NCAA wrong on Masoli ruling

I had another blog set for this morning but the news changed everything. And that’s good. So here we go:

The NCAA is wrong on the Jeremiah Masoli ruling. Here’s why.

The NCAA has refused to grant former Oregon quarterback Jeremiah Masoli a waiver to be eligible to play at Ole Miss this season. Ole Miss has appealed the ruling but it is unlikely that the appeal will be successful. I reached out to Coach Houston Nutt this morning and I would have to say that he is not optimistic.

 Here is what I see: You can make an ethical argument over whether or not Masoli, who was kicked off the Oregon team, should be allowed to play right away at Ole Miss. The fact is he got a second chance from Oregon coach Chip Kelly and he blew it. So if you want to take the position that Ole Miss should not have taken the kid in the first place, I respect that point of view.

But this is not an ethical argument. It is a legal argument. There is a system in place that allows athletes who have graduated with eligibility remaining to transfer and become eligible immediately at another school. You simply have to fulfill the requirements, which Masoli did.

Ole Miss will make the argument that the rules do not require the athlete to be in good standing with a team, but with the university where he last attended. Masoli graduated from Oregon so therefore he was in good standing with the school.

The NCAA rule says something about the transfer being for academic reasons. But the requirement states that the transferring student must enroll in a graduate program not available at his former institution. Masoli did that.

Again, you can make the argument that Ole Miss should not have  a taken the kid. I’ve got no problem with that.

But I’m not comfortable with the NCAA being able to arbitrarily say that this kid has a legitimate reason to transfer and that kid does not.  They should not have that kind of discretionary power.

There has to be a system and a set of rules. You either follow the rules or you don’t. If you follow the rules then the result should be predictable. If not, then you should get rid of the rule.

Your thoughts?

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503 comments Add your comment

Lewis Grizzard

September 1st, 2010
8:15 am

FIRST of all, I’m torn.

Tomsjeep88

September 1st, 2010
8:17 am

I say let him play. But with the NCAA, always expect the wrong decision.

Jack

September 1st, 2010
8:18 am

NCAA got it right. They sent a message. your reap what you sow in this world. Masoli’s no victim here, he had chance after chance, and his sense of entitlement took him down the wrong path.

30-24 Dawgs - We Run This State!

September 1st, 2010
8:19 am

NCAA waited too long to announce the decision but they got it right, Masoli tried to circumvent the system.

Mike

September 1st, 2010
8:21 am

Suddenly, the NCAA developes a moral and ethical code? Another wrong decision and bad message being sent by an enept governing board.

Ash

September 1st, 2010
8:23 am

Completely agree, Tony. Rule of law and all that. You don’t follow the rules, you get exactly this – a bunch of self-righteous blowhards moralizing.

Dink

September 1st, 2010
8:23 am

I tend to agree more with the NCAA on this one, but what also stinks here is the timing, waiting 4 days before opening weekend to announce.

Jason

September 1st, 2010
8:23 am

Tony-

I am surprised you back up a guy like Masoli, who has down nothing but squander his talent. Here’s the deal, use your talent and opportunities wiesely, you get more opportunities, squander them, and they are taken away. Ole Miss should be ashamed of selling their soul to win a football game. I for one, will not condone that kind of hallow and shallow action.

masoli stole my laptop

September 1st, 2010
8:23 am

how’s the saying go? “fool me once, shame on you, fool me twice, shame on me.” so what happens after a third time?

NCAA gets it right on this one, Tony. sorry.

Wash-Out Early

September 1st, 2010
8:24 am

I Hit & Run This State!!!!!

He needs another chance… ain’t like he stole something!

DawgMike

September 1st, 2010
8:24 am

It’s a slippery slope when you allow a player to transfer to another Division 1 school and immediately play without sitting out the mandatory year, regardless of the circumstances. It opens up a lot of room for debate, as this entire blog will prove.

txfood

September 1st, 2010
8:25 am

Tony, if his appeal is rejected, will Ole Miss still honor his scholarship? I wonder how ethical Ole Miss really is.

Frank Lane

September 1st, 2010
8:25 am

With you 100%. NCAA is out of line.

SimpleDawg

September 1st, 2010
8:27 am

NCAA rules should be applied equally and evenly in each case. They certainly follow the letter of the law, and their rules, when dispensing penalties on infractions.

Why then, do they think that they can slant their interpretation of their own rules. Without an exception to the rule, clearly stating that you may not transfer if you are suspended or dismissed from your former team, the NCAA doesn’t have a legal, due process leg on which to stand.

The NCAA seems to be playing God in this one…..they do seem to display that God complex from time to time.

Lewis Grizzard

September 1st, 2010
8:27 am

Tony, I agree that the NCAA has to be consistent in their rulings. But, perhaps there are extenuating circumstances of which we are (as of yet) not aware. Furthermore, Masoli only has to wait one season. If he continues to work out (with the team -off hours, or without) logic would dictate that he will be much stronger, better, wiser and with greater focus next season. Plus, this year the Ole Miss offense is rebuilding so this ruling may be a Godsend for everybody concerned.

RxDawg

September 1st, 2010
8:27 am

“There is a system in place that allows athletes who have graduated with eligibility remaining to transfer and become eligible immediately at another school. You simply have to fulfill the requirements, which Masoli did.”

That’s all I need to see on this. The NCAA likes making enemies don’t they.

Bama Fan #2

September 1st, 2010
8:29 am

Masoli is a criminal that needs to be in jail or forced to be in the armed forces like they did back
in the 50s and 60s to grow up and act like a decent human being!! I believe in giving everybody
a chance but not 2 or 3 or 4!! The NCAA really did a good thing for everybody in the SEC!! RTR

Jack

September 1st, 2010
8:29 am

What’s wrong with college football, and this country, is we are becoming a culture of entitlement, where people expect benefits, without earning them, instead of a merit based culture. The kid didn’t earn the benefit of playing. He doesn’t deserve to play just because he has talent and was highly touted in high school.

It will be a great lesson for Masoli. You have to EARN your way to success in life. You arn’t entitled to anything that’s unearned.

GeoffDawg

September 1st, 2010
8:30 am

Yep, NCAA sucks. In other news, the Sun rose in the East today.

lucky21

September 1st, 2010
8:30 am

The NCAA has to follow their own rules. If they can make everyone else follow all their insane rules like the recruiting ones then they need to follow their own first.

RxDawg

September 1st, 2010
8:30 am

Oh, but I was right yesterday that Masoli wasn’t going to be a gamechanger.

long time sec fan

September 1st, 2010
8:32 am

you are completely right Tony – you aren’t saying give the kid another chance- just follow your own rules

Rebel Fan

September 1st, 2010
8:32 am

This would not be so bad if the NCAA had not let Eniel Polynice, a former Ole Miss basketball player, tranfer to Seaton Hall to enroll in a graduate program that is not offered at Ole Miss and play this season.
I agree that Masoli doesn’t have the best background and am not thrilled that he is on the team, but the NCAA is worng.

Jim

September 1st, 2010
8:33 am

The NCAA has rules. The NCAA should follow those rules. From reading the article the NCAA is using discretion it does not have. Maybe they should change the rules to allow their judgement on a basis of morals. That could really be fun. Tony appears to be correct in his assertions.

Mr. Fudd

September 1st, 2010
8:34 am

Character counts. If you put character first, you’ll come out ahead in the long run. Ole Miss tried to put winning above character. First, that’s dumb. Second, if you roll the dice on winning above character, you run a higher risk that outweights potential rewards.

Anna

September 1st, 2010
8:34 am

He is walking on and is not on scholarship at Ole Miss. He has paid his dues to the Oregon legal system and followed the NCAA’s own transfer rules. Do we really want the NCAA in the business of judge and jury with every athlete with legal troubles? Their job is to enforce their own rules and they blew it on this one.

Donspruill

September 1st, 2010
8:35 am

Tony, you know better than to expect rational decisions out of the freaks in Indy.

TupeloRebel

September 1st, 2010
8:35 am

txfood, way to pay attention. Masoli doesn’t have a scholarship with the University. He is a walk on player.

JDW

September 1st, 2010
8:35 am

If the requirements are stated then you can bet Masoli will have legal advice soon. It would be a good thing for the NCAA to get smacked a bit. I am with you Tony, rules are rules and changing them in the middle of the game is just not right.

GeoffDawg

September 1st, 2010
8:35 am

This kind of reminds me of our federal government. Confusing the power to do something with the authority to do it.

Bama Fan #2

September 1st, 2010
8:35 am

Tony you should be talking about Mark Ingram injury and want it could did to Alabama’s chances of
going 14-0 instead of this criminal story about him trying to play for Ole Miss!! RTR

Sam

September 1st, 2010
8:36 am

Don’t kid yourself, we will look back on this and the USC sanctions as what was the beginning of the end for the NCAA. Don’t you watch “true blood”? What happens to the magistrate when his governing hand becomes wrought with arrogance and entitlement? An effing vampire slices his head off….. Same scenario here, how much money in ticket sales, jerseys, concessions, and sports gambling do you think the NCAA just cost olemiss and USC?? Start there and you’ll be on the track to any true motivation for this group of bloodsuckers!

SOGADOG

September 1st, 2010
8:37 am

In my humble opinion, the NCAA has violated basic constitutional principles of due process and equal protection under the law. The NCAA governs numerous athletic programs for state schools, thus they are a quasi government entity. By not following their own rules, or making up different rules for different players, the NCAA has violated Masoli’s right to be treated just like any other athlete and have the same rules apply to him. The NCAA likes to make up the rules as they go along to reach the result they want. I hope Masoli fights this ruling, unfortunately, a lawsuit would last for months and it is time to play football. Whether Ole Miss should have accepted Masoli is a different issue; the issue here is whether schools can sit by and allow the NCAA to change the rules after the game is played. Thanks for calling them on this Mr. Barnhart.

jumbeauxtiger

September 1st, 2010
8:38 am

Playing college football is a privledge and not a right. Unfortunately for Masoli he had his chance, twice, and blew it.

I think Nutt is taking advantage of a rule and in my opinion he should have never taken this guy in the first place. This says alot about Nutt. That’s bull when Nutt says we are in the people helping business.

Gator Mike

September 1st, 2010
8:38 am

The NCAA is getting to be a big joke. They lack consistency, and they seem to relish in being a bunch of pompous old foggies. I am not saying that college athletics does not need strong rules, but that group is archaic. The schools, players and the overwhelming number of good people playing college sports are subjected to a clown locker full of self serving egomaniacs called the NCAA.
What took the old foggies so long to make the decision against Masoli and Ole Miss? Why do they wait until the week the season starts. They need to power drink some Geritol and wake up.

Tony got this one right.

Good luck to all.
Go Gators!

david

September 1st, 2010
8:42 am

The NCAA is not the law of the United States. Masoli need to skip the appeal and get an injunction against the NCAA. NCAA need to have it’s non-profit status removed and it’s anti-trust removed. Let see the NCAA try to use its discretionary power then.

Soup Nazi

September 1st, 2010
8:43 am

Poor little masoli. Haha. No football for you. Next.

I am not going to be the head coach at Alabama. I am the head coach of the Miami Dolphins.

September 1st, 2010
8:44 am

Tony, as usual, great job. The No Clue At All finds a way to screw something up regularly. It does appear that Masoli followed the rules.

Can elaborate on exactly what the No Clue At All reasoning was in their decision?

Gen Neyland

September 1st, 2010
8:45 am

Another example of the NCAA wearing tight fitting big britches..? After all, the sign down in the NCAA Ruling Committee’s bunker says, ‘ Nobody’s right but us and if by chance we’re wrong, we’ll find something else to levy on ya. Guaranteed.’

Bo

September 1st, 2010
8:46 am

Tony until I read your blog, I thought that the NCAA was correct in their decision. And whereas I still don’t like Masoli or Ole Miss’ decision to go after him, I think you are right on the money. The NCAA should let him play and change the rule for the future. Unless of course there is some mechanism for subjective evaluation already in the rule.

Bill

September 1st, 2010
8:46 am

Tony, you’re completely wrong on this. Mr. College Football should stick with football and leave the ethical issues to others. This young man broke society’s laws at least twice; disregarded the edicts of his coach (boss) on a number of occasions and now says “I’ve done everything I’m suppose to do”. No thanks.

Jeff

September 1st, 2010
8:47 am

First, I do think the whole thing kind of smells because I think the spirit of why Masoli wants to transfer is to play, not to get another degree. HOWEVER, I do agree that with the rules in place as they are he should be allowed to play.

The NCAA is a gestapo organization that has the single-greatest power in the country to do whatever it wants with little or no due process of law. Until the NCAA is fixed and turned into an organization that can be respected and thought to do what is right and legal, nothing will change.

I didn’t agree with Ole Miss in taking him on, but I do feel for him because he did what he was asked to do and still got the shaft. Such is the way when dealing with the NCAA.

Renee Gork

September 1st, 2010
8:48 am

This is clearly Bobby Petrino’s fault.

Lane Kiffin

September 1st, 2010
8:51 am

I am without speech…..

I have zero clue as to what occurred in this CF writer’s life over the last year or so…but he has lost his friggin’ mind.

Ole Miss and Plan B

September 1st, 2010
8:52 am

Has the kid practiced at Ole Miss? If so, imagine now that if he is prevented from playing further, how disruptive that is to Ole Miss and their offense schemes. What does that say to the QB kids that were recruited by Ole Miss? He just waltzes in and he is THE starter? Really??

Nutt has always done goofy things like this and that is why he is no longer at Arkansas. I suspect that 85% of the kids on the Ole Miss squad now look at this saga like some sort of bad dream. First, “our savior is here”, then “he ain’t”. Bizarre and very disruptive to the established kids there in Oxford.

SEC rules

StraightJacket

September 1st, 2010
8:53 am

Giving young people second … and even third chances is one thing. My particular faith … and the faith of about 2 billion other people on the planet …. demands that we forgive others. Extra chances and forgiveness are great, great things.

But if continue to take public figures (like college QB’s) and treat them as if there are NO CONSEQUENCES for screwing up, then we are teaching a terrible lesson to other young people.

The NCAA is a membership organization and has the RIGHT to make its own rules. Talking about NCAA rules as they are applied within the context of the U.S. Constitution is laughable. Unless you’re a George Orwell fan …. and want Big Brother looking over EVERYthing in society.

And sitting out a year of college football seems to me to be a “light sentence” consequence …. and whether or not it is “legal” is NOT the issue. SOME meaningful consequence IS warranted in this case.

Just because something is legal does NOT mean that it is “right”.

Greg Dog

September 1st, 2010
8:53 am

Earn or Learn. That simple. Earn what you want in life, instead of expecting it to be given to you, or learn the hard way.

Bama Aaron

September 1st, 2010
8:53 am

I don’t like the fact that Masoli is there and think football is better off without him. But I agree with TB that the NCAA is wrong is their judgement. Whether you agree with Masoli being allowed to use the loophole or not, it’s there. You can’t make up the laws as you go just because you don’t like someone taking advantage of it.

JackApple

September 1st, 2010
8:56 am

How is the NCAA wrong about this? the rules are clear, Masoli did not transfer for academic reasons. tsun didnt open up the checkbook big enough.

Ron Mexico

September 1st, 2010
8:58 am

Tony, you’ve got it right, and from the looks of about 80% of your commenters, there are a lot of high horses out yonder. Regardless, if Masoli meets the standard of the rules (the spirit doesn’t matter), he should be allowed to play, until the law comes knocking. The NCAA is not the law.