legal fees involved. This system strongly discourages legal fishing expeditions and ambulance chasing.

Naturally, this won’t happen here since the legal lobby is well represented in Washington DC.

Obummers 1st 100 days

August 28th, 2009
11:22 am

Observations of the President’s 1st 100 Days:

1.. Offended the Queen of England

2. Bowed to the King of Saudi Arabia

3. Praised the Marxist Daniel Ortega

4. Kissed Hugo Chavez on the cheek

5. Endorsed the Socialist Evo Morales of Bolivia

6. Announced we would meet with Iranians with no pre-conditions

7. Gave away billions to AIG, also without pre-conditions

8. Expanded the bailouts

9. Insulted everyone who has ever loved a Special Olympian

10. Doubled our national debt

11. Announced a termination of the space defense system the day after the North Koreans launched an ICBM.

12. Despite the urgings of his own CIA director and the prior 42 CIA directors, released information on intelligence gathering. Announced major restrictions on interrogation techniques used on enemy combatant prisoners.

13. Accepted without public comment the fact that five of his cabinet members cheated on their taxes and two other appointees withdrew after they couldn’t take the heat.

14. Appointed a Homeland Security Chief who quickly identified as “dangers to the nation”, groups including veterans of the military, and opponents to abortion on demand, and who ordered that the wordterrorism no longer be used but instead referred to such acts as man made disasters.

15. Circled the globe so he could openly apologize for America ’s greatness.

16. Told Mexicans the violence in their country was mostly caused by illegal guns from the U.S.

17. Politicized the census by moving it into the White House from its Department of Commerce origins and announced ACORN [the organization under massive scrutiny amid allegations of election fraud] would manage the process.

18. Appointed as Attorney General the man who orchestrated the forced removal and expulsion from America to Cuba of a nine-year old whose mother died trying to bring him to a life of freedom in the United States .

19. Salutes as heroes three Navy SEALS who took down three terrorists who threatened one American life and the next day announces members of the Bush administration will likely stand trial for torturing a terrorist who had played a part in killing 3000 Americans by pouring water over his face.

20. Air Force One flew over New York City for a photo op without notifying local authorities causing widespread panic.

21. Took over the American Automobile industry and handed over 50% off to the unions [because he said he owed them].

22. Continued his drive for absolute gun control activities, thumbing his nose at the 2nd Amendment.

23. Offered travel and living subsidies in the U.S. to Hamas activists displaced from the Gaza Strip.

24. Got more airtime [TV] than Oprah Winfrey and was seldom in Washington tending to the business of State.

25. Announced the closure of enemy combatants detention center in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba but failed to address the issue of ‘what’ to do with the 200+ prisoners currently held there. Rumors persist that they’ll be housed on U.S. soil…

Other than that, we’re doing just fine.

Only 1360 more FRIGHTENING days to go…

JSon

August 28th, 2009
11:23 am

Why do the Republicans complain on and on about how bad the governemnt is and how it can’t do anything efficiently, yet then they turn around and say that if we actually allowed a public option to compete with the corporate insurance co. plan, it would drive them out of business?

Factchecker

August 28th, 2009
11:27 am

“about 12,500 Canadians have come here for health care” – Source please? I would be inclined to induce that this figure comes either from Mr. Barr’s imagination or else it includes Canadian tourists (of which there are about 17 million each year – http://tinet.ita.doc.gov/view/f-2000-99-001/forecast/Data%20Tables%20for%20Country%20Forecasts.pdf).

“In Canada, get in line behind the five percent of the population waiting to get a primary care physician (about 17 million Canadians)” – Mr. Barr is obviously ignorant of even the most basic of facts. With his formula, Canada’s population would be about 340 million (35 million more than the U.S.)! Do you critics know the actual population of Canada? Might want to learn the basics before opining and ranting…

Dr. R

August 28th, 2009
11:28 am

I did have an uninsured older child involved in a health incident a few years ago. Because of his age, my insurance no longer covered him. So I made arrangements with the hospital and doctors and made payments over a period of several months. It means I gave up some luxuries like a nice vacation and eating out, but I didn’t complain. Life is not fair and no one owes us anything. As soon as you come to grips with that, you’ll find it easier to deal with the difficulties that come your way without looking around to tap someone else’s hard-earned cash. I’ll say it again: I’ll pay my own way or do without. That’s how this nation’s pioneers founded this country and I don’t need you or anyone else to bail me out of my problems now or in the future.

Kevin

August 28th, 2009
11:28 am

Around 2001, I lived in Amsterdam. I woke up one morning to find my jaw had completely locked up– I have minor TMJ issue. I couldn’t open my mouth more than 1/2 inch, and I was in terrible pain.

In the Netherlands, you must see your “family physician” before seeing ANY specialist. I didn’t have a family doc there. I found a maxilio-facial specialist, and went to see him without an appointment. I asked the receptionist if I could see the doc. “Not without a referral”, I was told. I offered to pay cash, on the spot, to see the doc. Her response? “That is not possible.” You literally cannot buy private care in the Netherlands.

I flew to London where I found a private physician that would see me.

For this reason, I will NEVER support a government healthcare plan. It may start as an “option” but will surely evolve into a system similar to the one I endured.