1/23: Cuts in education

Moderated by Maureen Downey
With the Legislature in session, we can expect fierce debates over how to improve education in the state. In my weekly column, I discuss what some legislators think about cuts in education, while a guest columnist wonders about the disconnect between Georgia’s standards and its performance.

10 comments Add your comment

Suzanne P. Starseed

January 24th, 2012
10:41 am

To provide our children with a high quality education, we must spend our money wisely. No amount of money will improve schools that are using inappropriate instructional methods. In my book THE ECOLOGY OF LEARNING: RE-INVENTING SCHOOLS, I show that the way we’ve been educating our children is at odds with what science tells us about the brain, learning, and motivation. This same scientific research points us toward a better way to educate our children. One that will improve their critical thinking skills, self-reliance, and ability to apply what they learn at school in the workplace and in their everyday lives.

Ron

January 23rd, 2012
6:38 pm

@ Once Again – - “Only a truly free market in education with unconstrained choices, charity schools, flexible private options, homeschooling, scholarships, etc. will ever be able to deliver a quality education to all.”

You mean to “all” who can afford to pay for private school.

Ron

January 23rd, 2012
6:36 pm

Cut technology, not people. We learned the 3R’s long before computers.

Mary Elizabeth

January 23rd, 2012
3:06 pm

Milton Man @ 1:32 pm

You are generalizing about teachers in North Fulton as well as about teachers in Bibb County. People are unique individuals, regardless of where they reside. Believe or not, there are some outstanding teachers in Bibb County.
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About money and improving education, please read my last statement from my 1:25 pm post:

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“Bottom Line: It not only takes money to improve education, but it also takes skilled, knowledgeable approaches to instruction – approaches which will address individual levels of student functioning within grade level curriculum.”
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To improve education, it does take money – but money combined with instructional skill.

tipster

January 23rd, 2012
2:59 pm

Once Again @ 12:18 – spoken like a true Boortzhead. Just brilliant. Yes, absolutely, lets just shut all public schools. That will instantly fix any and all problems.

MiltonMan

January 23rd, 2012
1:32 pm

Yet another article bascially stating that we need to spend more money to improve education. APS spends more per student than any other district in this state & the APS graduates are some of the worse performing.

The Georgia Teacher of the Year comes from Bibb County??? Does not say much about teachers in this state. I would take any teacher from North Fulton over the “best” from Bibb.

Mary Elizabeth

January 23rd, 2012
1:25 pm

Maureen Downey: “To put it bluntly: We ain’t doing too hot with actually teaching that perfect curriculum.”
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As I have pointed out, recently, in other educational columns by Ms. Downey, the primary reason that we are not “doing so hot” in teaching our “perfect curriculum” is that we are not addressing the many variances of instructional levels that students actually function on, within their grade level placement.

Once educators correct this significant flaw in the delivery of curriculum to students, Georga’s education results will more closely correlate with the excellence in Georgia’s educational curriculum.

It takes money to fund the resources to address individual differences in students, such as lowering pupil-teacher ratio by hiring more teachers, hiring paraprofessionals to aid teachers in addressing individual differences, funding teacher-training courses so that teachers better understand how to assess students’ instructional levels, on an ongoing basis, and, especially, targeting pre-K throuh 3rd grade students for special attention.

Bottom Line: It not only takes money to improve education, but it also takes skilled, knowledgeable approaches to instruction – approaches which will address individual levels of student functioning within grade level curriculum.

classroom teacher

January 23rd, 2012
1:17 pm

Doing more with less is something most of us had to get used to in this economy, but even then, within our own households, there were certain things that were sacred. Unfortunately, education is not one of those sacred things to our representatives. Maybe if it was, they’d find a way to fund it adequately.

Once Again

January 23rd, 2012
12:18 pm

Study after study shows that there is absolutely NO correllation between money spent and educational quality when it comes to government run “education” systems. The problem lies with government (as is always the case). Only a truly free market in education with unconstrained choices, charity schools, flexible private options, homeschooling, scholarships, etc. will ever be able to deliver a quality education to all.

There is nothing the legislature can do to improve education in this state except shut the entire government system down and get all government regulation and manipulation out of the marketplace.

jd

January 23rd, 2012
10:17 am

Great piece Maureen! Ultimately, it is the voters’ responsibility to realize that you can’t get more for less… and a leader’s responsibility to help voters realize what needs to be done.