Why the NCAA got it right in the Cameron Newton case

There are a lot of people in Athens, Ga., Tuscaloosa, Ala., and Los Angeles, Calif. who are going to get mad at this statement. But here it goes:

Based on what  its investigators have determined, the NCAA got it right with Wednesday’s ruling on Cameron Newton.

Early Wednesday afternoon the NCAA announced that Auburn’s quarterback was eligible to play immediately. That statement became necessary because on Monday the NCAA determined that a violation of amateurism rules occured when Newton’s father had conversations with a former Mississippi State player about a possible pay-for-play scheme. The NCAA informed Auburn of this and the school, as it must, declared Newton ineligible on Tuesday (How they kept that secret is amazing). Auburn petitioned the NCAA to reinstate Newton as soon as possible. The NCAA  committee that determines these types of things granted that reinstatement on Wednesday.

That was the process.

The NCAA enforcement staff has been investigating this case since last summer. Here are their findings as of Monday:

**–Newton’s father and the owner of a scouting service (various media reports have identified this man as former Mississippi State player Kenny Rogers) had conversations about a possible play-for-pay deal for the son’s services.

**–Cameron Newton had no knowledge his father’s actions.

**–Neither Auburn University nor anyone representing its athletics interests had any involvement in or was aware of the activity between Cecil Newton and Kenny Rogers.

That’s it.

Now if you’re a Georgia fan and you saw A.J. Green lose four games for selling a jersey, you think there is a double standard. Same at Alabama, where Marcell Dareus sat two games for accepting travel expenses to attend that infamous agent’s party in South Florida. At USC they are wondering why they got hammered. From the Trojans’ perspective Reggie Bush’s parents had their hands out just like Cecil Newton. All Cecil Newton got was limited access to the Auburn football program in the future. Big deal.

They are thinking that a high-profile player (Newton) and a high-profile league (SEC) got a pass from the NCAA  just three days before a high-profile team (Auburn) played in a high-profile game (SEC championship) that was worth a lot of money to everyone concerned. This also had to get tidied up because the Heisman Trophy is going to be presented a week from Saturday (Dec. 11) and how uncomfortable would it be for the winner not to talk to the media?

I get all that. In the internet age nothing just happens anymore. Nobody just looks at a set of facts and makes a decision. It is always part of a vast conspiracy to keep the rich and powerful in their positions of wealth and power and to keep somebody else down. There are always larger forces at work.

There is a big difference between the three cases above and the Newton case. In those cases there was a finding of FACT that money and extra benefits actually changed hands. Green admitted he received $1,000 for the jersey (whether or not that should be a violation is a different argument). Dareus admitted that somebody paid his way to South Florida. It took a four years but the the NCAA proved, to its satisfaction, that almost $300,000 in benefits went to Bush or his parents.

In the Newton case, the father solicted money either directly or indirectly in his conversations with Rogers and, at this point, there is no evidence that money or extra benefits ever changed hands.

Now a lot of you are simply not going to believe that the kid did not know what the father was up to. A lot of you refuse to believe that Cecil Newton and his contact only solicted money from one school (Mississippi State) which said no. A lot of you believe this ruling  just opens the door for parents to sell their sons to the highest bidder–as long as they keep their talented sons in the dark. I can’t tell you how many people told me on Wednesday that this was a “slippery slope.”

Maybe it is. But remember that a slippery slope can slide both ways. If the NCAA punished School A because a father solicted money from School B (and no money changed hands and school A didn’t even know the solicitation took place), now you have another slippery slope where the possibilities are endless. If I’m a recruiter at school B and lost a recruit to school A, when the head coach starts chewing on my butt I can just put it out there that the parent solicited money from me and get school A in trouble and take the heat off me.

The fact is that on Wednesday the NCAA issued a very narrow ruling in an area where there is a gap in its legislation. We know that the mere solicitation is a violation of amateurism rules, which is why Auburn had to suspend Newton on Tuesday. An NCAA representative told me the knowledge, or the lack thereof, of the athlete is a “mitigating factor” in whether or not the athlete is eventually reinstated.

But can you punish a school that is not involved in that solicitation simply because the athlete chose that school? Do you at least have to have evidence that the school did something wrong?  Eventually, the NCAA will have to get some clarity on this issue.

Now could the facts on the ground change? Could there be evidence uncovered in the future that contradicts the current findings of the NCAA enforcement staff? Of course.

But the NCAA can only make its ruling based on what it knows today. Because of the unique nature of this case, the NCAA owed it to everybody involved to get some kind of resolution if it was possible. Thus, Newton is eligible to play on Saturday against South Carolina.

One more thing. A number of you sent me this rule from the SEC’s bylaws:

 
14.01.3.3. Financial Aid. If at any time before or after matriculation in a member institution a student-athlete or
any member of his/her family receives or agrees to receive, directly or indirectly, any aid or assistance beyond or in
addition to that permitted by the Bylaws of this Conference (except such aid or assistance as such student-athlete
may receive from those persons on whom the student is naturally or legally dependent for support), such student-athlete
shall be ineligible for competition in any intercollegiate sport within the Conference for the remainder of
his/her college career.

I checked with the SEC and the rule above does not apply in the Newton case. That’s because the key passage is: “AGREES to receive, directly or indirectly.” In this case there is evidence that Cecil Newton, directly or indirectly, SOLICITED extra benefits. There is no evidence, at this point, that there was an agreement (such as a handshake agreement) by one party to pay and another party to receive an extra benefit.

If it is ever proven that Cecil Newton agreed to receive money instead of just talking about it, then we have a whole new ball game. But until that day comes, the NCAA has to apply the rules as written. Stuff like this is why the NCAA bylaws look like a copy of the Manhattan phone book. Those rules are going to have to grow in order to account for this case. And until it does, the kid gets to play.

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872 comments Add your comment

Dr. Dawg

December 2nd, 2010
8:40 am

Sometimes it takes a special case to have the rules changed or modified. Sometimes they just get it wrong (see O.J. Simpson). The NCAA has found that “at this time” no evidence has been found linking Cam to his dirty Dad’s under-the-table-dealings. Although cleared for now, it ain’t over ’til it’s over. The investigation goes on. It was quite some time before the NCAA caught Reggie Bush & Co. with the goods. A new ‘Cam Newton’ rule may eventually be written.

Thing is, even if Cam is eventually found complicit, he simply turns pro (like he’s going to anyway) and rides off into the sunset with a big fat pro contract leaving behind some devastated school(s). Seems very little justice will be served if this thing eventually goes south.

Nick Fairley

December 2nd, 2010
8:41 am

Seriously . . . .

December 2nd, 2010
8:33 am

http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/columns/story?columnist=wojciechowski_gene&id=5872192&sportCat=ncf

According to ESPN, you are wrong Tony, they add, this is not a slap on the wrist, its a wet kiss on the ring finger . . .
——

No, according to ESPN Cam is eligible to play. According to Woj he’s got issues with it. He’s a commentator, not ESPN. He’s a columnist, see below. He doesn’t like it. So be it. What he wanted to have happen didn’t happen and he’s opining about it.

Gene Wojciechowski is the senior national columnist for ESPN.com. You can contact him at gene.wojciechowski@espn.com. Hear Gene’s podcasts and ESPN Radio appearances by clicking here.

3rdN8

December 2nd, 2010
8:42 am

Time for the NCAA/SEC conspiracy theorists to calm down.

For a well conceived conspiracy to work, there has to be limited access to the workings of the conspiracy itself. Even if access is limited to two or three people, it is hard to keep secure for an extended period.

There are 120 Div I football teams, and 12 SEC football teams. Do you people really think this type of endeavor could be kept quiet….say….past lunchtime?

Coaches, and ADs come and go all of the time….in and out of college football. SOMEONE would have written a book by now.

My A$$

December 2nd, 2010
8:42 am

We…

when did you suit up and play?

Atlanta Gator

December 2nd, 2010
8:46 am

Like Tony, and I suspect the SEC and NCAA lawyers who reviewed this case, when I read the NCAA bylaw involved, I place emphasis on the word “agree.” According to all available evidence, neither Cam Newton nor his father actually received any money from anyone associated with the Mississippi State football program, but did Cecil Newton “agree” to accept money for his son’s services?

Well, no, apparently not. To “agree” to something implies an agreement between two people, a contract, a meeting of the minds, in short, the striking of a deal that both parties accepted and acknowledged. Here, the available evidence contradicts the existence of any agreement between the Newtons and anyone associated with Mississippi State. Cecil Newton admittedly made such any offer of pay-for-play for his son’s services to the MSU recruiters, but the MSU recruiters rejected any such deal. Therefore, there was no agreement.

The Rev. Cecil Newton admittedly made an offer to MSU recruiters which violated NCAA and SEC bylaws. Cecil is a dirt bag. There is no available evidence, however, that Cecil made a similar offer to Auburn recruiters, and even less evidence that AU recruiters accepted any such pay-for-play deal. Auburn has apparently banned the father from any normal contact with the AU football program.

The whole episode leaves a funny smell lingering over Cameron Newton’s college football career, but my reading of the facts and the SEC and NCAA bylaws is that the SEC and NCAA acted appropriately, proportionately and in accordance with a literal reading of their own bylaws and the available evidence.

Sorry, folks, but you can’t produce evidence that can’t find or mete on punishments for an “agreement” that all available evidence suggests did not exist. The only remaining question is whether the quick reinstatement of Cam Newton’s NCAA eligibility was appropriate and consistent with prior NCAA precedent, and I will leave that to others upon which to comment . . . .

Fakey McFake

December 2nd, 2010
8:47 am

Nice to see you are on the right side of this, Tony. Especially after your self-righteous, arrogant rant about the evils in college football at halftime during the UGA-AU game. That was a regrettable speech.

RAPbama

December 2nd, 2010
8:48 am

Cam needs to declare innocence at the Heisman ceremony. If he is innocent, why not tell us and put it to bed. This whole thing is sad. Still, I hope Auburn wins the SEC and BCS. AU fans are sleeping better but not as well as they would like.

Bud

December 2nd, 2010
8:49 am

I say do away with the NCAA and all the game officials. Put a huge wire cage around all the fields and have one big free for all. No holes barred. No time clock. Nobody stopping the consumptiom of alcohol and drugs by the fans. You can bring firearms if you want. Man that would be fun.

Chris

December 2nd, 2010
8:50 am

Tony, you’re in bed with the NCAA just like Schultz… Why can’t we get a reporter to actually ask the tough questions? This is beyond corrupt…

godoggo

December 2nd, 2010
8:50 am

Seriously…… GREAT comments above

Now….i don’t have a dog in this fight but, it smells of rotten fish. Even though Scam will be on the field playing, there still lies the fact that the NCAA investigation @ and at Auburn will continue. When Colonial Bank failed it gave Carte Blanche to the Feds to look at any and all accounts and records. My source has told me that the entire Scam Newton” issue will look like a footnote compared to the enitre story. Pat Dye was on the board there forever…..if you don’t believe me, go sit outside AU’s legal office at night…there burning the candle working on the forest fire to come :)

Finally, if you believe Scam did not know what his Dad was doing, you’ve gotta pull your head outta the sand…..him having to jump from one school to the next because they didn’t offer upper-level classes in how to water lawns, or elite Physical Ed is suspect in itself……along with the “computer toss” incident….don’t they do that with Punkins too ? Sure, he’ll sign with the Raiders, get ka-ching, and all the skanky Caucasian woman he wants…..but im sure his low level character, choices, and moral compass will continue to run in the gutter……Remember what they say about a Preacher’s kid……the sometimes are the worst in the bunch, and Scam has already shown his true colors….and no im not being a racist or a bigot.

Bigot: def. noun, “a person who is winning an argument with a liberal”.

Holler if ya hear me ???

pete

December 2nd, 2010
8:50 am

Asking for $$$$ means you are agreeing to take it. Clear as a bell. Mike Slive is wrong on this one.

Michael

December 2nd, 2010
8:50 am

This ruling is everything that is wrong with college football. I am ashamed of Tony Barnhart coming down on the side of the NCAA and Cam ( I know nothing) Newton. This ruling DOES open the door for parents to pimp their sons (which I believe Barnhart said there was a certain part of Hell for parents like that), and it allows the player to get away with it simply by saying, “I know nothing about it.” In this case, if you believe that I have some great land to sell you! Cam does not do ANYTHING unless his father tells him to. That has been reported, are you telling me with a straight face that Cam did not know anything about what his father was doing? REALLY? REALLY?
The NCAA did this for one reason and that is money. The SEC, National Championship, and the Heisman Trophy has now, with this ruling, become about nothing but making money and television ratings. If Cam gets the Heisman, and they may as well just mail it to him, it justifies EVERY wrong thing that has ever happened in college football. This is a travesty.

Another Ed

December 2nd, 2010
8:51 am

Unless you are a huge Auburn fan (and I know there are some that think logically) you must say this is a bit fishy. If Cam did nothing wrong at all, why declare him ineligible? A violation of Cam’s amateur status occurred, so is he not ineligible for a long time? At what time has the NCAA ever moved so quickly? They take several weeks to decide on what to order for lunch. A 20 or so year old guy is ordered to go to a school instead of going where he wishes and he does not ask why?

I don’t think anyone is angry with Cam. He is a tremendous football player, and hopefully has turned his life around. Isn’t this all a bit too good to be true? I know the investigation is not over. I know nothing has been tied to Auburn. Auburn is undefeated and playing for the conference title.
And now it looks like most of the country thinks this smells also. If it is good to have the attitude of “us against the world” then Auburn is now in that situation.

I know people believe what they want to believe. As for Auburn fans you can “believe” all you want. Others will “believe” all they want. Hopefully the actual truth will some day come out.

meh

December 2nd, 2010
8:51 am

Cecil agreed to take $180,000. MSU apparently didn’t give it to him, but he sure as hell agreed to take it.

Paul

December 2nd, 2010
8:52 am

I thought is was made pretty clear at the beginning of this that AU was aware that this happened at Miss ST, did their own investigation, and determined to bring in $CAM anyway. So to say that AU knew nothing about this is incorrect. There is still no clarity around $CAM’s comments to Miss St. “I sorry, the money was just too much.” Then going to play at AU. Surely a reporter will ask that question after the SEC Championship. I bet the answer will still be no comment because the investigation is still ongoing. I still believe that there is incriminating evidence on the FBI tapes that cannot be made public yet because of pending bribery case involving AU boosters. The FBI and prosecutors of that case cannot risk any of that information becoming public yet for fear that it may lead to an unfair trial in the state of Alabama.

Tom

December 2nd, 2010
8:52 am

Tony, very thoughtful column. Thank you for being a journalist first and college football celebrity second.

Robert W. Peoples

December 2nd, 2010
8:53 am

What a bunch of whiners (DawginLex;MyA$$;ARdawg;JdawgT and Seriously) from a school (UGA) that is infested with misfits and a coach who has no control of his program or players. At the present time they are the most pathetic team in the SEC. They so thought they were going to beat us when the score was 21-7 but we just tore their hearts out and all they can do is whine.

meh

December 2nd, 2010
8:54 am

also, I don’t think old Cecil would just ask one school for money and not any others. the NCAA will keep looking and they will find something.

The Barn is Burning

December 2nd, 2010
8:55 am

Whatever Tony, why don’t you get off your knees, close your mouth, and open your eyes to the situation here. It is evident that you, along with Slive, are doing your best to protect AU and the Camburglar. Too late though; no one will ever respect what’s going on here and what is accomplished on the field, however legit that may be.

Please come back when every recruit’s daddy or uncle has their hand out during the process, and uses the excuse that “Cam (or whomever) didn’t know I was asking for money.” What kind of precedent does that set? This is wildly inconsistent with every action the NCAA has ever taken in the past. Just a shame, a real shame.

Ryno

December 2nd, 2010
8:55 am

If he was ineligible for one day at AU, then he was ineligible as soon as he stepped on campus. They will have to forfeit all the games this season for using an eligible player.
AU declared hiim ineligible Tuesday. Done deal, end of story.
His daddy shopped him to MSU, so he’s ineligible no matter where he goes.

pete

December 2nd, 2010
8:55 am

Man, Tony had to go write this. Can we say he graduated from Auburn or Florida and not UGA? Embarrassment Tony, you flip flop so much!

georgia87

December 2nd, 2010
8:56 am

A headline for TrishaDishaWarEagle and all those who claim it is UGA sour grapes….

The University of Georgia announced today that Reggie Bush has been recruited to play for the Bulldogs during the 2011 season. Bush left USC early and still has NCAA eligibility remaining. His body is obviously not suited to the NFL game, but has been uniquely proven to excel at the college level.

Meanwhile, the rest of the SEC are up in arms about the impending signing. “He shouldn’t be allowed to play for Georgia. NCAA violations were found at another school”, stated one unnamed SEC coach. However, the NCAA ruled that since the violations occurred at another school, he is eligible to play at UGA. There have been allegations of Bush being paid to play football. Since all the documents are private, the NCAA has no proof, seeing that they have no subpoena power. However, the NCAA has ruled that since Georgia did not pay Bush, he is eligible to play at the school.

The Georgia fans are giddy at the possibilities of Aaron Murray having such a great weapon available in the offense. Even AJ Green, citing the Bush signing and the impending NFL lockout, has decided to remain in school one more year. Pundits have pegged the Dawgs as early SEC East favorites, if they can work out their defensive problems.

Is this OK with the Auburn fans? You understand, right?

SWGADAWG

December 2nd, 2010
8:56 am

“They are thinking that a high-profile player (Newton) and a high-profile league (SEC) got a pass from the NCAA just three days before a high-profile team (Auburn) played in a high-profile game (SEC championship) that was worth a lot of money to everyone concerned. This also had to get tidied up because the Heisman Trophy is going to be presented a week from Saturday (Dec. 11) and how uncomfortable would it be for the winner not to talk to the media”

BINGO…..Tony, read the NCAA bylaws. There is no question about what the bylaws say. Same with AJ or Bush or Bama’s guy…no question. The NCAA has lost it’s way and should now go away. The door to money for players is wide open. I think I’ll try that “I didn’t know” the next time I get pulled over. The most sickening part to me is that a Preacher and his family are the crooks……

TrishaDishaWarEagle

December 2nd, 2010
8:56 am

Amen, RWP..they still whine about Fairley and how they would never want him on their team, and he keeps moving up into the top 5 draft status based on his kick a** play…If Fairley played for UGA, first off he would probably have been arrested by now to keep the team tradition alive, and he would be the #1 fan favorite as the best player on their team..

ShellDawg

December 2nd, 2010
8:58 am

I agree that Auburn shouldn’t be punished for a solicitation which it had nothing to do with. So fine. Don’t punish Auburn U. Punish the Newtons by suspending the player. This will encourage future student athletes to DISCOURAGE their parents from seeking bribes. As in, “Hey – Pops -don’t do that – I don’t want to get suspended from my future team and disqualified from a Heisman Race. I’ll make plent of money in the NFL – don’t do this.”

Richie

December 2nd, 2010
8:58 am

The NCAA has open a big can of worms…….What is college Football coming too……

KITTYKATKILLER

December 2nd, 2010
8:59 am

You are wrong Tony way off the NCAA would have never made such a terse statement as they did before the UGA game if they had not intended to disqualify him ,and they expected AU do follow their guide.But in my opinion AU couldnt because they knew papa and Cam would sing like canaries.So AU put out a gag order ,and got their lies straight Papa fesses up and Cam plays stupid.The problem with your analysis is this Tony NOBODY BELIEVES Cam did not know not the NCAA NOT YOU ,I HOPE not AU grads ANYYYYYONE SO THIS MAKES HIM INELIGIBLE RIGHT? AHHHHHHHHHHHHHH I SEE YEA forgot that tiddy bit didnt you? Just because the NCAA cant prove he dosent know believe me one thing they are seething at AU for lawyering up on this and not sitting Cam and one thing you dont do Tony ,ask Gene Stallings his make the NCAA MAD Tony you are way off on this one. Cam is a Thug and a liar.

ARdawg

December 2nd, 2010
8:59 am

MURPH

Answering your Q from yesterday, Yes I have seen that kid. He’s good. Their coach just got wacked btw

Dr. Phil

December 2nd, 2010
8:59 am

Good assessment, Tony. An interesting aspect of this whole situation is, MS State did not report the solicitation until AFTER Cam signed with Auburn and then dragged its feet with the SEC inquiry until August. Perhaps State’s refusal to meet Cecil’s “payment schedule” frightened Rev. Newton into silence with other schools. Deep Throat said “follow the money.” It is hard to hide, as President Nixon learned, and in Newton’s case, there seems to be no money trail.

meh

December 2nd, 2010
8:59 am

if Cam gets off because he “didn’t know” what his dad was doing then AJ shouldn’t have been suspended for 4 games because he didn’t know the guy who bought his jersey was an “agent”.

shane

December 2nd, 2010
9:01 am

You think USC will bring this up at their appeal hearing? Hum? I bet they are working overtime on this as we speak.

Worm

December 2nd, 2010
9:01 am

Auburn, You have now become the most hated program in the Nation..I hope you enjoy this run because the highest highs are never as great as the lowest lows…And you’ve lost all respect and have some LOW days ahead..

TrishaDishaWarEagle

December 2nd, 2010
9:02 am

And one last note before I get back to work..

IF we win the SEC and IF we win the NC, it won’t matter one bit to me or lessen it one bit if other teams fans don’t like it…It’s a little like politics..the more the left wing whines about something, the more I like that something..and the more people outside AU who bash her, the more I love her.

Emily Jordan

December 2nd, 2010
9:07 am

Why do you people hate Cam Newton so much? Think about it for a moment. What is the root of your feelings about him? Unbelievable how you have a thirst to see his blood. You go on and on and on about how terrible he is and how Auburn is so corrupt. You speak of things you know nothing about. Examine yourself today. Ask yourself why you are so extremely outraged about a young, talented football player who spends time with “at risk” elementary kids every week encouraging them to be respectful and do their best. Then ask yourself why in comparison, it has never crossed your mind to be outraged at something so horrendous as abortion…the murder of innocent, helpless babies every day that you live. Examine your priorities. If you must be outraged about something…make it something that really matters. Drop the witch hunt of Cam Newton and do something important with your life. He’s admitted that he’s made mistakes and he’s worked hard to do the right thing. Take a lesson.

Robert W. Peoples

December 2nd, 2010
9:07 am

Whine, whine, whine. You lost, we won. There is nothing more to the story. All you uGAY fans mentality has lowered itself to that of your coach. Talk about a bunch of thugs – you rule the roost. I know of no one, except Ugay fans that have any respect for your program at this time. It has become the laughing stock of the SEC. You recruit all those highly rated players but they don’t produce because most arae busy trying to get out of jail.

roy jones

December 2nd, 2010
9:09 am

Tony (and Slive) are correct…an “agreement” is a two-way street and has to be “agreed upon” by two separate parties. If I knock on your door and ask you for your car and all of the money in your bank account we do not have an “agreement”.
georgia 87 said” If Mr. Newton solicited funds, that is an implicit agreement to receive them” that argument makes no sense, an AGREEMENT IS A TWO WAY STREET

Auburn | MrSEC.com

December 2nd, 2010
9:10 am

[...] (The nerve of these hacks.  Not a journalist in the lot!)7.  Tony Barnhart of The AJC writes that the NCAA got it right in the Newton case. 8.  The website SportsByBrooks writes that Damon Stoudamire’s situation at Arizona in 1995 [...]

FSUTiger

December 2nd, 2010
9:11 am

Tony, with the Albert Means case:

1. Money was solicited by his high school coaches from the Univ of Alabama in order to steer him there
2. Means signed letter of intent, and attended/played for Univ of Alabama
3. Means declared ineligible at Univ of Alabama
4. Means transfers to and is declared eligible at the Univ of Memphis

Wouldn’t that case be pertinent in the Cam Newton case and provide precedence? I fully believe if Cam Newton had signed with and played for Miss St either they never would have said anything about the solicitation, or he would have been declared ineligible. Since Newton is playing at Auburn, and Auburn (and Kenny Rogers for that matter) claims there were no pay-for-play conversations with them, then in light of the Means case, why shouldn’t Newton be eligible?!

It’s easy to try and see light in the dark…

MURPHY

December 2nd, 2010
9:11 am

AR Dawg,

Coach got fired? When? Yeah he played high school ball with my son.He is Murray,s twin.He looks just like him.

meh

December 2nd, 2010
9:12 am

if the violation of violation of amateurism rules makes a player ineligible, would Cam have not been ineligible at the time of the violation? and therefor ineligible to play in all those games he’s played in this year?

Too Easy

December 2nd, 2010
9:12 am

Did Newton practice with the team on the day he was ineligible?

FSUTiger

December 2nd, 2010
9:14 am

Worm, you’re a joke. Time to look in the mirror and figure out what’s really going on there…

Atlanta Gator

December 2nd, 2010
9:14 am

Trisha—-

Under the circumstances, perhaps some humility, and an expression of thanks to the deity would be more appropriate than several of your in-your-face responses.

FSUTiger

December 2nd, 2010
9:14 am

“if the violation of violation of amateurism rules makes a player ineligible, would Cam have not been ineligible at the time of the violation? and therefor ineligible to play in all those games he’s played in this year?”

Fail.

CallingBSonthis

December 2nd, 2010
9:18 am

Cam and his Dad ride all the way back home together from Miss to Ga,And nothing was ever said after the Ole Miss game? How many hours is that in a car together and nothing said about the money? PLEASE!

404

December 2nd, 2010
9:19 am

There is ALWAYS a money trail.

And this money trail leads directly back to Cecile Newton and
his so-called “church.”

When the FBI is done, we will all know WHERE that money came from.

And thats where the REAL trouble will begin.

DinD

December 2nd, 2010
9:19 am

Tony, the NCAA didn’t say there was NO evidence. They said there was insufficient evidence. There is a big difference.

roy jones

December 2nd, 2010
9:19 am

Michael at 8:50 said:
This ruling DOES open the door for parents to pimp their sons and it allows the player to get away with it simply by saying, “I know nothing about it.”

This is the STUPIDEST most illogical argument being blathered about today. NO MONEY CHANGED HANDS HERE that is kind of important to “pimping your son out and getting away with it”. If Cecil Newton solicited (pimped out his son) to Auburn, received money, even with Cam knowing nothing about it he would IMMEDIATELY be ineligible…….your stupid argument makes no sense

georgia87

December 2nd, 2010
9:19 am

Mr. Jones – An agreement (by your definition) was made between Mr. Newton and Mr. Rogers. The NCAA recognized that agreement and deemed it outside of their rules. We are arguing that the punishment did not fit the crime, not if the crime was committed. The NCAA has already decided that it was committed. I was disagreeing with Tony’s assessment about the agreement.

TrishaDishaWarEagle

December 2nd, 2010
9:20 am

Atlanta Gator, why humility? AU didn’t do anything wrong., and I never met Cecil Newton..I’ve never been a go along to get along type person..when I am right (as I have been about Cams eligibility at AU, the recent spike in Silver prices, and the debacle Obama would be..) and something vindicates it(the NCAA yesterday, skyrocketing silver prices, and the midterm elections) I let it be known! haha,