2/19: A question of HOPE

Moderated by Maureen Downey

The history of HOPE can be told through the nearly two decades of newspaper headlines about the popular scholarship program: “Gov. Miller gives students HOPE,” “More students getting HOPE,” “HOPE running out” and “Can we keep HOPE alive?”

There’s one headline that no one in Georgia ever wants to see: “HOPE is gone.”

A victim of its own success, soaring tuitions and improved college attendance, the HOPE scholarship is running out of money. More than 256,000 students received a HOPE benefit last year, compared with fewer than 200,000 a decade ago.

The Georgia Lottery cannot keep up with both HOPE and pre-k, and lawmakers have been scrambling to come up with solutions.

Read the rest of what the AJC Editorial Board has to say, along with two commentaries  by Gov. Nathan Deal and Rep. Stacey Abrams. Then tell us what you think.

The history of HOPE can be told through the nearly two decades of newspaper headlines about the popular scholarship program: “Gov. Miller gives students HOPE,” “More students getting HOPE,” “HOPE running out” and “Can we keep HOPE alive?”
There’s one headline that no one in Georgia ever wants to see: “HOPE is gone.”
A victim of its own success, soaring tuitions and improved college attendance, the HOPE scholarship is running out of money. More than 256,000 students received a HOPE benefit last year, compared with fewer than 200,000 a decade ago.
The Georgia Lottery cannot keep up with both HOPE and pre-k, and lawmakers have been scrambling to come up with solutions.

2 comments Add your comment

resno2

February 21st, 2012
5:41 am

What needs to be made public is a penny by penny accounting of where the money is going, and how much tuition has increased since HOPE was established. Sorry Hank, but when there is an open supply of cash, it’s very difficult to believe that the Board of Regents didn’t take advantage of it.

SAWB

February 20th, 2012
11:04 am

Should we consider restructuring the entire program to offer student loans instead of scholarships? That way everyone could receive assistance to attend college, but would be expected to repay the cost of that education.