Day 11: China finds no terror link to its nationals on jet

Passengers walk to check in at Malaysia Airlines counters at Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Sepang, Malaysia, Tuesday, March 18, 2014. Checks into the background of all the Chinese nationals on board the missing Malaysian jetliner have uncovered no links to terrorism, the Chinese ambassador in Kuala Lumpur said Tuesday. (AP Photo/Lai Seng Sin)

Passengers walk to check in at Malaysia Airlines counters at Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Sepang, Malaysia, Tuesday, March 18, 2014. Checks into the background of all the Chinese nationals on board the missing Malaysian jetliner have uncovered no links to terrorism, the Chinese ambassador in Kuala Lumpur said Tuesday. (AP Photo/Lai Seng Sin)

The Associated Press

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia —

Checks into the background of all the Chinese nationals on board the missing Malaysian jetliner have uncovered no links to terrorism, the Chinese ambassador in Kuala Lumpur said Tuesday.

The remarks will dampen speculation that Uighur Muslim separatists in far western Xinjiang province might have been involved with the disappearance of the Boeing 777 and its 239 passengers and crew early on March 8.

The plane was carrying 154 Chinese passengers, when Malaysian officials say someone on board deliberately diverted it from its route to Beijing less than one hour into the flight. …

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Day 11: Timeline of events

(Associated Press photo)

(Associated Press photo)

Scroll through an ajc.com interactive with  key event and chronological details about the disappearance of Flight 370.

View the timeline

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Day 10: U.S. pulling ship out of search

Crew members on board an aircraft P-8A Poseidon assist in search and rescue operations for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 in the Indian Ocean. (AP Photo/U.S. Navy, Eric A. Pastor)

Crew members on board an aircraft P-8A Poseidon assist in search and rescue operations for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 in the Indian Ocean. (AP Photo/U.S. Navy, Eric A. Pastor)

WASHINGTON —

A U.S. defense official says the Navy ship that has been helping search for the missing Malaysian airliner is dropping out of the hunt.

The official, who spoke Monday on condition of anonymity because the decision has not been officially announced, said it was determined that long-range naval aircraft are a more efficient means of looking for the plane or its debris, now that the search area has broadened. Navy P-3 and P-8 surveillance aircraft are still involved in the search.

But the official said the USS Kidd, an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer that has been searching in the Indian Ocean, will leave the area and return to its normal duties. It is part of the Navy’s 7th Fleet.

The Malaysian Airlines plane has been missing for more than a week.

Copyright The Associated Press

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Day 10: Malaysia clarifies final transmission timeline

The Associated Press

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia —

(Associated Press photo)

(Associated Press photo)

Officials revealed a new timeline Monday suggesting the final voice transmission from the cockpit of the missing Malaysian plane may have occurred before any of its communications systems were disabled, adding more uncertainty about who aboard might have been to blame.

The search for Flight 370, which vanished early March 8 while flying from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing with 239 people on board, has now been expanded deep into the northern and southern hemispheres. Australian vessels scoured the southern Indian Ocean and China offered 21 of its satellites to help Malaysia in the unprecedented hunt.

With no wreckage found in one of the most puzzling aviation mysteries of all time, relatives of those on the Boeing 777 have been left in an agonizing limbo.

Investigators say the plane was deliberately diverted during its overnight flight and flew off-course for hours. They haven’t ruled out hijacking, …

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Day 10: Missing jet reveals uncomfortable Malaysian truths

	Malaysian acting Transport Minister Hishamuddin Hussein, center, shows maps of South Corridor and North Corridor of the search and rescue as director general of the Malaysian Department of Civil Aviation, Azharuddin Abdul Rahman, right, and Malaysian Deputy Foreign Minister Hamzah Zainudin during a press conference at a hotel next to the Kuala Lumpur International Airport, in Sepang, Malaysia, Monday, March 17, 2014.  (AP Photo/Vincent Thian)

Malaysian acting Transport Minister Hishamuddin Hussein, center, shows maps of South Corridor and North Corridor of the search and rescue as director general of the Malaysian Department of Civil Aviation, Azharuddin Abdul Rahman, right, and Malaysian Deputy Foreign Minister Hamzah Zainudin during a press conference at a hotel next to the Kuala Lumpur International Airport, in Sepang, Malaysia, Monday, March 17, 2014. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian)

The Associated Press

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia —

It’s apparently a challenge to find people satisfied with the Malaysian government’s performance in its search for Flight 370: A mainstream daily newspaper here ran a story Monday on praise being lavished by an anonymous Facebook user from Sweden.

The mysterious disappearance of a Boeing 777 with 239 people aboard would test any government, but Malaysia’s is particularly strained because its elite are accustomed to getting an easy ride. Decades in power and a pliant media have …

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Day 10: Latest links on the search for Flight 370

Associated Press photo

Associated Press photo

•  Co-pilot spoke last words, “all right, good night”

•  Search from Australia to Kazakhstan

•  Report: Plane flew low to avoid radar

•  26 nations now in the search

•  NY Times: Investigation balloons into ‘global goose chase’

•  Passenger among those investigated

•  Pilot political activist, not terrorist, friends says

•  Latest timeline of flight disappearance

•  What’s new in communications, geography, more

Continue reading Day 10: Latest links on the search for Flight 370 »

Day 10: Plane search expands from Australia to Kazakhstan

A woman holds a heart shaped paper with messages for passengers aboard a missing Malaysia Airlines plane, as she poses for a photo during an event in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Monday, March 17, 2014. Authorities now believe someone on board the Boeing 777 shut down part of the aircraft's messaging system about the same time the plane with 239 people on board disappeared from civilian radar. But an Inmarsat satellite was able to automatically connect with a portion of the messaging system that remained in operation, similar to a phone call that just rings because no one is on the other end to pick it up and provide information. No location information was exchanged, but the satellite continued to identify the plane once an hour for four to five hours after it disappeared from radar screens. (AP Photo/Lai Seng Sin)

A woman holds a heart shaped paper with messages for passengers aboard a missing Malaysia Airlines plane. (AP Photo/Lai Seng Sin)

The Associated Press

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia —

The search for the missing Malaysian jet pushed deep into the northern and southern hemispheres Monday as Australia scoured the southern Indian Ocean and Kazakhstan — more than 10,000 kilometers (6,000 miles) to the northwest — answered Malaysia’s call for help in the unprecedented hunt.

French investigators arriving in Kuala Lumpur to lend expertise from the two-year search for an Air France jet that crashed into the Atlantic Ocean in 2009 said they were able to rely on distress signals. But that vital tool is missing in the Malaysia Airlines mystery because flight 370’s communications were deliberately severed ahead of its disappearance more than a week ago, investigators say.

“It’s very different from the Air France case. The Malaysian situation is much more difficult,” said Jean Paul …

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Day 10: Latest information on communications, geography, more

Associated Press photo

Associated Press photo

By The Associated Press

The Associated Press

The unprecedented hunt for a missing Malaysia Airlines jet expanded northwest to Kazakhstan and south into the desolate reaches of the Indian Ocean after Malaysian authorities concluded the plane was deliberately diverted. A summary of the latest information on the search for the plane and the investigation into what happened:

LAST COMMUNICATIONS

The Boeing 777’s Aircraft and Communications Addressing and Reporting System, or ACARS, last transmitted at 1:07 a.m., about 30 minutes after takeoff. ACARS sends information about the jet’s engines and other data to the airline.

The final, reassuring words from the cockpit — “All right, good night” — were believed to have been spoken by co-pilot Fariq Abdul Hamid, according to Malaysia Airlines CEO Ahmad Jauhari Yahya.

The transponder, which identifies the plane to commercial radar systems, shut down about 1:20 a.m., and an ACARS update that was due at …

Continue reading Day 10: Latest information on communications, geography, more »

Day 10: Plane flew low to avoid radar

Report from the New Straits Times:

MAS Airlines flight MH370 dropped to an altitude of 5,000 feet, or possibly lower, to defeat commercial (secondary) radar coverage after it turned back from its Kuala Lumpur-Beijing route on March 8.

Read the full article

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Day 10: AP timeline of Flight 370 disappearance

A relative of Chinese passengers aboard the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 uses her smartphone to watch a news conference held by the airlines' officials at a hotel ballroom in Beijing Monday, March 17, 2014. The search for the missing Malaysian jet pushed deep into the northern and southern hemispheres Monday as Australia took the lead in scouring the seas of the southern Indian Ocean and Kazakhstan - about 10,000 miles to the northwest - answered Malaysia's call for help in the unprecedented hunt. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

A relative of Chinese passengers aboard the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 uses her smartphone to watch a news conference held by the airlines' officials at a hotel ballroom in Beijing Monday, March 17, 2014. The search for the missing Malaysian jet pushed deep into the northern and southern hemispheres Monday as Australia took the lead in scouring the seas of the southern Indian Ocean and Kazakhstan – about 10,000 miles to the northwest – answered Malaysia's call for help in the unprecedented hunt. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

The Associated Press

The sequence of events surrounding the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370:

— March 8, 12:41 a.m. The plane carrying 239 people leaves Kuala Lumpur heading to Beijing.

— 1:07 a.m. ACARS transmits its regular, half-hourly data report about the jet’s engines and other data to the airline.

— 1:19 a.m. Someone, apparently the co-pilot, makes the final voice communication from the cockpit, saying “All right, good night” to …

Continue reading Day 10: AP timeline of Flight 370 disappearance »

Day 10: Co-pilot spoke last words, Malaysia says

 Malaysia's acting Transport Minister Hishamuddin Hussein shows maps of southern corridor and northern corridor of the search and rescue operation during a press conference at a hotel near the Kuala Lumpur International Airport, in Sepang, Malaysia, Monday, March 17, 2014. Twenty-six countries are involved in the massive international search for the Malaysia Airlines jetliner that disappeared on March 8 with 239 people aboard. They include not just military assets on land, at sea and in the air, but also investigators and the specific support and assistance requested by Malaysia, such as radar and satellite information. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian)

Malaysia's acting Transport Minister Hishamuddin Hussein shows maps of southern corridor and northern corridor of the search and rescue operation during a press conference at a hotel near the Kuala Lumpur International Airport, in Sepang, Malaysia, Monday, March 17, 2014. Twenty-six countries are involved in the massive international search for the Malaysia Airlines jetliner that disappeared on March 8 with 239 people aboard. They include not just military assets on land, at sea and in the air, but also investigators and the specific support and assistance requested by Malaysia, such as radar and satellite information. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian)

The Associated Press

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia —

Malaysia Airlines believes the co-pilot aboard the missing plane spoke the last words to ground controllers.

Malaysia Airlines CEO Ahmad Jauhari Yahya said at a news conference Monday that initial investigations indicate that co-pilot is the one who calmly said, “All right, good …

Continue reading Day 10: Co-pilot spoke last words, Malaysia says »

Day 10: 26 nations involved in search, AP reports

Associated Press photo

Associated Press photo

The Associated Press

Twenty-six countries are involved in the massive international search for the Malaysia Airlines jetliner that disappeared on March 8 with 239 people aboard. They include not just military assets on land, at sea and in the air, but also investigators and the specific support and assistance requested by Malaysia, such as radar and satellite information.

Here’s a look at major countries and their response:

MALAYSIA

Malaysia, which is coordinating the search, has deployed about 18 aircraft and 27 ships, including the submarine support vessel MV Mega Bakti, which can detect objects at a depth of up to 1,000 meters (3,280 feet).

AUSTRALIA

Australia has sent two AP-3C Orion aircraft, one of which is searching the waters to the north and west of the Cocos Islands. Australia’s defense department is refusing to say whether Malaysia has asked Australia to divulge any radar information, but Prime Minister Tony Abbott said Monday …

Continue reading Day 10: 26 nations involved in search, AP reports »

Day 10: Search begins in both northern, southern corridors

The Associated Press

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia —

Malaysia says searches have begun in both the northern and southern corridors of a vast swath of Asia where the missing Malaysia Airlines jet is believed to have ended up.

Malaysian Defense Minister Hishammuddin Hussein says that Kazakhstan joined the search Monday in the farthest northwest section of the search area. Earlier Monday, Australia said was taking the lead in searching over the southern Indian Ocean.

Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 with 239 people aboard went missing March 8 en route to Beijing. Investigators say it was deliberately diverted.

Malaysian authorities say satellite data shows the plane sent a signal about 7 ½ hours after takeoff — shortly before it would have run out of fuel — from somewhere on a huge arc stretching from Kazakhstan to the southern Indian Ocean.

Copyright The Associated Press

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Day 10: NY Times report: ‘Global goose chase’

A Chinese girl is taken a picture in front of an electronic display showing the weather information of the cities in Asia at the Kuala Lumpur International Airport, in Sepang, Malaysia, Monday, March 17, 2014. When someone at the controls calmly said the last words heard from the missing Malaysian jetliner, one of the Boeing 777's communications systems had already been disabled, adding to suspicions that one or both of the pilots were involved in the disappearance of the flight. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian)

A Chinese girl is taken a picture in front of an electronic display showing the weather information of the cities in Asia at the Kuala Lumpur International Airport, in Sepang, Malaysia, Monday, March 17, 2014. When someone at the controls calmly said the last words heard from the missing Malaysian jetliner, one of the Boeing 777's communications systems had already been disabled, adding to suspicions that one or both of the pilots were involved in the disappearance of the flight. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian)

A report in The New York Times says that the timing of a report by the pilot is focusing the inquiry and notes the investigation has “ballooned into a global goose chase for information.”

SEPANG, Malaysia — A signaling system was disabled on the missing Malaysia Airlines jet before a pilot spoke to air traffic control without mentioning any trouble, a senior Malaysian official said Sunday, reinforcing theories that one or both of the pilots may have been involved in …

Continue reading Day 10: NY Times report: ‘Global goose chase’ »

Day 10: From Reuters, NBC: Passenger among those investigated

	A relative shows the media a screen of his mobile phone while calling a mobile phone number of a Chinese passenger aboard the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 during a demonstration at a hotel ballroom in Beijing, China, Monday, March 17, 2014. The relative claims that the dialing tone kept ringing, hut failed to connect, indicating that the mobile phone was switched on. (AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan)

A relative shows the media a screen of his mobile phone while calling a mobile phone number of a Chinese passenger aboard the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 during a demonstration at a hotel ballroom in Beijing, China, Monday, March 17, 2014. The relative claims that the dialing tone kept ringing, hut failed to connect, indicating that the mobile phone was switched on. (AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan)

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia – A flight engineer who was among the passengers on the missing jet is being investigated by Malaysian police as they focus on the pilots and anyone else on board who had technical flying knowledge, a senior police official told Reuters.

The aviation engineer is Mohd Khairul Amri Selamat, 29, a Malaysian who has said on social media he had worked for a private jet charter company.

“Yes, we are looking into Mohd Khairul as well as the other passengers and crew. The focus is on anyone else who might have had aviation skills on that plane,” a …

Continue reading Day 10: From Reuters, NBC: Passenger among those investigated »

Day 10 from USAToday: Pilot is political activist, but not terrorist, friend says

Relatives of Chinese passengers aboard missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 watch a TV news program about the missing plane as they wait for more official information at a hotel ballroom in Beijing, China, Monday, March 17, 2014. Attention focused Sunday on the pilots of the missing Malaysia Airlines flight after the country's leader announced findings so far that suggest someone with intimate knowledge of the Boeing 777's cockpit seized control of the plane and sent it off-course. (AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan)

Relatives of Chinese passengers aboard missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 watch a TV news program about the missing plane as they wait for more official information at a hotel ballroom in Beijing, China, Monday, March 17, 2014. Attention focused Sunday on the pilots of the missing Malaysia Airlines flight after the country's leader announced findings so far that suggest someone with intimate knowledge of the Boeing 777's cockpit seized control of the plane and sent it off-course. (AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan)

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia — The pilot of the Malaysia Airlines jet that vanished more than a week ago is a strong supporter of the political opposition leader here, but friends vehemently deny that he is a terrorist.

Flight 370 pilot Zaharie Ahmad Shah has close ties with Malaysian opposition leader Anwar Ibrahim, who has been fighting a charge of sodomy. Hours before boarding the flight, Zaharie turned up at the Court of Appeal in the country’s new administrative …

Continue reading Day 10 from USAToday: Pilot is political activist, but not terrorist, friend says »

Day 10: Searchers relying on satellite data to find plane

 An unidentified woman wearing a mask depicting the flight of the missing Malaysia Airline, MH370. (AP Photo/Joshua Paul)

An unidentified woman wearing a mask depicting the flight of the missing Malaysia Airline, MH370. (AP Photo/Joshua Paul)

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON —

Finding a missing Malaysia Airlines plane may hinge on whether searchers can narrow down where they need to look using satellite data that is inexact and has never been used for that purpose before, search and rescue experts say.

Authorities now believe someone on board the Boeing 777 shut down part of the aircraft’s messaging system about the same time the plane with 239 people on board disappeared from civilian radar. But an Inmarsat satellite was able to automatically connect with a portion of the messaging system that remained in operation, similar to a phone call that just rings because no one is on the other end to pick it up and provide information. No location information was exchanged, but the satellite continued to identify the plane once an hour for four to five hours after it disappeared from radar …

Continue reading Day 10: Searchers relying on satellite data to find plane »

Day 10: Australia takes up southern search

The Associated Press

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia —

Australia took the lead Monday in searching for the missing Boeing 777 over the southern Indian Ocean as Malaysia requested radar data and search planes to help in the unprecedented hunt through a vast swath of Asia stretching northwest into Kazakhstan.

Investigators say the Malaysia Airlines jet carrying 239 people was deliberately diverted and its communications equipment switched off shortly after takeoff during an overnight flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing on March 8. Suspicion has fallen on anyone aboard the plane with aviation experience, particularly the pilot and co-pilot.

Malaysian police confiscated a flight simulator from the pilot’s home Saturday and also visited the home of the co-pilot, in what Malaysia’s police chief Khalid Abu Bakar later said was the first police visits to those homes. The government issued a statement Monday contradicting that account by saying that police first visited the …

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Day 9: Searchers relying on satellite data to find plane

In this photo provided by the U.S. Navy, crew members on board an aircraft P-8A Poseidon assist in search and rescue operations for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 in the Indian Ocean on Sunday, March 16, 2014.  (AP Photo/U.S. Navy, Eric A. Pastor)

In this photo provided by the U.S. Navy, crew members on board an aircraft P-8A Poseidon assist in search and rescue operations for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 in the Indian Ocean on Sunday, March 16, 2014. (AP Photo/U.S. Navy, Eric A. Pastor)

By JOAN LOWY

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON —Finding a missing Malaysia Airlines plane may hinge on whether searchers can narrow down where they need to look using satellite data that is inexact and has never been used for that purpose before, search and rescue experts say.

Authorities now believe someone on board the Boeing 777 shut down part of the aircraft’s messaging system about the same time the plane with 239 people on board disappeared from civilian radar. But an Inmarsat satellite was able to automatically connect with a portion of the messaging system that remained in operation, similar to a phone call that just rings because no one is on the other end to pick it up and provide information. No location …

Continue reading Day 9: Searchers relying on satellite data to find plane »

Day 9: Final words from jet came after systems shutdown

A Malaysian military soldier petrols the viewing gallery of the Kuala Lumpur International Airport where dedication boards with well wishes and messages for people involved with the missing Malaysia Airlines jetliner MH370 is displayed, Sunday, March 16, 2014 in Sepang, Malaysia. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)

A Malaysian military soldier petrols the viewing gallery of the Kuala Lumpur International Airport where dedication boards with well wishes and messages for people involved with the missing Malaysia Airlines jetliner MH370 is displayed, Sunday, March 16, 2014 in Sepang, Malaysia. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)

The Associated Press

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia —

When someone at the controls calmly said the last words heard from the missing Malaysian jetliner, one of the Boeing 777’s communications systems had already been disabled, authorities said Sunday, adding to suspicions that one or both of the pilots were involved in the disappearance of the flight.

Investigators also examined a flight simulator confiscated from the home of one of the pilots and dug through the background of all 239 people on board, as well as the ground crew that serviced the plane.

The Malaysia Airlines jet took off from Kuala Lumpur in the wee hours of March 8, headed to Beijing. On Saturday, the …

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