Education makes the difference

By R.K. Sehgal

As a naturalized citizen, I came here believing in the superiority of U.S. public schools.  My father believed the United States would equip me with the educational and life skills that I would need to be a success. And it did.
That is why it saddens me to see the current crisis in DeKalb County, which is a glaring example of how low we’ve set the bar for education in Georgia.
When I was Georgia’s commissioner for industry, trade and tourism, and in my prior career leading a global engineering consulting firm, I had the good fortune to meet with business and political leaders across the world. I was proud to be an ambassador for my adopted country and state.
I recall a conversation with the prime minister of Japan. My job was to talk up Georgia’s world-class airport, ports and infrastructure, along with the many other benefits of doing business here. The prime minister sternly explained that Japan would expand its business footprint in places that could provide a talented and prepared workforce. That conversation was repeated in many places. Businesses go where the workforce is prepared, innovative and forward-focused. Global businesses have not flocked to my native India because of the infrastructure. What exists there in abundance is a prepared workforce. And India values continuous learning, often provided by employers and gratefully absorbed by employees who have line of sight between education and skills, and opportunity to improve their lives and create vibrant, global communities.
While infrastructure is important, what is critical is a location’s talents and skills. It’s a lesson Georgia’s leaders, parents, students and voters need to reflect on, particularly during these economic times.
DeKalb County, and all of Georgia’s counties, must make education a top priority. To do that, DeKalb has to commit to the critical importance of having a future-focused, academically prepared citizenry. But first it has to look in the mirror and declare a crisis. The word “crisis,” in Chinese, is represented by characters that mean danger and opportunity.
Given the succession of missed opportunities in our educational system in DeKalb County, it’s no wonder the cynics decry Michael Thurmond’s appointment as interim superintendent. After all, his resume is not a conventional profile for a top education administrator. But I would ask, “How are the conventional solutions working out for us?”
As commissioner, I worked with Thurmond and am familiar with his strong, innovative administrative and leadership style. He brought inspiration and energy, and an uplifting work ethic, to the Georgia Department of Labor. In reinventing the way the unemployed view becoming employed, he stressed personal accountability and responsibility for skills training, and also engaged employers in the equation.
The requirement for leadership isn’t a specific degree or professional experience. The requirement is to have a passionate commitment and create a clear and compelling vision that resonates with people
DeKalb schools appear to be on the brink of lost accreditation. Instead of doing the same thing again and expecting different results, why don’t we try an unconventional solution and be innovative like Finland, which leads the world in academic achievement through an approach that defies that taken by most Western economies?
Here, we need sustained solutions, not patchwork “interim” leadership. In business, politics and almost every area of endeavor, champions and heroes have come from unexpected places to take up the mantle of leadership with public confidence. Perhaps that’s what can happen in DeKalb County.

R.K. Sehgal, a business executive and consultant, is chairman of SFC Energy.

2 comments Add your comment

Surinder singh

March 12th, 2013
7:03 am

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Surinder singh

March 12th, 2013
7:03 am

Very inspiring and educational, let us all put our efforts to make Georgia a top state ineducation.
Let us help Dekalb first. We can do this, we second to noe.